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Booking Hall

Far Wittering - inspiration from a 1984 Railway Modeller

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Fewer interruptions during the last two days meant more progress, and the main structure of the platform is now complete. The vertical faces have to be clad with some 300+ 'sleeper' sized balsa strips, which will be stained to look creosoted. I do it this (much more labour-intensive) way as the sleepers take on different colouring from the woodstain, and look much more natural than simply scribing the joints on a longer piece of balsa. After they're on, a horizontal rail will be fixed along the top edge, to support the sleeper platform edging, and the top can then be infilled with lightweight filler or card and the ash surface added. The design sketch should make it clear.

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Just found this - another follower, looks really good.

 

The Triang Hornby Cleresoties can scrub up nicely, these are mine.

 

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18 hours ago, mullie said:

Just found this - another follower, looks really good.

 

The Triang Hornby Cleresoties can scrub up nicely, these are mine.

Thanks Mullie, your clerestory's look good, mine are waaaayy to clean at the moment!

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Posted (edited)

The platform is nearly finished, with 301 stained vertical timbers on and 64 full size scale sleepers forming the edging. The infill is real soil from the garden, dried and sterilized in the oven, sifted and sprinkled onto PVA. A few gaps to make good when it dries.

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Edited by Booking Hall
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With the platform largely complete, until it is fixed in position and signs, lights etc added, attention has turned to the loading dock and cattle pen. This has been built in similar style to the platform, assuming it was built largely from old sleepers, although the cattle pen uses concrete posts from the Ratio range. Annoyingly, these are only drilled through in one direction, meaning that you have to drill them yourself on the adjacent face in order to use them as corner posts. The cobbled surface is a piece of wallpaper from B&Q.

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That's the loading dock and cattle pen largely finished. There are a few more details to add, such as fencing at the rear edge and steps down to track level, but I'll wait until a bit later to add them. I want to get the main structures ready to 'plant' so that ballasting can commence, but I'll need to build a coaling stage first . . .

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For the light railway look I'm aiming for, I fancied having a small corrugated iron building as the station, located at the station yard entrance rather than on the platform. This follows the original designers intentions also. One of my all-time favourite films is 'Oh, Mr Porter!', which was filmed at Cliddesden on the Basingstoke to Alton line, and I found that a card model design download for this actual building was available from http://www.amodelrailway.co.uk/shop/index.html for a very modest sum, so one was duly acquired. Having started it I'm not too happy with the way the corrugations are modelled, so I've decided to use the design as a template and clad it with scale corrugated sheets. The plastic offerings from the trade are too thick so I'm having a go at making my own by using a door threshold strip as a former, rubbing some foil from a takeaway container with a finely pointed stick. The corrugations are just 1mm apart, which is exactly to scale. I have to say though, crouched on the floor in a doorway is not the most comfortable way of modelling, so tomorrow I'm off to B&Q to buy a new strip I can fix to the bench!

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door threshold strip, brilliant - I haven't seen this method before.

The platform looks very impressive.

 

Andy

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Posted (edited)
17 hours ago, andyfoulger said:

door threshold strip, brilliant - I haven't seen this method before.

The platform looks very impressive.

Thanks Andy. Not my original idea I'm afraid though. I was tempted to follow Rev. Peter Denny's example on his EM layout 'Buckingham', and use the long toothed rollers from the focussing rack of old plate cameras as an embossing mill, and whilst I have a few such cameras, they are probably considerably rarer than in the 1950's when PD came up with this idea, so I ditched that.

 

First elevation of the building done, and I'm very pleased with the look of it. It's fiddly, but I wanted to re-create the prototypical use of overlapping sheets, so smaller pieces it had to be! There are 15 separate pieces on here.

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Edited by Booking Hall
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that looks very convincing, looking forward to seeing the finished item ...

 

Andy

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A few days of intermittent work has produced these three elevations. As it will be barely visible on the layout, on the rear elevation (the one without the doorway) I simply used full height strips of corrugated sheet and just butt jointed them. Seeing them together like this shows just how much more prototypical in appearance the front elevation is with correct overlaps, despite being much more time-consuming to do. One elevation took me two hours, the other took 10 minutes!!

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All station wall parts now clad and painted using GWR Light Stone as a sort of generic light-ish wall colour, and the windows made by the old-fashioned method of drawing the glazing bars onto acetate using a ruling pen loaded with thinned paint.

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Well, that's the station building almost finished, just the rainwater pipes, roof finials and perhaps a posterboard or two to add. Then a spot of weathering. I like it, it's got a lot of character for a simple building. For those who are interested in doing something similar, there are 101 separate pieces of corrugated tinfoil on it - that's two takeaway containers-worth - so a Chicken Madras and rice should sort it!

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I read somewhere that you can't make the toilet block from madras containers.... you have to order ....

a tindaloo!

 

 

 

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35 minutes ago, andyfoulger said:

I read somewhere that you can't make the toilet block from madras containers.... you have to order ....

a tindaloo!

 

 

 

***groan***:clapping:

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Coaling stage now made. Time to start assembling things on the layout . . . 

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