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del00

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  1. del00

    A new start

    Progress has been slow, mainly due to the weather. So in place of any progress photos, here is a description of how I installed all the points and got the solenoid motors aligned correctly. On the test layout, I drilled a 10mm hole under where the tie bar was and just screwed the motors in underneath. While this is quick and easy, it does lead to issues with the alignment of the pin travel bar. The operating pin is not always installed along the plane of the tie bar. This results in a re-installation, mostly by guess work to get the motor to operate correctly. On top of this, the 10mm hole means that ballasting becomes a nightmare and so points are often ballasted only so far, creating a scenic nightmare. With well over 20 points to install, I wanted a more accurate and tidy installation method. This is only a how I done it, I am not trying to teach anyone how to suck eggs. If you find the method helpful I am happy. The method is for seep solenoid motors, but I am sure the practice can be used for others. First create a template of the point motor. Make sure that the centre of the pin travel line is marked. Now mark the geometry of the point it self. Place the point on the baseboard where it is going to be installed and mark either side of the tie bar and the middle of the track at both ends of the straight section. Remove the point to show the marks. Join the marks to form a cross. Place the template on the line of the tie bar with the centre of the pin travel on the centre of the cross and mark the corner screws and the length of the travel of the pin. Remove the template and mark the ends of the pin travel marks across the tie bar line. You now have all the information that you need to install the motor correctly. Chain drill a line between the two pin travel marks to create the aperture for the pin and drill guide holes for the screws. I used a 3mm bit for the chain and a 1mm bit for the screw guide holes. Use a tile cutter bit to connect the chain so that you have an adequate aperture for the pin to move. You will end up with this. As seen from above the baseboard and this. As seen from below. Screw the motor into the baseboard. Use a scrap piece of track to mark the height to cut the pin. I used a pair of strong electrical wire cutters to do this. Be aware that the pin is hard and if you cut using this method the piece of cut pin WILL fly of in a random direction at extreme speed. Be very careful. You can use a cutting/grinding piece on your rotary multi-tool, but you may have to use something to hold the pin in place as it moves about. I do not suggest cutting the pin after the point has been installed. If you cut with wire cutters there will be a bit of pin standing proud which could cause a short. Using the grinding tool on a rotary could cut into the tie bar itself. The fiddly bit is getting the point onto the pin. With a bit of practice, this is not too much of a problem. There is a youtube video of a gentlemen using a piece of thread to guide the tie bar onto the pin if you find the unguided method too stressful. As I said, progress has been slow. I am now working on the control panel which will be in two parts, one for either end of the layout. I will post details of their creation when they are complete. At some point I should also post pictures of the rolling stock. Gary, I have been looking at the Arduino for accessory control, so I may come to you for assistance in the future. I will also sign up with MERG when funds permit. As I said in an earlier post, I am interested in the automation of operations. I have been looking at both JMRI and Rocrail. I do not want to start an argument, but is there any real difference in the operation of the software and the writing? I will in due course be exploring the use of RFID as loco detection if this helps. That's me done for now. Many thanks for looking. Del
  2. del00

    A new start

    Hi Gary, Sorry for taking so long to reply, I have been trying to find the time to write this post. A bit of background is probably what is needed. There is no era, I have collected a wide variety of rolling stock over the years, making impossible to define a time. The layout itself has no real place, the main station will be loosely modeled on the stations along the route out of London Liverpool Street towards Shenfield. It will be called Kings Gate. The second station will be Heath Park Depot and will serve the loading depot and TMD. The layout is DCC. The buildings will mostly be Scalescenes. The track is a mix of Peco and Hornby, the Hornby stuff is what was I could recover from the test layout. Turnouts are powered by Seep PM1's which will provide feedback to the control board to illuminate route denoting LED's. The DCC control is by Hornby's Railmaster and Elink. I did have a Bachmann Dynamis, but it has not survived the last six years and no longer works. The reason for going for Elink was purely based on cost. My brother has a habit of giving us WHSmiths vouchers for birthdays and christmas. These mount up as I can only find printer ink to buy with them. During their January sale, they had the Western Master set reduced and with the free delivery on the price break, it meant getting a free way of controlling the layout. I have been interested in control via PC for a while, but all options were out of my price range. I am aware of systems like JMRA, but don't really have the time or inclination to code operations. Can't wait for Hornby to release thier Loco Detection system. I am not holding my breath, I get the impression that the wait will still be a long one. When funds allow, I will bring the control of the Seep's onto the computer. Hi Les, You're right, trackpins serve the purpose well. I may remove some of them in the more obvious, photogenic areas. Despite the temperatures in the loft, I have got as much of the track laid as I can. I have completed the run around, main and secondary stations. The loading and traction depots will have to wait for the moment. This has been determined by funds. Photo time. As you can see, I am using the spare space as a workbench, but I am running out of room quickly. I have been researching a way of distributing power and DCC signal. I had found that adding the droppers under the track worked well on the test layout so used this method here. Its a bit of a faf trying to accurately drill the holes to pass them through the board, but the end result is worth it as they do not show at all after ballasting. The droppers are .75mm electrical wire. I still had a 50m drum of the stuff laying around. While looking at the various ways of connecting them all up under the boards, I came upon these. They are small brass power distribution bus bars. Ideal for the power cable and droppers, as you can see, each cable has its own place and is held by a retaining screw. This may be useful later if I have to isolate a section of track. They can be found at HobbyTronics. Cabling to the PM1's is by six core alarm cable. I found this at Rapid Electronics. Self contained, available as a 100m drum for less than £20. Make sure you check the tolerances before ordering as they have several types available. That is all for now, my next post will be a how I done it for the installation of the point motors. Hope that you like. Del
  3. del00

    A new start

    Continuing on as I posted by mistake while trying to find out how an indent had appeared. So, 9mm ply with 44mm X 44mm legs and 12mm X 44mm edges and bracing. This photo also shows the hatch at the bottom explaining the need for 1ft wide ply boards. The baseboards were installed without too many dramas, as long as you don't look too closely. Then came the underlay for the track. As before I went to Wickes and purchased a lot of cork tiles. These are 3mm deep and 305mm X 305mm squares, they can be cut very easily using a stanley knife. This is then adhered to the baseboards using good old PVA glue, they are then clamped or weighted down and left for 24hrs to set. Starting with the run around/ hidden section I then started to lay the track. Yay, my first piece of track. As you can see, I used track pins. The test layout track was glued down with PVA. This started to come away from the cork due to the heat. This occurred after ballasting so became a big problem. Despite the temperatures in the loft, so far the track has all stayed in place. This is all for now, weather permitting I will be back in the sauna, freezer, loft this weekend and will post progress next week.
  4. del00

    A new start

    Hi, I thought it time to post my progress so far. A while back (6 years) I started a thread about a test layout that I was building. This layout was purely so that I could see what I was doing wrong or right. The layout only got so far and so posting stopped. I have been granted access to the loft for my second attempt, so hopefully all that I have learnt from previous attempts will not be in vain. I shall try and give as much detail as possible when describing how I have done things, please feel free to comment and add constructive advice. The layout is approx 13ft X 8ft. SCARM diagram below. This is on 2ft X 8ft 9mm ply for the most part, the section going around the loft hatch is only 1ft wide so that you can still get in and out of the loft. This leaves a good sized space in the middle for work and operation. The first issue was that the plan needed to be flipped due to the hatch. The second issue is that the green track was going to be a raised level, but the inclines would have been too steep, so it is now a pancake. I can cope with this. So, what is shown on the left of the plan, is now on the right. The layout will feature a mainline through station with island platforms, a second station/halt on the opposite side with a loading depot and TMD. The track running around the outside of the plan is a non-scenic run around and will be hidden. The first thing that became apparent about the test layout was that the construction of the baseboard did not need to be so industrial. The use of 12mm chipboard, 44mm X 44mm and 100mm X 25mm bracing was completely over the top. Chipboard is not the easiest material to screw into and the bracing obstructed the underside preventing use of hidden point motors among other things. I have used 9mm ply, with 44mm X 44mm legs and 12mm X 44mm edging and bracing were needed.
  5. Thanks for clearing that up Ian, I was a bit confused myself. I use impact adhesive, a bit hardcore but effective. Sorry Pirouets, but the card in Hobbycraft, certainly the Romford branch, is Daler mounting board and is 1.5mm or 0.75mm. I used this originally, but wanted something a bit more accurate. ta del00
  6. I agree, the cost is not cheap, but it is foamboard, and it is 1mm and 2mm as required by scalescenes kits. While searching, I look at the guys that you buy from, but 5mm is too deep, regardless of price. del00
  7. Sorry, did not include link http://www.foamboardonline.co.uk/STAR_BUYS/?sortmethod=name&page=2 ta del00
  8. Hi Kenton, I've been using foamboard when building scalescenes kits. Got tired with width of card not to spec. You say you've got some already but want to know what the result are like, look at my layout thread. inc link to where I buy foamboard from. Delivery was prompt and all packed in two bits of 5mm board. Ideal for scenary (bridges etc). hope this helps rgds del00
  9. Hi Kevin, Just to stick my oar in, I've found Model Rails review of rolling stock to be very helpful. The 2010 copy is out soon. ta deloo
  10. del00

    Its a Test

    Locos, As you may already has guessed, there is no location or period for this layout, I run what I like, which is not much ATM. First buys were all about getting some kind of DCC traction on the layout. The prime factor was budget. These loco's were from split packs and pre-installed chips. Again harping back to history, the choice was Hornby, the railroad range. First up, the 47 Dionysis. Shown above alongside my other purchase at the time, 08 D4093. These have the older Hornby chip and need hardwiring to be replaced, a job for later. The 08 runs very intermittantly, often reseting itself back to id0003. Possibly due to poor contact with the pickups. Coaches to go with the 47 are old recovered from the loft BR MK2's, possibly LIMA. Then came the Patriot, Royal Leicestershire Regiment 45503. A very good looking loco, bought with 3 LMS burgundy coaches. This has had the detail remove, as it was fouling on the curves. Then the 33 from Heljan was bought. This was nice and cheap from Hattons. A beautiful runner. Seen at the goods shed with old Hornby wagons. I plan to buy some railfreight VGA's to go with this. For the moment these will do. Brake is a shark in Stratford depot livery. Last up so far is the Bacchy 108DMU in green with whiskers, which for some reason I do not have any photo's of, but can be glimpsed at the back of a shot from my first post. Future plans involve replacing both the 47 and 08 and the BR coaches. Also adding the 4CEP in blue and grey from Bachmann. I think that will be enough as there will be a lack of space, even for storing on the layout. A few extras as usual. Waiting for funds to add barbed wire from Ten Commandments to the fence from Ratio. Hope you all enjoy ta del00
  11. Hi Jimmy, Looks like plenty of room. Will be keeping an eye on the updates. Aarrhh the joys of using the loft, one day it will be all mine. I can but dream. del00
  12. Skip and pallets look particularly neglected. Perfect. Am I right in seeing that there are rain puddles there? How did you get the effect? Love the reclamation by nature. del00
  13. This is well worth the hassle from PaulRHB. You should be happy to shout about the quality of your work. If you have more photo's, please post, I can see this being very influential. Thanks Hampshire Hog:D del00
  14. del00

    Its a Test

    addendum, the link for the foamboard should be http://www.foamboardonline.co.uk/STAR_BUYS/?sortmethod=name&page=2 ta del00
  15. del00

    Its a Test

    This is the reason why the blog will not work for me, too long between posts. I have a couple of days off work so am able to relax and play. Buildings. All buildings ATM are Scalescenes. I cannot recommend these enough. I cannot vouch for the prototypicality (is that a word), but they do look good. These suit me down to the ground. Having looked at layouts with Metcalfe, I was deeply unimpressed with the white corners and edges plus what you buy is what you build. I used Superquick all those years back when first into modelling trains. They appear not to have changed at all. The benefits of scalescenes are, an amount of detail not matched by any other model yet seen. If there are alternatives, I will gladly look. I cannot be bothered to spend the time that others do adding detail brick by brick. I applaud those that have the patience for this. Once bought, the models can be printed as many times as you like, either because an error has been made, or because you want mutiple/extended buildings. As opined in other threads, I am sceptical about the depth of morter joints on embossed card, if .3mm=1inch, thats a mighty deep morter joint. But the main thing here is the price. The engine shed and goods shed are built using card. I could not find any the correct depth, so ended up using foamboard, http://www.foamboardonline.co.uk/Display_Board I have seen others using fibreboard. I will try this for later models as the foamboard can be difficult to cut and blunts scalpel blades very quickly. The first building shown is the Gable Roof Engine Shed. The concrete base is as provided. I have built the edges up so that there is little or no slope. Measure the depth of the sleeper and provide card accordingly! As you can see, the detail is carried through into the buildings themselves. There is even print detail for the windows, with the added option of frames by Brassmasters. In front of this will be a fuelling point, deciding between Bacchy and Knightwing. The concrete pan will be extended either way. Next up the Goods Shed. Due to the time taken to fix the camera, this building has already been natured. The tufts are by Noch, clumps by Woodland Scenics, 'buddleia' by Mininatur and scatter by Hornby. I have taken ques from the buildings I see around me in London. and signed. All from Ten Commandments. and further detailed. Gutters and downpipes by Ratio and drain covers by Wizard Models, pallets by Modelscene and Ten Commandments. The accurate ballasting was acheived by siting the building, marking out and then being pedantic with the ballast. Only the CCTV to add really. Next is the station. Platforms, as per remit, there is an experiment here. ATM, ground tarmac is provided by messrs wet and dry. This can be effective, but only up to a point. The platforms are built to my spec, two of. Construction of the base is standard for the type, here with a bulge for the station building, and on the right with the termination of this line, yet to be buffered. On the right is the attempt at the platform surface using wet and dry, edging tiles as provided by scalesecenes and yellow lines taken from a popular texture site, resized and joined in photoshop. These are 1mm thick are I think quite effective. I was disappointed with the 'tarmac' so tried using the tarmac sheets provided. With the addition of the covers from Wizzard Models, the edging and line, I think this is almost convincing. I should have gone wih the smaller channel covers. This is not finished yet. The building is from the big station set, the main terminus is for later as that will be on the tunnel with the platform footbridge providing access to the platforms. I will post that later. I am not using the roof cover. As a whole this has enabled me to stage photo's such as the ones below. I hope you enjoy, ta del00
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