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Hi everyone,

I’ve returned to railway modelling after a gap of several years (I modelled previously in P4). I’ve started a layout in 2mm finescale based on the docks of Liverpool in the 70s. I’ve constructed a board from foam board to fit the requirements of the 2mm Scale Association (I’ve yet to join) DJLC. I’ve built a few warehouse buildings from adapted Scale Scenes kits. I’ll share photos of work so far. I’d like to start on track construction soon. I’m torn between using the Easitrac system or constructing from scratch using copper clad strip and nickel silver track. 
Any opinions or ideas?

I’ve got the taster 16T mineral wagon kit and intend to build the Association class 08 kit. 

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Hi Nick and welcome! 

 

I suppose the answer to your question depends on your previous experience and what you're proposing to build. If the track is going to be encased in hard surfacing (setts etc) then soldered track without chairs is cheaper and no harder if you have soldering experience. Easitrac is visually better than that, but more expensive if you are going to hide it all. You can have soldered track with chairs, but personally I can't see the point these days. 

 

You can mix and match, so solder track with chairs will align vertically with Easitrac and I've used that to have plain Easitrac and soldered pointwork in the past.

 

There will, of course, be a plethora of contradictory opinions coming soon! :rolleyes:

 

Tony

 

 

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I’m actually treading a similar route Nick, nothing grand, but kit buildings (mostly card) , some wagons and an 08 (chassis only + rtr body). Getting there slowly. Plumbed for easitrack, but then my sleepers will be visible.

 

I’m intrigued by your subject and look forward to more updates.

 

Cheers

John

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I'd suggest starting with a rewheeled 'N' loco and saving the full loco kit build until later. Then you will have something up and running quickly with which you can test your track and electrics.

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I concur with @D869  - having had so much trouble getting my first loco chassis running properly!  That said I would caution just to check the running qualities of the donor loco. I rewheeled a Farish 37 as my first 2FS loco and the bloody thing ran like a pig until I realised it had huge molded plastic protrusions under the axle slots which were fouling my trackwork.

 

@Yorkshire Square - I was exactly of your viewpoint (and I really enjoy full soldered construction) - but @justin1985 hybrid approach using plastic ties/chairs mixed with PCB slepeers and Laurie's etched chairplate system absolutely convinced me. It is of course a little way down the line for anyone who is just starting out in 2mm but I will be making all my track like that for the foreseeable!

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Going to be watching this thread with interest as a 2mmFS newbie. As my layout is (ok, will be) a colliery, I think there's enough track/ground mank to get away with almost invisible sleepers. From what I've been reading soldered PCB sleepers are more forgiving when it comes to pointwork, so I think I'm heading down that route.  For the less grimy runs, Easitrac gives the sleeper detail and the daylight below the rails, and I'll just have to deal with the height difference when I get to it.

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I never built one but it seems to me that the pegged easitrac turnouts (shop item 1-401 etc.) with milled crossing will be by far the most forgiving option.

I've built copperclad and 'normal' easitrac turnouts and the latter run very smooth.

Disclaimer: the easitrac were also my most recent turnouts so I had more experience...

Jan

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I've personally found PCB turnouts to be nicer but that's obviously just a personal preference - I would unhesitatingly use it for any trackwork where the ground level is up at the bottom of the rail for the sake of cost and the ability to bodge and repair fairly easily.

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Thank you for your kind replies. I’m pretty much set on copper clad sleepers and nickel silver rail, I really enjoy soldering. So next step 2mm Scale Association membership. 
Ive made a start on the 16T mineral taster kit and have followed the association video. I’m up to attaching the fold up axle boxes to the W irons. 3 on successfully, the final pinged off whilst holding in place with tweezers. No sign of the thing. Now going to add a raised edge to my work board. Big ask; has anyone got a spare axle box etch they could spare. No one would spot the missing box I think but it’s going to be niggling if you know it’s missing. The tiny size of parts is I guess part of 2mm scale modelling. 

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1 hour ago, 1965Nick said:

Big ask; has anyone got a spare axle box etch they could spare. No one would spot the missing box I think but it’s going to be niggling if you know it’s missing. The tiny size of parts is I guess part of 2mm scale modelling. 

 

Nick,

 

PM me your address and I'll pop some spare etched axleboxes in the post to you.

 

regards,

 

Andy

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