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So to complement my ever increasing collection of Hornby Caledonian pugs (12 and still going) I thought I'd have a go at bodging an open wagon into a tender as was often coupled to these engines.  I picked up a Lima 7 plank wagon cheaply (it had been repainted into a pink-grey colour) and cut it down - 2 planks high at the rear, and 4 planks high for the actual coal carrying part, based off of pictures of these tenders.  I'm aware that it's too long, and the chassis style is too modern but it's a start.  I plan to build another more prototypical one later, and this will be based off the size of my still to be completed True Line Models Diagram 22 wagon post-32037-0-31657100-1528992451_thumb.jpgpost-32037-0-05990200-1528992469_thumb.jpgpost-32037-0-66611900-1528992497_thumb.jpgpost-32037-0-79163400-1528992526_thumb.jpg

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This is a very satisfying small project which really enhances the look of the 'Pug'. I recently did the same thing using an open wagon which I scratchbuilt onto a Triang chassis over 40 years ago. I will follow your build with interest.

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Hi Booking Hall, I removed all the brake gear from the wagon I used (thinking it was all too 'modern' looking) and once I came to adding detail regretted that decision - my plan for the next few tenders will be to retain the brake gear on one side.  I've added running boards to mine now, and a big crude lever and making a start on a coal load currently building up the base with any scraps that are lying around. 

 

  I'm planning on attending the Perth show this Saturday, so will see what wagon wrecks there are going for a reasonable price - tender No 1 will likely be finished for BR days (just need to pick up a liveried BR pug now!), and then I'll need to make a tender the LMS and Caledonian (probably the only difference being LMS and CR on the tender).  Looking at a Triang chassis just now, it is ~5mm shorter than the Lima chassis so more ideal for representing the prototype, if I can pick up a few chassis I'll look at 3D printing the bodies or have parts laser cut. Alternatively if I find some suitable axleboxes I'll do the chassis (short dumb buffer type) in laser ply.

 

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Picked up more pugs and some bits from the CR association stand including a set of outside W  irons. An underframe has now been laser cut in ply so it's just a case of seeing how the parts come together - the underframe is significantly shorter than any rtr wagons I have so will hopefully give that antiquated touch

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Picked up more pugs and some bits from the CR association stand including a set of outside W  irons. An underframe has now been laser cut in ply so it's just a case of seeing how the parts come together - the underframe is significantly shorter than any rtr wagons I have so will hopefully give that antiquated touch

Looking forward to seeing this develop.

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  Pictures of the parts for the early style tender 

 

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Unfortunately the laser cut chassis seems to be too wide to use, though I'll see if it's possible to modify it to fit.  At worst i need to cut a narrower chassis and I'm cutting parts next week so I'll add this to my list (plenty of scraps to use anyway)

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  • Caley 439 changed the title to Caley 439's workbench

  Been all quiet on here for a year! Towards the end of last summer I picked up an old Hornby Midland Compound which looked like it had been stripped back in preparation for super detailing.  This has been bodged into a take on the Highland Railway Loch class (in condition as rebuilt by the LMS), planning to do it as 14385 Loch Tay, the last survivor of the class, which passed into BR ownership though never received her BR number .

 

  Have renamed the topic as I'll use this as a general page for my bodges of ready to run items into Scottish pre-grouping locos and stock

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More recently at the Perth show last weekend I picked up another CR type pug, in a rather sorry state.  Chimney broken off, no motor, and as I discovered when home only one pick-up.  Picked up with a good condition Tri-ang wagon chassis (for a 2nd tender) for a very reasonable price, and this seemed perfect for an idea I've had in my mind for a while - conversion to a North British Railway G class. Basically the NBR equivalent of the Caley's pugs

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So on Monday a chimney design was drawn out in AutoCAD, and test printed. A rough drawing was done for the overhanging cab roof and this was drawn out in AutoCAD and test printed this morning - a pretty good job straight off! Now stuck on to the loco (chimney not yet glued on though).  Water filler cap has been cut off and will be reattached behind the dome.  Also did a stovepipe chimney design for possible future acquisitions (when found to be missing a chimney)

 

  

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Thanks Oliver, regarding the previous posts the first pug tender is finished though still to finish off the coal load in it - currently just bits of scraps glued in and painted as a base before adding some actual coal and scatter.  It's a bit rough but does the job (weathering will hopefully cover up the worst of it), the 2nd one with the laser cut frames has stalled as I've managed to misplace the frames - the etched W irons are safely packaged.

 

  I'm hoping that the G class conversion will be the first of several LNER-constituent company builds.  At Perth I also picked up a set of plans for a NBR K class (the Glen Class) and suitable tender from the NB study group,  and a CD of self print kits for Great North of Scotland Railway buildings (everything from stations and engine shed down to a lamp hut) from the GNSR association stand.  As a result models (as preserved, so I can do the green livery for #49) of NBR 256 Glen Douglas and GNSR 49 Gordon Highlander  (GNSR F class, LNER D40) are on the cards.

 

  A similar idea as used by Londontram will be employed to modify each B12 chassis to create a  4-4-0 chassis - to only major hiccup currently is getting large wheels for the bogie for #49.  Hoping to get along to Bo'ness tomorrow and take a few pictures and dimensions of #49

 

 

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  Chassis parts arrived this morning, and so work began on #256 Glen Douglas.  First thing was to cut the B12 chassis down to a 4-4-0, measuring twice (and making sure it matched with the drawings) and cutting once!  A D49 bogie was used, as there were no B12 ones when I ordered the other parts, and a small amount of bodging was required for this to be attached to give a roughly scale wheelbase. 

 

Fortunately I found my stockpile of off-cuts of thick plastic sheet (~1.8mm) from when vacuum forming 16mm scale tipper wagons, and so a footplate was made up from this.  Need to see about picking up a suitable motor before making any serious progress with the cab and boiler, but can at least make a start on the front end of the loco and get cab sheets made up.  I'm expecting that the motor will take up a good chunk of the cab interior, though fairly the cab is a fairly enclosed design so this won't be seen too much (and similar situation for when doing #49 Gordon Highlander)

 

  In the meantime can make a start on the tenders for both engines - went to Bo'ness yesterday and took numerous pictures of #49, so all sorted for details on the tender and will try and pop along to the Riverside Museum at some point and detailed pictures of #256.

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Have made a new topic for the 4-4-0 builds (as really they are going to be almost entirely scratchbuilt)  

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/145967-pre-gouping-scottish-4-4-0s-most-of-the-time/

 

Anyway, another pug tender has been built on the chassis purchased at Perth.  Still to have external ironwork added then painted in some dark grime colour as per a picture I found online of a G class (LNER Y9) attached to a tender.

 

 

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Not perfect, but just about done.  Yes I've gone for hand lining which is nowhere near the best option - but I don't think there really was a different way of doing it.  This loco's been a good test bed for my own skills as well.  Still undecided on whether to fit dumb buffers in place as all the G class appear to have had them (and not had sprung buffers fitted, unlike their Caley compatriots) but his will require cutting through the cast buffers at the front.  We'll see, the problem is the more I look at prototype pictures then at the model the bigger the list of things gets:scenic:

 

  Have some transfers for the N   B  to put on either side of the saddle tank, and numbers for the bufferbeams too (if I go ahead with the hacksaw).  

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Next job: fit the new motor.  As unfortunately there was a pick-up missing when purchased, this will need to be sorted too.  Any issues with a brass pick-up to replace the missing one?

Edited by Caley 439
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Nice to see some proper modeling Caley 439 and am following with interest. I'm afraid poor health and some long spells in hospital have restricted my practical modeling at the moment but when my health improves I have several projects I would like to explore and reading your posts is helping to keep my interest stimulated. 

  Carry on the good work

     Steve

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  • 5 weeks later...

That you Steve, hope everything is going ok.  Your page on building items for your locos has been one of those which (particularly because of which company....) I go back to again and again.    The main difference (just now) is that I'm wanting to build other companies 4-4-0s, but overall the Caley is still the dominant force in my 00 fleet - 1 x class 19, 1 x 4-6-0 (seemed to be a take on Cardean, based on a B12 and B17, not working just now), and 3 x CR blue pugs - I know many people hate the Smokey Joe type pugs but I just like them for what they are. 

 

 

Now that I'm back home I''l be getting back to these projects. Whilst away, I picked up a magazine on railway modelling, and while the content inside wasn't quite what I'd hoped for I did spot that Hattons had Drummond 700s going for a very agreeable price - so a phone call was made and on arrival home several weeks later there it was.  A beautiful model, but I am thinking of how close is its dimensions to a Drummond Jumbo?  Or as a second option, a Highland Barney (with pictures of un-rebuilt 700s and of Barneys it can be difficult to tell which is which!)  to save on painting I would probably do it as one of the un-braked ones, or use just modellers licence 

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The 700 can only really be used as it is for the 812 and 652 classes as the boiler pitch is too high for the rest of the Jumbos and Hornby's design makes it difficult  to do much about lowering it; also it is too big for the smaller boilered Barneys to do an authentic conversion but I suppose it all swings on what you can live with as the 700 is a very good runner and ignoring a mm or two would give you  the basis for these locos.

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Good morning Ben Alder,  I took some measurements of the 700 last night and compared them again the dimensions of the Jumbo plans on the Alba Railway Models site.  Wheelbase isn't a problem, and the cab size seems close enough but the 700 length is ~12mm too long over the buffers - the running plate extends too far forward, I'm presuming that this extension was part of their rebuild when receiving extended smokeboxes?  For now I won't risk cutting the running plate back.  

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I've got four Jumbos at the moment One is scratch built on a Hornby chassis with a Modified Triang Caley single tender the base for the smoke box cab and features like the dome all came from a Great Brittish locos Caley single body. It's one great fault is its still got the Hornby 18mmm wheels where it should have 20mm wheels.

 

The second one My son got for me and I  think might be a DJH white metal kit built on an Airfix tender drive 4F chassis. It actually works very well and at least it's got the correct 20mm driving wheels.

 

 The third and forth are both early brass Jameson kits one is unstarted still in its box the other one someone has built the body and tender. There is a chassis with both but the power source is still undecided. Maybe romford 20mm wheels on a Hornby chassis we shall see.

 The 812 class falls just out side my time scale so it's not on the high priority build list but let's see what the future holds as like Richard I tend to build to a fairly flexible time zone with locos from 1880 to about 1905.

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Here is a quick phone shot of a Barney and my take on an 812 side by side. The smaller profile of the Barney can be clearly seen as can the too high boiler pitch of the masquerading 700 - the bottom of the boiler should be just below the top of the splashers. This is of course the most unforgiving angle to view this conversion- usually with the eye one is looking down on the layout and this extra height is not really noticeable. I did think at the time of lowering the pitch but the motor cradle is part of the under boiler and I decided it was too much extra work.

 

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1 hour ago, Ben Alder said:

Here is a quick phone shot of a Barney and my take on an 812 side by side. The smaller profile of the Barney can be clearly seen as can the too high boiler pitch of the masquerading 700 - the bottom of the boiler should be just below the top of the splashers. This is of course the most unforgiving angle to view this conversion- usually with the eye one is looking down on the layout and this extra height is not really noticeable. I did think at the time of lowering the pitch but the motor cradle is part of the under boiler and I decided it was too much extra work.

 

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Richard,

Is that an RTR chassis under the Barney?

I've got one built in HR green but I'm always on the lookout for another one and so keep a good eye on Ebay for an example unbuilt or otherwise. Chassis building isn't really my forte so every little helps!

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Richard

 

The Caley Class 30 was much the same as the 812 (likewise the Class 34 2-6-0 derivative) but the boiler was pitched 6" higher.  The Pickersgill Class 300 shared the same sizes boiler (albeit superheated) as well with the higher pitch.  Unfortunately, the domes and chimneys are shorter, the former quite a different shape.  Food for thought if another Black Motor comes your way.

 

Alan

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