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Shalfleet Quay, Isle of Wight 1927-35.


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12 hours ago, LBSC123 said:

I have not seem that photo before.

They are not the type done by Mainline/Dapol/Bachmann, but it might be possible to swap a lettered barrel onto a cross wire type one to make it more accurate.

Judging by the number visible, it looks like they just shipped some tanks from the mainland and did not renumber them into a separate series.

 

Many thanks

All the best

Ray

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1 hour ago, wainwright1 said:

I have not seem that photo before.

They are not the type done by Mainline/Dapol/Bachmann, but it might be possible to swap a lettered barrel onto a cross wire type one to make it more accurate.

Judging by the number visible, it looks like they just shipped some tanks from the mainland and did not renumber them into a separate series.

 

Many thanks

All the best

Ray

 
Yep I would agree with that. I may pick up a mainline one just for variety whilst I work on improving the stock over a longer term, who knows, maybe Oxford rail will do one in their next batch... 

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Posted (edited)

I visited Eling yesterday and saw this lovely Wooden quayside wall for modelling inspiration. Although I think I’ve done a good job in capturing the overall look of this, it is clear that the top half of this is much more sun bleached than I have modelled. 
 

E1FB6526-5070-4159-92EC-4158BA4A5AC9.jpeg.013e283597228881c3d953142695841e.jpeg

 

 

So, I got out the white paint and dry brushed the top half of the quayside wall. I think it is has improved the look immensely, I need to touch up a few places but will do this alongside attaching the seaweed to the lower half of the quay. 

 

7FBF6020-E739-4AD3-B1A5-65ADDF33BCD0.jpeg.f2045b96796ca5c2f69f0e78150e4777.jpeg

 

74B03DB7-7C96-4658-A448-275852BDD283.jpeg.5bd9f660b40740fa71a3c0b2de920fcb.jpeg

 

694318C8-81C6-4E6C-8C02-51D4DDBBD34A.jpeg.6c30d17539ccc11c70e4c90005913fbe.jpeg

 

Edited by LBSC123
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Also not previously seen that photo, the only one I had was a single tank at the end of the same siding in the background of a photo taken from the platform.

This siding  served the power station, was the oil terminal here to?  (note: just a small static tank on blocks with a small shed for the pump and hose).  Later photos generally have the weedkilling tanks parked here.

 

Pete

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7 hours ago, LBSC123 said:

 
Yep I would agree with that. I may pick up a mainline one just for variety whilst I work on improving the stock over a longer term, who knows, maybe Oxford rail will do one in their next batch... 

Warning, the old Mainline chassis is not very good with the brake gear moulded on the outside of the wheels. If you can find an original Dapol one that is better. The Mainline (Black), Dapol (Black) and Bachmann (Red) tankers all had the same number. Can't really see what size the tank barrel is in the picture, it might be the smaller one, so if Oxford were to do a version using their new smaller barrelled tank with the cross wires it would be more accurate. 

1147123302_AngloAmericanTankers.jpg.1d76a8c11736c90d8d84c5c7064e2740.jpg

Some of the wagons from my Hawkhurst layout, including two of the Royal Daylight ones.

All the best

Ray

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16 hours ago, wainwright1 said:

Warning, the old Mainline chassis is not very good with the brake gear moulded on the outside of the wheels. If you can find an original Dapol one that is better. The Mainline (Black), Dapol (Black) and Bachmann (Red) tankers all had the same number. Can't really see what size the tank barrel is in the picture, it might be the smaller one, so if Oxford were to do a version using their new smaller barrelled tank with the cross wires it would be more accurate. 

1147123302_AngloAmericanTankers.jpg.1d76a8c11736c90d8d84c5c7064e2740.jpg

Some of the wagons from my Hawkhurst layout, including two of the Royal Daylight ones.

All the best

Ray

 

Thanks for the tip off, I must admit your wagons look rather nice, so I might be tempted to get one even if it's not technically correct...

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Spent a few more hours on the Layout yesterday. I made a start on knocking up the Will's garages into the Fishermans store that will go at the rear of the layout. I think this looks a lot better balanced now, but will mean that the backscene will be vitally important in creating an effective scene... 

 

IMG_8203.jpg.4f4f5f5900493a78903abcf22bbb1edb.jpg

 

 

IMG_8207.jpg.6929a78a7b2925e6aa54897f5bcf4221.jpg

 

 

Another possibility on this front is to purchase a sky backscene like this, and use a fencing and hedging to hide the fact that there's no ground at the bottom, I think from normal photograph angles there would be little backscene to be seen anyway from the quay, so this might work: https://www.howardscenicsupplies.co.uk/id-backscenes-id502b-blue-sky-15/


Another option is to get a photograph printed onto some 1mm foamboard like this, although I don't yet posses a suitable photograph, I'd need one with max 1inch ground and the rest sky, particularly at the right hand side of the layout, this seems like an appealing option, removing potential for bubbles under the backscene and it should give me a nice curve to fill the corner. 


More thought required, but for now I'll focus on the sea bed/tidal area. 

 
More soon!

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On 07/10/2020 at 16:59, IWCR said:

Sharps the timber merchant also had a small number of timber trucks in pre-grouping days.  At least 1 was an ex LBSCR long wheelbase double bolster, in very early days Ashey Chalk pit had some wagons and an "Incline Brake Van" the latter subject of a court case when the Central Railway "borrowed" it.

There were 2 or 3 off the Royal Daylight tank wagons, these carried Naptha (paraffin) which was used as a lighting oil.

Landed at St Helens Quay, known unloading points, Newport, Cowes, Ventnor West, Freshwater.

Wainwright 1, yell out when you visit, I shall be in the C&W workshop.

 

Pete

Hi Pete.

 

Many thanks for the behind the scenes look around the workshop and update on developments on the island railways on Sunday, we all enjoyed it. We were also amazed at the cost of producing the replacement blue glass panels for the Oldbury coaches. Your own layout was also of interest and we would like to see that when it is finished. I was pleased to see the 2mm finescale layout of Ventnor on display in Train Story, as I can remember seeing it almost complete and running at one of the Southampton exhibitions about twenty years ago. Pity that it does not appear to be operational now.

Hopefully, we will be back again next year to see what progress has been made on all these projects, but in the meantime keep up the good work.

 

All the best

Ray

 

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On 09/10/2020 at 12:33, LBSC123 said:

Spent a few more hours on the Layout yesterday. I made a start on knocking up the Will's garages into the Fishermans store that will go at the rear of the layout. I think this looks a lot better balanced now, but will mean that the backscene will be vitally important in creating an effective scene... 

 

IMG_8203.jpg.4f4f5f5900493a78903abcf22bbb1edb.jpg

 

 

IMG_8207.jpg.6929a78a7b2925e6aa54897f5bcf4221.jpg

 

 

Another possibility on this front is to purchase a sky backscene like this, and use a fencing and hedging to hide the fact that there's no ground at the bottom, I think from normal photograph angles there would be little backscene to be seen anyway from the quay, so this might work: https://www.howardscenicsupplies.co.uk/id-backscenes-id502b-blue-sky-15/


Another option is to get a photograph printed onto some 1mm foamboard like this, although I don't yet posses a suitable photograph, I'd need one with max 1inch ground and the rest sky, particularly at the right hand side of the layout, this seems like an appealing option, removing potential for bubbles under the backscene and it should give me a nice curve to fill the corner. 


More thought required, but for now I'll focus on the sea bed/tidal area. 

 
More soon!

I am not sure where you would get the back scenes printed onto Foam Board. If you are looking at using 1mm, that is going to be very weak. I would assume that you would mount them onto something. I have used MDF on my Hawkhurst layout and hand painted the back scenes, although I am not 100% happy with them yet and will do some refurbishment. Using MDF, you also need to seal it both sides with paint or varnish to stop it taking up moisture and distorting.

 

The layout is certainly coming on, but you may have a fun session cleaning up some of that track which looks fairly well coated with paint and filler in places.

 

All the best

Ray

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But, there are nice 6mm(?) ply boards there already, so the backscene need have no strength of its own if it is fixed to them. All MDF would do would be to add weight, surely?

 

Why not have a go at painting your own scene direct on the ply? You’ll almost certainly succeed,  but if it turns into a disaster you can wallpaper over it.

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4 hours ago, wainwright1 said:

I am not sure where you would get the back scenes printed onto Foam Board. If you are looking at using 1mm, that is going to be very weak. I would assume that you would mount them onto something. I have used MDF on my Hawkhurst layout and hand painted the back scenes, although I am not 100% happy with them yet and will do some refurbishment. Using MDF, you also need to seal it both sides with paint or varnish to stop it taking up moisture and distorting.

 

The layout is certainly coming on, but you may have a fun session cleaning up some of that track which looks fairly well coated with paint and filler in places.

 

All the best

Ray


Hi Ray, 

 

the backscene would be supported  by the ply and so wouldn’t need any strength of its own, however I think I’ve moved away from this idea for now anyway. 
 

I actually spent yesterday fitting DCC to a Hornby Terrier and testing out my newly acquired Gaugemaster Prodigy, you’ll be pleased to hear that after a little cleaning up of the track, and coaxing the DCC autofrogs into life, the layout operated without trouble. 
 

 

2 hours ago, Nearholmer said:

But, there are nice 6mm(?) ply boards there already, so the backscene need have no strength of its own if it is fixed to them. All MDF would do would be to add weight, surely?

 

Why not have a go at painting your own scene direct on the ply? You’ll almost certainly succeed,  but if it turns into a disaster you can wallpaper over it.

 

Hi @Nearholmer,

 

It feels like you’ve read my mind! As of today I’ve now put 3 coats of waterbased primer on the plywood backscene to fill the grain, this will be sanded back and painted with white emulsion paint, then the aforementioned method using  rattle cans and an airbrush. More updates to follow on this in due course!

 

Thanks for reading,

 

Will 

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I'm also loathed to digress onto another project, but since seeing the similarity between the this Bachmann Scenecraft building and an IoW station, I haven't been able to get this out of my head. 

 

image.png.616a5b52e70c973921115fb89c800372.png

 

image.png.f1df95abb722639309adc67b734bbc6e.png


Hmmmmm....

 

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Hi Will and Pete.

 

Thinking out loud about P.O. wagons on the Isle of Wight.

The chalk for the cement mill was taken from the quarry south of Newport in the Blue Circle open tipper wagons up to the mill beside the Medina on the Cowes line. Presumably the coal for the mill was delivered to the mill in railway company wagons. What happened to the finished product ? Was it used exclusively on the island or shipped to the mainland ? How was it shipped, in bags carried in ordinary vans or placed in open wagons and sheeted. They do not appear to have any dedicated vans and I would not have thought they would have used the ordinary ones due to risk of contamination. As cement is very sensitive to moisture, carrying it in open wagons would also be a bit risky.

 

With regard to the Royal Daylight lamp oil tankers, was this commodity for railway use only, or was it for public supply and were there storage tanks at Medina Wharf for this traffic, which would then be pumped into the tankers ?

 

Does anybody know ?

 

By the way, Cambrian Kits do a five plank end tipper open wagon based on a 1923 RCH design, which might not be 100% correct, but nearer to the prototype than the Wessex wagons. I am not sure if anyone does transfers for the Blue Circle roundel and matching blue numbers/letters ? Fox probably do the numbers/letters.

 

All the best

Ray

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Paraffin was a very common domestic heating, cooking and lighting fuel before mains gas and electricity, and even after that for heating - we had a coal fire in the sitting room, gas for cooking and hot water (coal range and back-boiler until my dad converted it all), and paraffin stoves “to knock the frost off” in the bedrooms until the I left home in 1978, and that was by no means abnormal.

 

I surmise that the tankers on the IoW might not have discharged to static tanks, but to delivery lorries, the rail tanks themselves serving as the bulk storage. 
 

Paraffin was delivered in cans or by a small tanker to houses in some places, and it used to be sold at garages, but also at general stores, which would have a tank filled from a lorry. Some even had a coin-in-the-slot pump so that you could fill a gallon can 24/7/365 ..... I know, because I schlepped a full can a couple of miles a few times when I was a boy. when we ran out at an awkward time and I got sent to the shop that had such a pump, which was all good for my best pal at the time, because his mum owned that shop.


The rail wagons may have been filled direct from a boat.

 

 

Edited by Nearholmer
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Coal for the Cement Mills was direct by sea.  Most of the Cement left by sea, local cement / concrete by road.

I believe the Paraffin came in at St Helens, dont know of any storage tanks probably unloaded direct to the rail tankers (not talking about large quantities here).

The facility at Cowes comprised a storage tank not much larger than the rail tanker.  This tank was part way up the bank in the Coal Yard area, a small wooden hut adjoined the siding contained a pump, Paraffin would have been pumped from the rail tanker to the storage tank (likely by hand).  Distribution by gravity back to the hut where small cans etc would be filled for local road / hand delivery.  Other locations would be similar.

Gone by mid SR days this traffic would have been readily taken over by road transport, the rise in motoring and increased use of oil / petrol resulted in a dedicated oil terminal at East Cowes which was not rail served.

Pete

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I have been looking further at the Royal Daylight traffic.

The Cowes terminal planning application is dated 1904.

The Anglo American Oil Company  is still listed in Kellys directory at Cowes station yard in 1928.

I could be wrong with the incoming point being St Helens quay, looking at the 1908 OS map there are several small oil tanks at Newport between the power station and the adjoining quayside building (currently the Bargemans Rest pub), this is at the end of the siding were the rail tankers were photographed. these could be a rail delivered terminal but more likely they took delivery by sea at the quayside and were the source of the rail traffic. This siding was gated and was originally for the power station coal deliveries, the height of the chimney on the boiler house was much reduced during its life, perhaps this had gone over to oil burning and the oil tanks were theirs for the power station with Naptha being handled as a side line.  The power station closed in 1928 which is around the time the Naptha traffic also ceased.

 

Pete

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On 15/10/2020 at 14:45, wainwright1 said:

Hi Will and Pete.

 

Thinking out loud about P.O. wagons on the Isle of Wight.

The chalk for the cement mill was taken from the quarry south of Newport in the Blue Circle open tipper wagons up to the mill beside the Medina on the Cowes line. Presumably the coal for the mill was delivered to the mill in railway company wagons. What happened to the finished product ? Was it used exclusively on the island or shipped to the mainland ? How was it shipped, in bags carried in ordinary vans or placed in open wagons and sheeted. They do not appear to have any dedicated vans and I would not have thought they would have used the ordinary ones due to risk of contamination. As cement is very sensitive to moisture, carrying it in open wagons would also be a bit risky.

 

With regard to the Royal Daylight lamp oil tankers, was this commodity for railway use only, or was it for public supply and were there storage tanks at Medina Wharf for this traffic, which would then be pumped into the tankers ?

 

Does anybody know ?

 

By the way, Cambrian Kits do a five plank end tipper open wagon based on a 1923 RCH design, which might not be 100% correct, but nearer to the prototype than the Wessex wagons. I am not sure if anyone does transfers for the Blue Circle roundel and matching blue numbers/letters ? Fox probably do the numbers/letters.

 

All the best

Ray


HI @wainwright1,

 

Best video I've found of the facilities of at the Cement Mill are in this video: http://www.eafa.org.uk/catalogue/3163 , with a lovely shot of W10 Cowes at a head of a train of wagons, although these are lettered 'Vectis', which I believe were grey and not yellow? Regarding the Cambrian kits, I was going to have a search for some suitable wagons once I've built the layout, and possibly paint them up in Vectics livery, although it's someway down the priorities list compared to bolstering my stock of Southern Railway wagons. 

Thanks to @IWCR  for the informative comments about the Royal Daylight tankers and what they were used for!
 

Edited by LBSC123
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That film is absolutely excellent. The wagons are lettered 'VECTIS', of course.

 

The short section showing the Motorail loco pulling skips of clay is as good as the standard gauge material, and that is first class.

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Hi Will.

 

That film was remarkable and amazing that it was on the cement works that we are interested in. It said that the cement works closed down in 1934 shortly after the film was made. Now the question is when was the wagon livery changed from the yellow Blue Circle livery (and why).  Did Blue Circle sell the works on ?

 

I have seen at least one photograph of the train of wagons in the Blue Circle livery in transit, although I do not know what date it was taken or which book it was in at the moment.

 

Upstairs Downstairs has produced wagons with the Vectis branding., although fairly basic printing and a bit spaced out by the look of it. I think that it is now sold out. Are there any good pictures of the wagons in this livery ?

 

More scope for models. I wonder what we will find next.

 

All the best

 

Ray

 

P.S. have you seen the new blog for a layout of Brading ?

 

 

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