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dajt

NSW 24 class mogul in 5" gauge

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A few more photos, I took some of things you should never see once a loco is in service. I was prompted to take the photo through the regulator bush after having a look in there and noticing lots of light was making its way in. While looking in there I was able to see the blower tube is okay after we had to push the backhead bush in due to (I assume) the smokebox tubeplate end falling back during soldering, and I also saw a huge gap in the solder seam between the backhead and outer wrapper. You can't see that in the photo.

 

I also decided I'd do the sealing up on the cylinders soon so took off a cover to have a look in there and clean up for a gasket. I took a couple of photos in there for people to see how close the piston comes to the ends of the bore.

 

Regards, David.

 

 

The blast pipe and blower ring.

 

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Inside the smokebox. From left to right the snifter valve, blast pipe, and the short fitting that connects the superheater output to the steam chest inlet manifold.

 

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Piston at the front and then the back.

 

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Inside the boiler. You can see the blower tube top left, the crown of the firebox and the tubes.

 

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Two months have passed but the boiler is finished! A great relief. Much time was spent chasing leaks around the stays and the firebox tubeplate. When I was soldering the stays inside the firebox I noticed too late the solder on the tubeplate had melted and no doubt caused chaos. There was a big one in a corner of the foundation ring too but much heat and solder saw it plugged up.

 

It isn't as pretty as a professionally made one, but it was probably a lot cheaper.

 

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Work stops now while I sell the existing steel garage and get a new brick, fully insulated workshop built in its place. That should be pretty luxurious!

 

I might try and learn to spray paint and do the tender underframe while that's going on.

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Two months have passed but the boiler is finished! A great relief. Much time was spent chasing leaks around the stays and the firebox tubeplate. When I was soldering the stays inside the firebox I noticed too late the solder on the tubeplate had melted and no doubt caused chaos. There was a big one in a corner of the foundation ring too but much heat and solder saw it plugged up.

 

It isn't as pretty as a professionally made one, but it was probably a lot cheaper.

 

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Work stops now while I sell the existing steel garage and get a new brick, fully insulated workshop built in its place. That should be pretty luxurious!

 

I might try and learn to spray paint and do the tender underframe while that's going on.

 

Forget about being pretty David, it's functional and superbly made, enough said :)

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Thanks John :)

 

With 3+ mm copper and 1/8" stays it should withstand anything!

 

I'm trying something called Loctite 510 to seal the dome and regulator flanges. It is a 'flange sealant' and is meant to work up to 200 deg c. Apparently a boiler at 100psi is about 170 or 180 deg c so it should take it.

 

It took the 200psi of the hydro test fine, but of course that was cool water.

 

I was looking at a Polly boiler the other day, they are very neatly put together. I assume they have steel formers and presses etc to form them but lord knows how the builder can solder so nicely.

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Agree would be nice to see an update, Im sure he is rebuilding his Garage thou, So we may have to wait,

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Hi all, good to be back!

 

The new workshop (can't really call it a shed, it's nicer than my house) was finished about a month ago, but much time has been spent moving stuff back in, moving machines around, etc. Not finished by a long shot but I want to get back on with some modeling, it's been a long autumn/winter waiting for the thing to be finished. A view of the 1/4 of the workshop where the bench and big machines are:

 

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So I finally brought the mogul back from where it was resting in Father-in-law's workshop. The last couple of days have seen holes drilled and rivets put in the little plate in front of the smokebox, and some tapped holes behind the buffer beam to fix it in place. Then I spotted, drilled, and tapped holes in the smokebox sides below footplate level to fix it to the frames.

 

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I did manage to rebuild the milling machine gearbox after the workshop walls and roof went on but before it was finished. New gears, new bearings, new gear selector handles, new bearing dust caps (made to be easily removable) and fine-tuned fine-feed mechanism which has got rid of a tight-spot and made it smoother to operate. I also had to replace the start capacitor on the lathe motor and the run capacitor on the mill motor. The mill still needs the DRO and X-axis feed motor put back on. But that was it for the whole of winter.

 

I have made some nameplates for my freelance 0-4-0 but haven't put them on yet. I'll bring it home after the next running day.

 

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Regards, David.

 

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This week was spent reducing a large amount of cast iron to dust, leaving some sandboxes. I made them from solid rather than fabricating because it is easier. I still need to round off the corners and make 3 detail bits per side that represent lids, inspection hatches, etc. The drawing also shows a big cavity in the bottom to lighten them a bit. I'm going to use that as an exercise on my new CNC machine to learn how to do pocketing.

 

The CNC was good for cutting the cast iron down. Last time I did this (the crossheads I think) it took me a day or two standing at the machine getting it down to size. This time after I had arrived at good settings I could start it off, go inside to work for 2 hours, come back, flip over, repeat. Still took a day but I didn't have to stand there cranking the handles.

 

Trimming them to size lengthwise, putting the angled face on, and drilling the holes were still done on the manual mill. The 4th photo shows how I used the first one machined to get the same angle on the second one.

 

Regards, David.

 

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Not much progress, I put the weight-saving pockets in the bottom of the sandboxes. I used the CNC mill to do it so I could learn how pocketing works. I drilled a bunch of 1/4, then 3/8 holes almost to depth and then let the 10mm slot drill get into it. F360 suggested speed and feed was a bit aggressive looking to me so I backed them right off and it still went way harder than I would have manually.

 

Did a good job though. Dimensionally it isn't great, within about 6-8 thou which I'd have expected a CNC machine to do better than. But that could be because I told it not to bother leaving any material of doing a finish pass or anything like that. It's not critical so I just wanted it done quickly.

 

Now I have got the lathe back on the ground I need to refill the carriage with oil then I can make a start on brake parts or detail parts for the sandboxes.

 

David.

 

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looking great David.....weight is a good thing...except when you have to lift it...:)

 

Pete

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I spent the weekend making the front and mid pedestals for the brake hangers, plus the crossbeams at the bottom. The brake hangers were laser cut and have not been cleaned up yet.

 

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I've started machining a cast ring of brakeshoes but they're a generic shape and nothing like the prototype. I'm going to have to make a to-scale drawing from the plans I have so I can print it out, stick it to the casting, and think about how to get there. It isn't obvious at this point.

 

Tonight I decided to see if I could get the new machine to do the corner radii on the sandboxes. I was pleased with the result. In the photo I have left one as it comes off the machine and the other after about 10 mins with sandpaper. I don't have corner rounding end mills (which seem to be the magic words, roundover mills always brings up router cutters), so these were done with a normal 12mm 4 flute endmill. Took about 20 minutes for each box, and two set-ups. The radius around the top is 1/8", and down the front edges is 4mm.

 

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Regards, David.

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The brake shoes are nearly done. I'm not sure I'll use castings again for this, at least not for asymmetrical ones like these.

 

The cast ring was nicely concentric and I probably only took a .5mm cut which went through the skin and left no rough areas. That's not the usual experience with castings and I appreciated it.

 

Luckily I couldn't fit 6 shoes into 8 generic brake areas as I'd first printed them out. If that had worked they'd all be for one side! Dumb luck meant I had to reverse 3 of them giving me the correct 3 per side... that was close. This was only a problem because I did the 3deg coning on the wheels.

 

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This was a long job with a lot of sawing and turning and milling and fettling and general stuffing around. I'm glad they're done except for rounding the inside edge to give clearance for the flange root and probably deepening the slots where the hangers go. I also have to drill clearance on the outside for each bolt that holds them to the hangers.

 

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I spent a few hours mucking about seeing if a jig for the rotary table would be an easy way to mill the non-concentric curve where the shoe meets the body. It all got too annoying and I figured I may as well use the CNC mill given I'd already drawn them in CAD to figure the radii and arc centers (for the rotary table jig), and print and glue them to the cast ring. I didn't have a great grip on the parts in the vise but got away with it. By the time I was halfway through I had a system going to position the parts which made things quick and easy from then on. The actual cutting was only 1m 20s per side and I was going very slow because I didn't trust the vise holding.

 

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After I've rounded the inside edges and adjusted the hanger slots as necessary I can put the front two sets on and measure up the pull rod length.

 

David.

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Fitted the front two brake shoes and measured up for the pull rods. 156.5mm one side, 158.2mm the other :-\

 

Quite a lot had to be taken out of the hanger slots to allow the top of the shoes to sit against the wheels. An electric die grinder saw to that, and was also used to add clearance for the flange root. A small flap wheel in an electric drill cleaned up the hangers themselves.

 

Still about 6 hours work but none of it particularly difficult.

 

David.

 

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On the plus side I made the front pull rods for the brakes last night and they fit fine. I broke a 2mm endmill but they're cheap enough from China it doesn't bug me anymore. If it had been the $30 one a local engineering supply shop sold me I'd be a bit put out. I superglued the 1.6mm steel to a piece of MDF covered with masking tape, and also held it down with the usual clamps. This worked pretty well and I didn't notice much lifting of the stock during cutting which can be a problem for me with thin sheets and long parts.

 

I'd been putting off mounting the bracket for the rear brakes as every time I've had to mount a bracket between frame and running boards it has been a horrible job. This time was no exception. I spent a LONG time here and there over the last few days measuring, scribing, lining up, etc. And then of course drilled holes don't go where they should and you're jammed into a corner. Literally in this case so I can't get a spanner head or nut runner around the bolt head to tighten it and the hex jams anyway :angry:.

 

As the photo shows I was going to jam nuts on there and screw in from the back. Having cropped the photo of the bracket I can see the running board screws ended up on the web too. I think I might scrap the current angles and put new ones on. If I get the clearance holes for the screws right this time I should still be good on the top and will save myself future headaches when trying to get the brackets on and off.

 

I really hate brackets with 1/4 angle under the running boards. There is never enough room with work with, you can't see everything you need to at once, you need to get them lined up with the underside of the running board and you need to get them square in 3 planes. Just horrible things. And I still have the other side to go!

 

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David.

 

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Got the rear brake brackets wrestled into place. I ended up slotting the clearance holes to give myself some wriggle room. I'm running out of pride at this point and finding the expedient solutions attractive! I did have to plug and re-drill the holes for the footplate bolts on the first one I did because they pulled it out of place.

 

About 6 hours to make the 4 little rectangular bits the hangers go between. I have no idea how I can be so slow but it really did take that long.

 

Pull rods presented no particular hassle except trying to measure what the distance between the bosses should be. Didn't quite get it but it should be close enough to let a shoe or two bear on a wheel tread. Surely the prototype had adjustment via threads? Or could the shoe holders themselves be shimmed somehow?

 

Spent a little while tonight filing a couple of mm off the 8BA bolts to make them look neat where they come out of the blocks. Was watching the latest Project Binky on YouTube so that was fun. I tried making them a couple of days ago but after looking at the 'hexagons' I'd filed on them I decided to wait a couple of days and buy them.

 

David.

 

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A simple enough part yesterday and today, a dummy brake cylinder.

 

I was lucky and found the perfect offcut. About 5mm too long and 2mm over the largest diameter of the part!

 

First job was to turn down the 10mm dia x 11mm length boss on one side which I could then hold in a 5C collet to do the rest of the turning. I don't get to use the collets much and they can be tricky because the gap piece for the lathe bed didn't come with a piece of carriage traversal rack so sometimes the carriage comes off the rack being so far towards the headstock. This time I wound the topslide as far forward as I could and had no trouble.

 

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Then over to the mill to put a bit of a flat on for the plate that mounts it to the frame. The flange is also cut flat to clear the cylinder drain operating rod. You can't notice it once it is on the loco. I marred the part quite a lot while trying different options for holding it before arriving at the one in the photo with the 10x11 boss in the hole of a parallel. The first hiccup was starting to mill the flange down too much. I got about halfway through it before realising. This was a benign failure as it just meant I had to make the flat mounting plate a bit longer to compensate.

 

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Then the second hiccup. I'd forgotton to cut the 'separation line' in the middle of the flange representing where the two components were bolted together. So back to the lathe and an interrupted cut to add that in.

 

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Back to the mill to spot the bolt holes around the flange. A near miss where I set Y=0 against the wrong part but I just touched the drill down without the spindle running as a sanity check and thought it looked to be in the wrong place which prompted me to rethink what I'd done. Spotting went well after the correct Y=0 was set.

 

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The bolt holes are drilled 10BA clearance.

 

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Now the mounting plate. I didn't have any dimensions for the 6 dummy mounting bolts so there was a bit of trial and error with scribed lines and nuts to get something that looked right. The studs are from a few 10BA brass screws. They're held in place with nuts, then a 2nd brass nut put on to space out a cut with a piercing saw to cut them to length. I would love to have used brass nuts but didn't have six of them so had to go with steel.

 

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Solder them together. It's quite a lump of brass to heat up but done with soft solder and should be good enough. The real mounting bolts go through from between the loco frames into the back of the cylinder so they will hold it all together as well.

 

Two steps forward and one back again as I forgot to take the brass spacing nut off and managed to leave it in the most difficult place from which to undo it.

 

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The red stain is left by the phosphoric acid flux. I got most of it off with a wire wheel in a die grinder but can't get into where the cylinder and mounting plate join. The photos show it in the groove but that's gone. I don't want to put it in the pickle because it might eat away at the steel nuts before it's done cleaning the flux away. So hope for the best, hope the paint sticks, and if it doesn't this is hidden away under the running boards anyway!

 

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The part looks simple, and is. But there are just enough odd shapes that trying to visualise it from the drawings and do all the machining operations in the right order while trying to push on still allowed me to make the requisite number of stuff-ups!

 

David.

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More simple shiny bits. A couple of brackets to hold the brake shaft in position. Nothing tricky here but was pleased when drilling 2 x 1.45mm holes 20mm deep didn't cause some sort of hiccup. I used a home made silver steel reamer to clean up the holes for the shaft.

 

Regards, David.

 

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Brakes are almost done. The rear pull rods put up a hell of a fight and there were some tense moments making the cross shaft with the captured bush on it. Only the handbrake parts and some missing cosmetic cotter pins to go. The handbrake can wait until I do the cab if I feel like putting it off.

 

Cylinder drain linkages and brackets next.

 

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Regards, David.

 

 

 

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The cylinder drains are going well. Left side done aside from tidying up. The right side will be tricky as the threaded hole in the arm on the cross shaft filled with silver solder and I didn't feel like tackling that today.

 

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The clevis on the front of the operating rod was made up as I went along, with a sub-optimal machining sequence but came out ok in the end! The other end of the operating rod has an eye silver soldered to it. I had to file a notch in the lever that operates the drains because one of the mounting bolts for the dummy brake cylinder foul it before it has full travel. I wondered whether I had to move the bolts forward from the center line of the cylinder when I was mounting it and thought 'no, it'll be ok'. Hah!

 

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I also added the dummy cotters to the bolts that go through the brake hangers. I never got around to it when doing the brakes.

 

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The last couple of months has seen the loco brakes and cylinder drains done, and a start made on the leaf springs. A Ewins-type lubricator is also almost done, but still needs the roller clutches and driving arm.

 

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Meanwhile the tender for the freelance 0-4-0 is in bits, the entire water feed path is being redone and the inside of the tank and the coal space liberally coated in bitumen paint in yet another attempt to stop the chronic injector blocking problem.

 

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Regards, David.

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David instead of   paint  have you considered  fibre glassing the inside of the tank and coal space ?

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