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Skinnylinny

Great Southern Railway (Fictitious) - Furlough Projects

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Two things are going on here, scale and dirt/distress. 

 

To represent black at scale, it should not be pure black, but muted. Add just white, and it leads to too pure a grey. So, I use a 'bone white' to tone down the black.

 

Gloss does not scale.  For high gloss at scale something more satin in finish is required.

 

For a permanently dirty black area, like an underframe, I 'pre-weather' by painting black mixed with up to 50% earth brown.  This gives a dirty black at scale effect.  

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27 minutes ago, Andy Hayter said:

I tend to be cautious with white in black because it is only then that you find whether the black is based on blue, green, brown or black.

I find adding a little grey to the black, instead of white, produces a much better result for black ironwork, underframes etc.

 

Jim

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Quote

a wash of half-and-half Humbrol metalcote 201 metallic black and Humbrol 33 matt black

 

Not quite.  27004 is my weapon of choice, Metalcote black.  It can be polished when dry so you get that slightly shiny effect through the dirt.  I mix with 33, 64 (light grey) and 62 (Leather).  112 Tarmac is also a possibility although the formulation seems to have changed since it became available again and it's not so blue.  Revell 67 (I think) is better.

 

None of this is my idea - it's all in Martyn Welch's The Art of Weathering, a book which I cannot recommend highly enough.

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Humbrol coal black and matt dark earth, in 2:1 proportions, looks good, too. Barry Norman uses this combination.

1471201170_Number5crop.jpg.d87019b87225f8249e84935620bf34f5.jpg

 

 

 

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I do have a copy of The Art of Weathering, although given it's a book on painting and colour usage, I find it very strange that 90% of the photos of weathered models and the processes involved are in black and white! I must have another read through it at some point... (Those last three words are becoming a recurring theme in this thread).

Thanks to all for the advice, plenty of things to think about there.

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11 hours ago, Regularity said:

Humbrol coal black and matt dark earth, in 2:1 proportions, looks good, too. Barry Norman uses this combination.

1471201170_Number5crop.jpg.d87019b87225f8249e84935620bf34f5.jpg

 

 

 

 

On my monitor, that has a purplish hue - is that the intention? It does look good. Very cast iron.

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22 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

 

On my monitor, that has a purplish hue - is that the intention? It does look good. Very cast iron.

Just a bit of “polishing” from handling, I think.

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Lifecolor do a very nice range of acrylics, with shades of black, which I mix to get smokebox and frame weathering. They are better quality than the current Humbrol, thinner , but brush on well. This one is the basis of my palette.

 

Edited - couldn't get a link to work, but look for set LC- CS527 Shades of black.

 

https://airbrushes.com/product_info.php?cPath=400_4_429_202_203_549&products_id=21235

Edited by Ben Alder
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Well, the question of weathering the wagons got a little more urgent: 

Wagons.jpg.568c7f61dfc2a460d3868bb3c702b015.jpg

Being Slaters kits, they pretty well fell together, and now they just need the insides painting, some tension-locks fitting and some coal loads. Both of these were built at the club meet this evening. 

A dive into the archives brings up this photograph, from The Great Southern Railway in Photographs (Achingham Press, 1987)

20191205_182410.jpg

LSWR 0415 Class no 487 delivering what would later become GSR Family Saloon no. 37 to the works at Linton, June 17 1897. History does not record the source of this carriage, as the ledgers for that year were lost in the fire of 1917.
 

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And enough stealing of the club layout for backdrops - my photoplank layout got moved to the new flat today. Couldn't resist plonking some buildings and stock on it, although I realise I still haven't finished half the scenery on it yet.  Still, another step towards getting the new place more homely. Now, time to clean up and pack up that 3D printer...

20191208_141639.jpg

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Well, after another weekend of moving, what better way to spend a quiet evening than in some wanton destruction with screwdriver and hacksaw?

The soon-to-be family saloon was dismantled, to find there were partitions between compartments, and seats in the end coupe compartments. I've kept some of these for now, removing the ones which separated the saloon into two compartments. The glazing was one strip of acetate per side, held in place by the partitions, so this was cut through with a scalpel and removed from the saloons. 

 

Untitled.jpg.0114d3d8641b2d619ffe16d35b487e2c.jpg

 

The footboard that came adrift has since been reattached. However, I had to wait until I got home to my hacksaw before the next stage could continue - removing the columns in the middle of the saloon compartment. This has now been done, and the bolection mouldings need a little dressing with a file, but we're starting to get there... 

 

Untitled1.jpg.0d55677b07832b9f6cdb176306670db4.jpg

 

This has made me ponder a potential change to the GSR carriage livery, however - I'm considering whether it would be appropriate to pick out the window frames/bolection mouldings in white, to give a more continuous area of white between the waist and top panels, especially where long lights are used. I had also noticed that on my corridor conversion of one of the clerestories, I wasn't happy with how little white there was to be seen around the windows. Thoughts would be very welcome. As a reminder of the current livery:


post-793-0-23113800-1517062836.png

Edited by Skinnylinny
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12 minutes ago, Skinnylinny said:

Well, after another weekend of moving, what better way to spend a quiet evening than in some wanton destruction with screwdriver and hacksaw?

The soon-to-be family saloon was dismantled, to find there were partitions between compartments, and seats in the end coupe compartments. I've kept some of these for now, removing the ones which separated the saloon into two compartments. The glazing was one strip of acetate per side, held in place by the partitions, so this was cut through with a scalpel and removed from the saloons. 

 

Untitled.jpg.0114d3d8641b2d619ffe16d35b487e2c.jpg

 

The footboard that came adrift has since been reattached. However, I had to wait until I got home to my hacksaw before the next stage could continue - removing the columns in the middle of the saloon compartment. This has now been done, and the bolection mouldings need a little dressing with a file, but we're starting to get there... 

 

Untitled1.jpg.0d55677b07832b9f6cdb176306670db4.jpg

 

This has made me ponder a potential change to the GSR carriage livery, however - I'm considering whether it would be appropriate to pick out the window frames/bolection mouldings in white, to give a more continuous area of white between the waist and top panels, especially where long lights are used. I had also noticed that on my corridor conversion of one of the clerestories, I wasn't happy with how little white there was to be seen around the windows. Thoughts would be very welcome. As a reminder of the current livery:


post-793-0-23113800-1517062836.png

 Blue with white upper panels id @Nile's LMWR livery. Green with white upper panels looks very smart but is also already taken - WNR - if that bothers you. Claret's a good all-round all-over livery but a bit commonplace. How about claret with cream upper panels? 

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Unfortunately, blue with white upper panels has been my carriage livery for a while - I've already got a fair few carriages repainted in said livery! It is to match the locomotives, which are also in a matching blue - an approximation of GER livery. That being said, would not claret and white be ripping off the Caledonian? Or claret and cream the LNWR?

I'm aware of Nile's LMWR livery - I believe a while back there was a "snap!" moment - both of us seem to have nicked the idea from the Furness. That being said, there are many examples of railways with similar liveries - how many railways had varnished teak, for example? Or shades of maroon?

Edited by Skinnylinny
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i think the only pre-grouping carriages I have seen where the mouldings on the upper sides are light to match the panels are the GCR stock built for the London Extension. Brown lower panels, french grey upper panels. They rapidly moved to teak all over which suggests they didn't wear too well. People might think they look too modern as everybody else had mouldings picked out.

mslr carriages.jpg

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The CR coach livery was officially purple brown and white.  The bolections were mahogany with the recess between them and the beading white.

 

 

 

Jim

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Although the raised mouldings are the same colour as the panels, there is lining between the two.

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however in none of these cases are the bolections and window frames pale: all are varnished wood, or wood colour. White frames and bolections sounds a bit colonial.

 

Edited by webbcompound
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To clarify, I was meaning to keep the mouldings blue, but pick out only the bolection mouldings (or even only the outer part of them) in white. Something along the lines of this (and yes, I realise these are all droplights, rather than bolections...)

 

lnwr_no112l.jpg

Edited by Skinnylinny
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GNoSR livery was similiar in style to the GCR chocolate brown and French grey but the colours were crimson lake and white; yellow lining:

 

image.png.a588f4e845d593cd79f3b47354f304ec.png

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2 hours ago, Skinnylinny said:

To clarify, I was meaning to keep the mouldings blue, but pick out only the bolection mouldings (or even only the outer part of them) in white. Something along the lines of this (and yes, I realise these are all droplights, rather than bolections...)

 

 

The white bits are actually vestigial panelling round the large windows. made more confusing by the superwidth "beading" above the windows. The window surrounds (bolection or droplight) on LNWR coaches were always wood colour, never white. You can see it more clearly in this view of the end of the Royal Diner

lnwr diner.jpg

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I think when you paint your saloon it won't look as bad because the waist panels on your brake are painted white so I'm guessing the same will apply to the saloon, and for some reason some of the upper panelling has been painted brown on the saloon, which I'm thinking will also be white in your livery. You could also paint your ventilator hoods white perhaps

 

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In which case, I wonder if I could get away with "vestigial panelling" in white around my windows, and leave the bolection mouldings in varnished wood. Might need a very fine paintbrush though...

 

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Go for it! However I have to say that GWR stuff is prone to look much darker than the cream we expect. Look at this concertina stock coach (Marc's Models kit). You can see your very thin white panel round the windows though.

 

marce80large.jpg

Edited by webbcompound
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