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The South Buckinghamshire Light Railway


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Continuing to relay parts of the railway on stone blocks, about 30’ today. Also installed a bridge I built a couple of years ago that has been clogging up the workshop.

Here’s Peckett 0-4-0T ‘Betty’ doing a test run with a narrow gauge toad.

 

https://www.facebook.com/TheSouthBuckinghamshireLightRailway

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On 11/03/2019 at 01:24, south_tyne said:

Martino,

 

Very impressive stuff, cannot wait to see more of your railway. I love that Peckett! I'm not in any way jealous of your Florida location mind..... 

 

Indeed.  What a superb railway.  I followed your Facebook link to where you have scores of fine photos (somehow the most realistic ones often seem to be in black & white, but perhaps that's just my conditioning from too many old railway books!).  The pictures here are also most effective in showing how you've managed to capture just what an NG line might look like.  Thanks for sharing the very atmospheric results of your hard work.

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Looking good! I see you have platform lights. Are they working? If so - I am just about to install the wiring for four, very similar ones (12v) and wondered what wiring you used? I am struggling to work out the best method for both adequate supply but also to keep the joints waterproof. (will probably use a battery supply for now, but I have a mains supply nearby.)

 

Thanks

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Well Mike....   when the railway was track powered the lamps were illuminated.  I used LGB yellow bulbs and just ran wires to the track. This being DCC as long as the power was on, the lights worked.  They were running at about 20-24 volts. The same applied to any buildings that were illuminated.

 

Now that I’m battery powered there is no permanent power.  For some buildings, I’m using (with greater or lesser success!) using converted garden solar lamps.  I have a number of projects under way, so more info later. It’s all simple at the moment as LEDs and the calculations behind them are stretching my ability!

 

However, also we have a young Collie who likes chewing things, so many (most) of the details on the line need to be capable of being taken out and stored.  The same issue applies to our weather - tropical storms, the odd hurricane - so I need to be able to bring everything inside from time to time.  Virtually everything you see in the photo can be unplugged or taken up.

 

Those lamps have the ability to have wires run up inside and hold LEDs or small bulbs. So, everything is possible,

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10 hours ago, Martino said:

Well Mike....   when the railway was track powered the lamps were illuminated.  I used LGB yellow bulbs and just ran wires to the track. This being DCC as long as the power was on, the lights worked.  They were running at about 20-24 volts. The same applied to any buildings that were illuminated.

 

Now that I’m battery powered there is no permanent power.  For some buildings, I’m using (with greater or lesser success!) using converted garden solar lamps.  I have a number of projects under way, so more info later. It’s all simple at the moment as LEDs and the calculations behind them are stretching my ability!

 

However, also we have a young Collie who likes chewing things, so many (most) of the details on the line need to be capable of being taken out and stored.  The same issue applies to our weather - tropical storms, the odd hurricane - so I need to be able to bring everything inside from time to time.  Virtually everything you see in the photo can be unplugged or taken up.

 

Those lamps have the ability to have wires run up inside and hold LEDs or small bulbs. So, everything is possible,

 

Many thanks Martino - we too have a young dog who believes everything placed, anywhere, is a toy or chew for him, so I empathise!! He is calming down, but our cats seem to think the railway is their right of way, as do much of the local wildlife, so I still have to ensure everything will be as robust as I can make it.

 

This is an issue indoor modellers forget when wondering why some of our models are not pinpoint replicas!!

 

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Evening falls on the South Bucks Light Railway.   It’s beginning to get cool enough to start working on the railway again.  This weekend.....concrete the base for the new engine shed at Farnham Common!

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Fall work starts on the line this weekend, preparing the area for the new engine shed and coal stage. These are buildings under construction, and in a primed but not painted state. They’re from Thorley Miniatures (https://www.thorleyminiatures.com).  They are very detailed and have many extra pieces for added detailing.  More at https://www.facebook.com/TheSouthBuckinghamshireLightRailway

 

 

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During the ‘Great Isolation’ we’ve been moving forward with the engine shed and coaling stage at Farnham Common.  The coaling stage is just waiting for a spray of varnish before being put in place.  It could also do with some coal, but where do you get coal in Northwest Florida?
The engine shed is also nearly finished. The doors were being put on today.  The size of the hinges and associated screws were a bit of a challenge to my contact lenses and I managed to make a mess of a few, but I’m sure they’re salvageable.  All looking good to me however.

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The buildings are looking good! For coal, a method I have seen used is to break up polystyrene into the smallest bits possible, stick them together in clumps and then spray them black and grey. Used to lighten loads in wagons, but may work equally well for this? Alternatively, sharp grit, but this is much harder to paint.

 

Fortunately, I have some real coal, purloined on a visit to the UK some time back.

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On 28/04/2020 at 04:52, Mike Storey said:

The buildings are looking good! For coal, a method I have seen used is to break up polystyrene into the smallest bits possible, stick them together in clumps and then spray them black and grey. Used to lighten loads in wagons, but may work equally well for this? Alternatively, sharp grit, but this is much harder to paint.

 

Fortunately, I have some real coal, purloined on a visit to the UK some time back.

Thanks Mike, good ideas.  Actually I searched for coal on Amazon.  It appears that here in the US, people give coal as gifts to people who’ve been ‘naughty’. Who knew?  Anyway for $7 I got a small bag of real coal.  Just enough for the coaling stage (once thumped with a big ‘ammer of course!).  Put on the stage and soaked in diluted concrete bonding glue and Bob’s your proverbial as you’ll see in the photos I’m about to post.  Thanks again.

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