Jump to content
I apologise for the additional advertising intrusion on tablets. I am trying to get the relevant parties to fix the situation. ×

Head above the parapet


Guest jonte
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest jonte

Jonte, I was guilty of answering after reading your OP without reading the other postings - so it was a bit redundant! There is a very nice finescale 2mm layout on RMWeb where the beautiful station building always looks to me as if it was just plonked down on the platform...............I like having the extra depth, besides you'll need it with buildings set on slopes in order to retain true horizontal/vertical.

 

You're a good modeler!

 

Best, Pete.

 

 

Please don't feel guilty, Pete; quite honestly, it was a relief to find that you hadn't picked up on something else :lol:

 

Anyway, I appreciate your taking time to write in.

 

I might have got away with it here, but you're quite right when you point out that on a slope I'd certainly be in trouble!!

 

Going back to your point about full length chimney stacks, I've read in the past that many modellers have opted for this method after several mishaps involving sweeping hands, so can recognise the benefit. In fact, just before deciding to build my doomed dark side model, I was working on a kit bashed Dapol signal box and had decided to replace the stove pipe provided with a full length copper tube of appropriate size.

 

Finally, thanks for the compliment. You're too kind.

 

Jonte

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jonte, very nice indeed and well observed.yes.gif

 

I think the most difficult bit 'to get right' is the roof, especially slates.

 

Sometimes the slates either don't sit right or come unstuck, and ride up just a little and show shadow underneath.

 

When you think how thin slates are, about the only thing you can use to replicate them accurately is razor blade.

 

Did you use paper or plastic (the worse offender!)?

 

The Peco (Manyways) and Wills are pretty good, unfortunately they only come in small sections and I haven't seen yet an invisible join.sad.gif

 

The best(?) imho I have seen recently, have been on the resin cast buildings! (Which of course defeats the point!!!).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest jonte

Jonte, very nice indeed and well observed.yes.gif

 

I think the most difficult bit 'to get right' is the roof, especially slates.

 

Sometimes the slates either don't sit right or come unstuck, and ride up just a little and show shadow underneath.

 

When you think how thin slates are, about the only thing you can use to replicate them accurately is razor blade.

 

Did you use paper or plastic (the worse offender!)?

 

The Peco (Manyways) and Wills are pretty good, unfortunately they only come in small sections and I haven't seen yet an invisible join.sad.gif

 

The best(?) imho I have seen recently, have been on the resin cast buildings! (Which of course defeats the point!!!).

 

Hi Black Rat.

 

Thanks for your input and kind compliment.

 

The tiles are just made of graph paper which is easy to cut, easy to keep lines pretty straight with its printed grids for reference and easy to glue with virtually any type of adhesive from Prittstick to UHU - I used Evo-stick PVA wood working glue simply because I had it. Most of all, it's thin so hopefully I've avoided the 'staircase' effect - although I've noticed that modern tiled roofs sport just this effect so there you go: a prototype for everything as they say!

 

I tried to replicate the odd slipped, broken or missing tile although I must say they're not obviously apparent - but at least I know they're there :lol:

 

The whole building has been painted and drybrushed with acrylics - from tubes that come in a box and which are available from most bargain basement type shops. They're okay, and I know they're quite popular these days, but I think I prefer well thinned enamels.

 

Thanks again Black Rat and best wishes,

 

Jonte

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold

Having bought one of the Scalescenes terraced cottage kits a few years ago, I find that the slates from that kit are very useful, being pre-coloured and you can just print off as many as you need once you've bought the initial kit.

 

I've also got some of the self-adhesive slates from York Modelmakers, they are also good.

 

I guess you could print the Scalescenes ones off on self-adhesive paper (use a good brand like 3M) and you don't even need glue either.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest jonte

Having bought one of the Scalescenes terraced cottage kits a few years ago, I find that the slates from that kit are very useful, being pre-coloured and you can just print off as many as you need once you've bought the initial kit.

 

I've also got some of the self-adhesive slates from York Modelmakers, they are also good.

 

I guess you could print the Scalescenes ones off on self-adhesive paper (use a good brand like 3M) and you don't even need glue either.

 

Sounds like a good idea, Captain Kernow, thanks.

 

Incidentally, talking of Scalescenes, what is the general concensus of opinion about using brick papers as opposed to the painted embossed equivalent? I ask because I'm seriously considering using it for brick structures in my latest venture, so your opinions are vital as to which option I choose.

 

Sorry to put anybody on the spot.

 

Jonte

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...