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Posted 56 minutes ago

  1 hour ago, LNERJP said:

Hi, is there anyone currently commission building 2mm track?

 

JP

 

I believe Keith Armes is still building pointwork to commission. Details are on the 2mm website;

 

http://2mm.org.uk/small_suppliers/KeithArmes/index.html

 

Andy

Thank you Andy, I think his prices seem reasonable which does make it a tempting prospect.

 

JP

 

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Is there a source of 3D printed BR mark 1 coach roofs?

I really like the roofs that come with the 2mm Scale Association Br Mk1 kits.

I’ve got hold of a supply of Bill Bedford Mark 1 Coach sides which I’m going to start building up. 
Is 3D printing a worthwhile skill to learn? I’ve got no experience of it but have access to a 3D printer.

Another question, what do the Mark 1 underframe kits consist of? Are they similar to the ones in the Mark one kits?
 

Sorry for the volume of questions but I’m rather excited by it all. 

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49 minutes ago, 1965Nick said:

Is there a source of 3D printed BR mark 1 coach roofs?

I really like the roofs that come with the 2mm Scale Association Br Mk1 kits.

I’ve got hold of a supply of Bill Bedford Mark 1 Coach sides which I’m going to start building up. 
Is 3D printing a worthwhile skill to learn? I’ve got no experience of it but have access to a 3D printer.

Another question, what do the Mark 1 underframe kits consist of? Are they similar to the ones in the Mark one kits?
 

Sorry for the volume of questions but I’m rather excited by it all. 

Hi,

 

The Association sells plastic BR Mk1 roofs. I've used many of them with the Mk1 coaches I've built. I usually thin the ends down to get closer to a prototypical thickness.

 

Nigel Hunt

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14 hours ago, 1965Nick said:

[...]

 

Is 3D printing a worthwhile skill to learn? I’ve got no experience of it but have access to a 3D printer.

 

[..]

I would say it is. In my opinion, there is not much to learn about 3D printing - the 3D printer does the "heavy lifting". It is much more important to learn how to design a model - probably three quarters of creating a model is 3D design.

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39 minutes ago, 1965Nick said:

Hi, 

Ive seen a seller on EBay who’s selling underframe etches for BR Mk1stock in 2mm scale. Has anyone had experience of these? 
The seller is michaelw3286

 

I seem to recall some discussion of the etches that this chap had produced some years ago elsewhere on RMweb a few years ago, and the consensus was that they were etched on rather thin brass (approx 5 thou), and were not therefore particularly easy to build.

 

This is the thread I was thinking of;

 

I suspect it would be easier to stick with the nickel silver underframe etches in 2mm Shop 3.

 

I do have a 4mm scale Mk1 underframe etch from the same source (but bought secondhand) which is etched on thicker brass and although I haven't tried to assemble it, it looks fairly well designed.

 

Andy

 

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40 minutes ago, 1965Nick said:

Hi, 

Ive seen a seller on EBay who’s selling underframe etches for BR Mk1stock in 2mm scale. Has anyone had experience of these? 
The seller is michaelw3286

I think these have been around for a few years now. The etches are 5 thou brass and that seems a bit flimsy to me. I wouldn't fancy soldering the various bits to the floor pan as I think they would end up being distorted by the heat. I suspect the Association ones are a better bet, and cheaper, though I've never made any myself as I etched my own Mk1 underframes in 10 thou nickel silver.

 

Nigel Hunt

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52 minutes ago, Nig H said:

I think these have been around for a few years now. The etches are 5 thou brass and that seems a bit flimsy to me. I wouldn't fancy soldering the various bits to the floor pan as I think they would end up being distorted by the heat. I suspect the Association ones are a better bet, and cheaper, though I've never made any myself as I etched my own Mk1 underframes in 10 thou nickel silver.

 

Nigel Hunt

Add on import taxes etc and lack of pay-pal protection I think I would pass

 

Association ones build up very nicely

 

 

Nick B 

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It’s Association ones I think. The seller said they were etched on 5thou brass and were made from a design several years ago. Buying from Spain doesn’t seem worth it.  I’ve found the association mk1 kits a delight to build. 
Thank you Gentlemen for your sage words. I’ve got some Bill Bedford sides to use in 2mm including a RK. 

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7 hours ago, AndrueC said:

My question: Does this forum also cater for 'N gauge'? Just off-the-shelf N?

 

I'm going to say no, sorry, this sub-section of RMWeb isn't for "off the shelf N".    I agree with the comments earlier that people will try to help, but there are other places where the off-the shelf N products of Farish / Dapol /Peco, etc.. are discussed.   There are individual manufacture sections on RMWeb, there are topic areas on RMWeb, and there are forums on other sites including "The N Gauge Forum" which may be more applicable.   

 

(Its not my forum, just my opinion ). 

 

- Nigel

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I need to solder a bunch of lamp irons to the back of the bunker on the O2. The irons themselves are from the N Brass etch so that part is hopefully sorted, but does anyone have a good way to get them neatly lined up and generally under control while being soldered?

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2 hours ago, D869 said:

I need to solder a bunch of lamp irons to the back of the bunker on the O2. The irons themselves are from the N Brass etch so that part is hopefully sorted, but does anyone have a good way to get them neatly lined up and generally under control while being soldered?

A resistance soldering unit is one way if you can put a bit of solder paste on and hold the thing in place with the tip of the resistance soldering unit.  Power on what for the solder to just show power off ( mine is a foot button)  then hold steady until it has cooled. Another option is Stainless Steel forceps. Solder paste or just tin both the part and the are where it will fit clamp in place with the forceps apply heat from a flame and again what for the solder to just flow. Both of the above of course are much easier at 7mm. I must look out for some very small forceps  do they make any?  

 

Don

 

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14 minutes ago, Donw said:

 I must look out for some very small forceps  do they make any?  

These might be what you're looking for?  There are also reverse ones which, strangely, seem to be cheaper!

 

Jim

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1 minute ago, Caley Jim said:

These might be what you're looking for?  There are also reverse ones which, strangely, seem to be cheaper!

 

Jim

 

They look good Jim but would lack the lock ability  of the forceps.

 

Don

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Thanks both. I don't have an RSU - I think it will be a matter of using a big hot iron to get the heat where it's needed quickly and then get out again before it spreads far. Alignment and holding are the conundrums that are making me think. My own best guess is some strips of card with pencil marks along the top for alignment and to muddle through as best I can (same as always!) for holding. Will see how it goes and rethink if needed.

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2 hours ago, D869 said:

Thanks both. I don't have an RSU - I think it will be a matter of using a big hot iron to get the heat where it's needed quickly and then get out again before it spreads far. Alignment and holding are the conundrums that are making me think. My own best guess is some strips of card with pencil marks along the top for alignment and to muddle through as best I can (same as always!) for holding. Will see how it goes and rethink if needed.

If the lamp irons are on the footplate above the buffers, I put a small piece of paper between the bunker and the lamp iron and squeeze the lamp iron in place with the point of an Exacto knife blade. The sharp point limits the heat transfer ( I think), and I use a generous amount of solder on the tip of the soldering iron bit. You can always 'pull' some of the excess solder away from the lamp iron once its soldered in place to help clean away the excess solder. This method applies to 'L' shaped lamp irons. If soldering these sort flat on the bunker rear one way to mark the position is with a pencil 'cross' drawn on the surface of the bunker, or you could consider drilling a small hole and holding the lamp iron over the hole. For either way, then hold the lamp iron with an Exacto blade and solder as before. Another alternative is to tin the area of the bunker first, then sweat the lamp iron  on. Sometimes I've found such small parts will fly off as the flux boils, but eventually it should work. You can adjust the position of the lamp irons by nudging with the soldering iron, or holding and adjusting the lamp iron with ceramic tweezers as you melt the solder.

 

One of the difficult aspects of this is holding the loco itself so that the bunker is level. I'd try holding the loco in a vice with blocks of wood either side of the bunker, but obviously you'll need to take care not to crush the sides of the loco.

 

Nigel Hunt

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11 hours ago, Donw said:

They look good Jim but would lack the lock ability  of the forceps.

The 'reverse' ones (normally closed) might grip well enough to do the job.  I got a pair of the ordinary straight ones a year or so ago and use them constantly now, hardly ever using my college ones which I used for years (not only professionally!).

 

Jim

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8 hours ago, Nig H said:

If the lamp irons are on the footplate above the buffers...

 

Thanks Nigel. It's a Southern loco so it has more lamp irons than your more northern railways had... so probably all of those variations will apply. Boiling flux and solder paste mucking up the joint are problems I'm very familiar with. I was trying to reduce heat input by making a joint with Carrs 188 yesterday. After it looked solid but then came adrift four times I used normal solder on the fifth try... then it stayed put. For my money, applying more heat and doing it quickly usually ends up being the answer... even if it requires a bit of a deep breath beforehand. Pencil marks on the bunker... simple... now why didn't I think of that?

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Hi Folks, 

 

I have been thinking about getting one of the Grafar LMS Crabs with the aim of converting it to finescale. 

 

I have completed a modern tooling Grafar Jinty conversion with the conversion bearings, wheels etc provided by the association. 

My question is how do I go about converting one of the older models? I know I can get the wheel flanges turned down but I'm more looking at a proper conversion with correct scale wheels. 

Has anyone managed to do a Crab before?

Can I still use the valve gear and connecting rods from the N gauge model? 

 

Would it be a full chassis replacement? 

 

Many thanks in advance for any help you guys can give. 

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2 hours ago, Zaonite said:

Has anyone managed to do a Crab before?

Can I still use the valve gear and connecting rods from the N gauge model? 

 

There's a nice photo of Edwards Sissling's converted Farish Crab on the back cover of the December 2009 2mm Magazine. It has the original valve gear with finescale wheels - could they be Ballantine wheels?

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