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RichardS

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  1. I'm sorry you read it like that however, I fail to see any intimation in it myself. It's simply a forecast of how I suspect things might develop in the future.
  2. I cannot see that I named any individuals Phil or suggested that anybody is a liar. That is your incorrect interpretation of the points I made. Publishers are fickle, titles change hands, new editorial regimes arise. You nor Andy York or anybody else can guarantee anything will be so in the future. Yes, as of today, there may be no intention to change anything. But in a year, two, three who can say. And I was looking into the future in my comments. As I concluded we shall see.
  3. Looks to me like a straightforward monterisation exercise of a social media service. If RMWeb Gold replaces the digital subscription at no premium then I can't see what is in it for Warners unless additional digital subscribers are recruited. This would probably happen over time anyway with demographic changes but I suspect this is a ploy to acclerate the process with thee ultimate goal of ending the hard copy magazine. In time it is inevitable that only subscribers will be allowed to post on the forum except perhaps in a guest area. For the present such moves will be denied but this is what I would be looking to do if RMWeb is seen as a future revenue stream for Warners. Either that it load it up with advertising - which of course will be in the digital magazine anyway. We shall see.
  4. I think you need to be more tolerant. These people are probably homeless and carry all their worldly goods around with them.
  5. Thanks David. I shall certainly consider this in due course.
  6. Looking good. I've never heard of Sculptamould before. Is there any chance of a close up picture of the surface texture. The product looks promising and in time I will have a considerable area on my own layout to dress. Many thanks.
  7. RichardS

    Bian Bos

    Having spent some time happily carving away at the polystyrene I was eventually satisfied with the basic form I had achieved. As the nature of this experiment has become more formal I’ve given the diorama a name – Bian Bos which is my East Anglian attempt at Cornish for Small Dwelling. No doubt a competent Cornish linguist will/might correct me if any grammatical elements are wrong. I need to test a fake water medium so I’ve included a culvert and a small brook at one end of the board. The stone work is knocked up from a Wills sheet. Not sure about scale but how big are these things anyway – on Bosmellin itself the culvert is for a mill race I imagine it is medium size – I have seen no pictures of this feature from the site. Then out came the plaster bandage and a couple of layers applied with some screwed up and pushed in more angular places thus rounding things off a bit. Overall I have tried to produce a modest range of curves, steps, outcrops but with nothing too dominant or heavy. Once it is dry I will apply a coat of plaster. There are a few – but only a few – outcrops of exposed rock in the slopes at Boscarne so I have cast some bits in Woodland Scenic s moulds. Whether these will be suitable or look right I cannot say as yet. Again I used Plaster of Paris from Hobbycraft for these – £3.75 for 1KG – far cheaper than similar branded products. To be fair it took a bit longer to set and is slightly heavier than say WS Hydrocal. I turned the casts out of the mould after about 90 minutes and by and large they came out very clean and crisp. Only one or two air bubbles had been trapped. My goal for this week is to get the culvert painted up, masked and fitted. The stone outcrops fixed on and a coat of plaster over the bandage. As things are taking a little while to dry out in my “railway parlour” (garage) I don’t want to rush onto other sections before the previous is complete. I’ve settled (I think) on the base board layout for Bosmellin itself so will start drawing up and calculating quantities of materials. And next weekend is the London Festival of Model railways at Alexandra Palace so I have to make time to visit that too. My zeal is presently boundless. All the best. Richard
  8. RichardS

    Polystyrene.

    Thanks for the comments @Mikkel and @TheQ . A proper modeller - I like that, a lot! There's something satisfying about slicing through the material with a hot wire. I think with Paul Bambrick's book like all of these things it's about of taking the ideas and applying them to your situation rather than religiously following them. It's a weighty tome and there's a lot of info contained in it's pages. I hadn't thought of J Cloths I might give them a try. I have found plaster bandage at Hobbycraft they do 3m rolls by I think 8cm for £1 which is quite a bit cheaper per sqm than branded versions. A colleague ordered some from a medical supply company and that worked out quite cheap too. Tasma also do a cheaper versions which is fine. For this little project there's no point in ordering in bulk but when I get round to the main layout I'll need considerable amounts. I was lucky to be talking to Barry Norman on Friday evening (I move in exalted circles - although they probably think I'm the caretaker or something) about baseboards he used on Petherick and he still felt that wire netting covered with bandage or similar was valid provided the underside of the netting was also plastered over - this must avoid separation and I suppose the netting then performs the same role as the mesh or J cloths. All the best
  9. RichardS

    Polystyrene.

    I’ve started adding some polystyrene to the foam board experiment to create some topography. Boscarne junction is cut into a hill side so at the rear there is a fairly steep bank. While to the front the same hillside falls down to water meadows and the river. The whole exercise is turning into a little diorama and I shall experiment further with the surface dressings I might use on Bosmelin. Thus I shall need to include some ‘water’ and of course trees both of which I am less confident about. A while back I bought Paul Bambrick’s book ‘Creating a Backscene.’ Backscenes on model railways are often a bit of a Cinderella feature. Occasionally one will see a top notch backscene but more often than not they are blue painted pieces of hardboard. Inevitably these are too low and end up as elbow rests for operators. A slovenly presentation at best. Less frequent but far too common are layouts with no backscene save for coffee cups, beer bellies and “stuff.” Enough said. Backscenes are crucial for presentation in my view and constrain the layout. They can add atmosphere and provide time and place. To provide depth a back scene can be built in 3D or as a kind of decopage and I shall use the experimental board to test this too. I’ve been planning this adventure for far too long but now my zeal has been unleashed.
  10. Oops, sorry, completely missed that. Thanks David. :-) But I'm not sure there was any need, Don B, for the exclamation mark. I do apologise if my inadequacy offended you so much. Yes, punctuation is important and exclamation marks are powerful endings to sentences. In fact these two responses are a good learning point for all who use social media such as this forum. Notice the same message conveyed in quite different ways. One polite, one disparaging. One explained, the other tried to belittle with an assumed superiority. Even the opening word in the latter, 'sorry', is part of the subsequent expression of intolerence and despair at the incompetence I deigned to display. It must be terrible for my betters to suffer those such as I. My sincere apologies to David/Fen End Pit for going OT on this. I implore that any further comments be limited to matters regarding his model and the techniques he has shown.
  11. This is looking good. Can I ask what your source of polystyrene is please?
  12. RichardS

    Prototyping

    Bosmelin will be a railway in a landscape. The track layout will be laid on a spine of baseboards with the main scenic sections added around it in a jigsaw manner. This has several advantages regarding space, manoeuvrability, weight, access and so forth. The visual experience is crucial and the jigsaw enhances this by avoiding continuous join lines. Joins being disguised by field hedges and banks for example in a random pattern. To evaluate how large the spine boards need to be and how they need to be arranged – the track alignment is not straight – I am building a mock up of one section. At Boscarne the B&WR was built on a ‘shelf’ above the river thus the hillside rises behind the line and falls away quite steeply to the valley floor in front of it. Thus the spine boards will be open topped construction. The known unknown I face is how wide these boards need to be as there will be the start of the scenery each side of the tracks. The mock up will hopefully demonstrate how things will appear. I’ve used 5mm Foamboard (Hobbycraft) in a gider style for this fixed together with PVA and Solvent Free Grab adhesive (Screwfix). Here is a picture of the first stages of construction.
  13. Although Oby (see previous posts) is bubbling away my main project is and always has been a layout called “Bosmelin” and it is this that I shall be progressing in 2019. I have found the history and operations of the Bodmin & Wadebridge Railway, which linked the two towns after which it was named, particularly interesting. My library of books about the line and related magazine articles has grown over the last decade while the release of several ready to run models that were prototypical to the line mean that making a model of the line is quite feasible. With Wadebridge at the western end of the line and Bodmin at the eastern there were three other mid-line locations of interest. Travelling from Wadebridge the first of these was Grogley Junction where the short goods branch to Ruthernbridge diverged from the ‘main line’ – a generous description for what was essentially a backwater branch line. The next location was the Junction at Boscarne named after a hamlet in the Parish of Nanstallon. Boscarne Junction was where the B&WR coincided with a short branch line from Bodmin (GWR.) This facilitated through running from the main GWR Plymouth to Penzance line at Bodmin Road albeit with a reversal midway at Bodmin (GWR.) Linked to Boscarne Junction and effectively under the control of Boscarne Junction Signal Box was the third junction at Dunmere where the B&WR split into two arms; the one to Bodmin (LSWR) and the other to the goods only terminus at Wenford Bridge. As can be seen Boscarne Junction was a pivotal operating point on the line which had originally been opened in 1834 to transport sand gathered from the estuary of the River Camel at Wadebridge to a series of ‘wharves’ at various villages along the line. The sand was used by farmers and landowners to improve the soil in their fields and in practice was unloaded more or less where it was needed – while the wharves were used for other goods. In the early days granite from the De Lank Quarry on Bodmin Moor was regularly carried from Wenford Bridge – the blocks being conveyed to the terminus down an incline from the quarries. Later, china clay from the Wenford Dries just south of the terminus was the primary freight carried on the line – most being taken from Boscarne Junction along the GWR lines to the deep water port at Fowey on the south coast of Cornwall. In the early days clay was also shipped from Wadebridge and Padstow. Ball clay from the pits in North Devon also found it’s way over B&WR metals having been transported to Wadebridge via the North Cornwall Railway. The line from Boscarne Junction to Wadebridge survived as a freight only line until the 1970s after which the china clay from Wenford Dries became the only goods carried until the pits on Bodmin Moor were closed. Today the Bodmin & Wenford Railway Ltd – the principal standard gauge heritage line in Cornwall – runs trains between Bodmin General (ex GWR) and Boscarne Junction. Next time I’ll explain how ‘Bosmelin’ fits in to this.
  14. Although Oby (see previous posts) is bubbling away my main project is and always has been a layout called “Bosmelin” and it is this that I shall be progressing in 2019. I have found the history and operations of the Bodmin & Wadebridge Railway, which linked the two towns after which it was named, particularly interesting. My library of books about the line and related magazine articles has grown over the last decade while the release of several ready to run models that were prototypical to the line mean that making a model of the line is quite feasible. With Wadebridge at the western end of the line and Bodmin at the eastern there were three other mid-line locations of interest. Travelling from Wadebridge the first of these was Grogley Junction where the short goods branch to Ruthernbridge diverged from the ‘main line’ – a generous description for what was essentially a backwater branch line. The next location was the Junction at Boscarne named after a hamlet in the Parish of Nanstallon. Boscarne Junction was where the B&WR coincided with a short branch line from Bodmin (GWR.) This facilitated through running from the main GWR Plymouth to Penzance line at Bodmin Road albeit with a reversal midway at Bodmin (GWR.) Linked to Boscarne Junction and effectively under the control of Boscarne Junction Signal Box was the third junction at Dunmere where the B&WR split into two arms; the one to Bodmin (LSWR) and the other to the goods only terminus at Wenford Bridge. As can be seen Boscarne Junction was a pivotal operating point on the line which had originally been opened in 1834 to transport sand gathered from the estuary of the River Camel at Wadebridge to a series of ‘wharves’ at various villages along the line. The sand was used by farmers and landowners to improve the soil in their fields and in practice was unloaded more or less where it was needed – while the wharves were used for other goods. In the early days granite from the De Lank Quarry on Bodmin Moor was regularly carried from Wenford Bridge – the blocks being conveyed to the terminus down an incline from the quarries. Later, china clay from the Wenford Dries just south of the terminus was the primary freight carried on the line – most being taken from Boscarne Junction along the GWR lines to the deep water port at Fowey on the south coast of Cornwall. In the early days clay was also shipped from Wadebridge and Padstow. Ball clay from the pits in North Devon also found it’s way over B&WR metals having been transported to Wadebridge via the North Cornwall Railway. The line from Boscarne Junction to Wadebridge survived as a freight only line until the 1970s after which the china clay from Wenford Dries became the only goods carried until the pits on Bodmin Moor were closed. Today the Bodmin & Wenford Railway Ltd – the principal standard gauge heritage line in Cornwall – runs trains between Bodmin General (ex GWR) and Boscarne Junction. Next time I’ll explain how ‘Bosmelin’ fits in to this.
  15. I think this is what you seek. https://www.udeuschle.de/panoramas/makepanoramas.htm I kept it in my favourites.
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