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1whitemoor

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  • Location
    East Anglia & North East
  • Interests
    Industrial & East Midlands Ironstone

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  1. Certainly not while in industry, that accolade (standard gauge, in the UK at least) would belong to Black Hawthorn 266 of 1873 "Holwell No.3". Paul A.
  2. Hi All, Another loco post, this time a modified RTR product. Peckett P1549 of 1919 "Betty" Built by Peckett's of Bristol to the B2 design, P1549 was delivered new to The Bloxham and Whiston Ironstone Co. Ltd. in 1919 as a replacement for an Avonside loco. Bloxham had taken delivery of another Peckett the previous the year in the form of P1456 of 1918 "Margôt". The pair worked at Bloxham until 1929 when the quarries closed. In 1931 the loco moved to the Islip Ironworks where she was rebuilt with standard buffers with 16'' heads, new sandbox pu
  3. My question was about "loading gauge" - a pretty critical consideration for layouts with platforms, bridges, tunnels etc. They are significantly wider and taller than a Mk1, are they not? Paul A.
  4. These choices are very niche, even within the niche world of industrial locomotives and operations. Have you done any research prior to this announcement to determine market demand for a 12-axle Torpedo wagon? As it is at CAD stage I have to ask - one presumes that these are outside UK-loading gauge and will need design compromises to the bogies to negotiate typical set track curves and points? I have no agenda here , but these are questions which immediately spring to mind and I would want to hear much more on. Paul A.
  5. A very worthy cause indeed. I've build a 4mm scale model of this loco. Some additional historic details and the build are covered over on this thread in the Standard Gauge Industrial Railways area of the forum. Modified press release posted over on the thread too, thanks Ian. Paul A.
  6. Hi All, Some fantastic news regarding the future of Avonside 1972 of 1927 - please see press release below Help us to keep historic ironstone quarry locomotive in Rutland Standard gauge steam locomotive named “STAMFORD” currently resides, on loan, within the exhibition centre at Rocks by Rail – the Living Ironstone Museum based near Cottesmore in Rutland. This locomotive was built by the Avonside Engine Co. in Bristol in 1927 and spent all of its working life at the Staveley Minerals Ironstone Quarry railway at Pilton, Rutland. Furthermore, it is the
  7. Okay, but where are the quality photographs of this EP for further comment if that is the case? The video footage of the EP was linked by a forum member, not published directly to RMweb by KR. I wonder if there is something to that... There may be no such thing as "bad publicity" but gaffes and missteps do impact brand perception in the eyes of the consumer. Paul A.
  8. Not too much interesting to report. Some more paint has been slapped around on the baseboard and three shades of coloured grout have been acquired to form the road and yard surface. I'll be working off prototype photos and mixing different relative quantities together for different areas etc. The shed has acquired a roof and is awaiting application of the side cladding. A few have commented that it seems a shame to clad it - but it needs to be fully completed if it is to represent a shed in use. The "newer" portion to the front should be self-evident due to the change
  9. This is seen on a number of Peckett works photographs around the same time period and was likely a style they occasionally turned out. Let's be clear here - the works photograph of 882 depicts the loco in its working clothes and it is the same colour as the rest of the works shots from the era. The locos wear a leaf green livery, it's not really open to debate. The frames of some have been painted grey or red to aid photography for a classic "catalogue" shot. Paul A.
  10. Has there been any further news on this or have KR reconsidered? Paul A.
  11. I have consulted my copy of "Peckett & Sons Ltd: An album of official photographs" by A. Smith and can safely conclude it is a trick of the photography and a shadow (or lightening of the lower half of the loco to show detail, done post-shoot) , this effect is doubtlessly reinforced by the change in lining style with a black background. An identical effect is seen on the official images for Wks no. 907, 925 , 959, 1055 and 1217 etc in the publication - and probably others, I stopped looking after that. Paul A.
  12. The loco is evidently not photographed "as new" but on the other hand it has clearly only been out-shopped a few years prior, evidenced my general cleanliness and state. The livery is leaf green, lined yellow on black backing on the upper portion of the cab. The green infill being a completely different shade on the model is something which I'm afraid is not correct to my mind - and if indeed this is "fresh" paint and the rest aged or faded (extremely unlikely) then that is not represented on the model. An additional thing to note is that the plate affixed to the cabsid
  13. I'd be very interested to learn how Hornby arrived at the livery for this most recent Peckett. I've handled the print of this at the NRM while looking for a photo of a NG prototype, the darker upper cab side honestly just looks like a re-touched photo and there's no examples from the colour photography world showing that Peckett's had different shades of green on their locos at the same time. Paul A.
  14. 1whitemoor

    2021 hopes

    Let's be honest, nobody can say that. Plenty of examples where limited editions or items have appeared again in all walks of life - there's no contract to say this and just like a bands "farewell" or "final tour", there's no substance to it. Paul A.
  15. Hi Marc, I will be in the market for a set of parts once you have drawn them up. Feel free to PM me when you are ready. Thanks Paul A.
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