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Blue Peter

a1 partwork Flying Scotsman

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Can anyone help me please. Now that I've painted the chassis I was about to fit the pickups. I say was, because although nothing else has gone missing and I'm pretty careful, I cannot locate any pickups. Now I'm building two of these and while I can accept that I might mislay one set, I find it impossible to believe that I have lost two sets of pickups. Have they supplied any? The only reference I can find to said items is in part 104 which is complete with illustrations and gives instructions on how to fit them, but both copies (nor any others, I have them all) contain any parts.

 

Does anyone know the part number (one I have not come across) with the pickups in. If not whose pickups do I buy? I am only just about to send for the motors.

 

If I heard rightly, the pickups were included with the Hachette motor set, if you've not bought the set then you wont have them.

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I guessed that was the case, I want them to work, so I need better motors. Having looked through all of the issues I thought that I had the pickups, I must have only seen the photographs. Apart from the extra cost so far, that's two motors, two gearboxes, two sets of pickups, aset of transfers for 4476, set of nameplates, workpslates for the same it's a tidy sum. Good job my son is paying for the actual kits. While it's a lovely gauge to work with, I'm afraid that 0 gauge is way out of my league when it comes to cost which is why I've stuck to 00 all these years.

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I think the relative cost of different scales can be thought of either way. I reckoned N or Z were the more expensive scales I played with and LGB the cheapest per square foot. In a larger scale, you don't need the same quantity of locomotives and rolling stock. A compact layout can be made with a certain 'wow factor' using only a couple locos in 7mm. In a smaller scale, the same costs are typically spread over many more smaller vehicles.

 

I'd work out what sort of use you're going to give the loco before shelling out for a pair of motors. If planning on running on a 30' plus oval with 12 coach trains, buy as good as you can afford. If limited to a sub 10' shunting or there & back, something little more powerful than a OO motor should be fine.

 

Simon.

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It was my son's idea to buy the series, I wouldn't normally even look at it. I will run them in the garden so they will work to their capacity and I have modified several parts to suit.

 

My son bought the super glue idea, I told him it wouildn't be able to turn a wheel so he passed it onto me. Once I started he then bought another for me, so I've had my latest shot at my 00 layout held up for that time, I fnd that it has taken a fair bit of space to do these locos.

 

I have also thought about the number of locos and the relative costs, but I have over 50 years worth of 00 collection and the kids and my wife buy them for me for birthdays and Christmas, I'm nearly up to 100 locos now, luicrous, I know but irresistable. As I said 0 is in many ways a better scale to work on but I can at least run a decent (seven coach) train what would that cost in 0?

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I guessed that was the case, I want them to work, so I need better motors. Having looked through all of the issues I thought that I had the pickups, I must have only seen the photographs. Apart from the extra cost so far, that's two motors, two gearboxes, two sets of pickups, aset of transfers for 4476, set of nameplates, workpslates for the same it's a tidy sum. Good job my son is paying for the actual kits. While it's a lovely gauge to work with, I'm afraid that 0 gauge is way out of my league when it comes to cost which is why I've stuck to 00 all these years.

 

RedGauntlet

 

If you're looking for decent motors then I can recommend the motor/gearboxes produced by ABC Gears of Daventry (usual disclaimer) - you should be able to find them on the web.

 

Re pickups, I was mulling over making my own "plunger" type (like the Slaters product) but I got chatting to one of the partwork subscribers at the recent Telford show who had his build on show (and very, very nice it was too). He had plumped for a "live" chassis where the loco pickups up on one side and the tender on the other. To do this all one needs to do is:

 

1. Replace the drawbar between loco and tender (etched brass in the partwork) with an insulated item (copper-clad is ideal, gapped of course)

 

2. Arrange for the tender chassis to be electrically connected to one side of the motor - I did this by arranging for the bolt which attaches the new drawbar to the tender chassis to make electrical contact with the ternder-end of the gapped drawbar. A wire from that to the motor did the necessary. If this explanation is a little confusing then I can post a photo itf it helps.

 

3. Arrange for the wheels one one side of the loco to be shorted from rim to hub with the same on the other side of the tender wheels. For the wheels supplied, the rims are steel and Carrs Brown label flux (labelled for "Stanless Steel) plus a dab of multi-core solder will quickly attach wires from rim to hub. I used 0.7mm brass wire soldered straight across from rim to rim, also soldered at the two points it crossed the hub. Phosphor-brinze wire would have been better but I had none to hand. I then cut out the section of the wire which lay across the axle hole and filed the ends of the two wires thus left at both the hub and the middle. It is important to ensure the the hub ends of the wires do not stop the axle mating properly with the back of the wheel. Finally, I chamfered the backs of the wire at the rim end. It is essential to ensure that the wheels are thorough washed afterwards as otherwise the rims will start to rust quite quickly.

 

4. Arrange for the loco chassis to be electrically connected to the other side of the motor. There are plenty of screws on the chassis which make attaching the wire very easy. I did this rather than solder the wire to the chassis as the last thing I want is for that wire to break off ny nicely-painted chassis in the future

 

The only thing to watch is that one needs to be in and out with the soldering iron fairly quickly to avoid distorting the plastic wheel centres. Having said that, they are quite robust and normal care should ensure no problems - I used a .25W Antex.

 

Using a "live" chassis approach has a number of advantages:

 

Cost

A couple of lengths of wire, flux, solder and a small piece of copperclad as opposed to the cost of, say, a set of Slaters' Plunger Pickups

 

Strength

There is nothing to wear out!

 

Running

With any other system (plungers, wire rubbing against the wheel rims, etc), the loco is running with some "brakes applied". A "live" chassis is effectively "friction-free"

 

 

As noted above, I was put onto this by one of the subscribers at te Telford show and it seemed an ideal answer to the pickup issue.

 

Hope this helps

 

Stan Owen

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HI All

I haven't done much on my scotsman build, I'm using scale rivets but they are very fiddly, Can anyone suggest the best way of securing these to the cab sides ie cutting down etc

cheers All

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Thanks for the information Stan, I am comfortable with it having worked in mechanical engineering and electronics. I have made several 00 locos with both live and dead chassis and I think you're right about the braking effect of the plungers. I might well therefore, plump for the live chassis, I have checked all of the parts for insulation such as brake gear and so on and there are no shorts so it might be my preferred way forward.

 

I have to say that I have enjoyed making these but as my time is scarce, I'm finding them dragging on a bit now. I am pleased with the results so far. I shall try your recommendation for the motors, I haven't bought any in 0 gauge before, do you recommend any gear ratio, I intend using gearboxes.

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Thanks for the information Stan, I am comfortable with it having worked in mechanical engineering and electronics. I have made several 00 locos with both live and dead chassis and I think you're right about the braking effect of the plungers. I might well therefore, plump for the live chassis, I have checked all of the parts for insulation such as brake gear and so on and there are no shorts so it might be my preferred way forward.

 

I have to say that I have enjoyed making these but as my time is scarce, I'm finding them dragging on a bit now. I am pleased with the results so far. I shall try your recommendation for the motors, I haven't bought any in 0 gauge before, do you recommend any gear ratio, I intend using gearboxes.

 

 

RedGauntlet

 

Glad to help. My motor/gearbox combo is described as a VML1 Gearbox (with extra pillar), fitted with a Mashima 1824 motor. I originally bought it for a 7mm GWR King (Malcolm Mitchell/Just Like the Real Thing) which I am also in the process of building but it fits fine in "Scottie" with a very little easing of the cutout in the bottom of the boiler. The ratio of the gearbox is 48:1 which produces good slow running and a top speed which does not remind one of Scalextric! The motor is a two-stage reduction with an intermediate shaft and gear and the great thing is that the motor-mounted worm and the intermediate gear are helically-cut. This means that, unlike straight-cut gears, one can turn the wheels and the motor shaft rotates - great for checking out any tight spots. The final drive gear is tightened to the axle with a machine screw whose hex head just happens to fit the same hex key as the wheels!

 

ABC Gears do a comprehensive range of 11 or so gearboxes and a selection of 9 motors including coreless designs similar to the old Portescap RG7. Prices are not the lowest but, given the quality, perfectly reasonable. I actually ordered my combo at a Gauge O show and it was sent to me by post. Take a look at http://www.abcgear.talktalk.net/ and they will be sure to have something suitable for your needs.

 

To run the loco I use a Gaugemaster Series U panel-mounted controller (separate throttle and brake controls) which is designed for 7mm models and is rated at 2amps (rather higher than the rating for controllers in 4mm scale).

 

Hope this helps

 

Stan Owen

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HI All

I haven't done much on my scotsman build, I'm using scale rivets but they are very fiddly, Can anyone suggest the best way of securing these to the cab sides ie cutting down etc

cheers All

 

Bianco55

 

I too used scale rivets both on the on the top of the boiler and the cabsides. I used a smear of solder paint (powdered solder in a liquid suspension) painted on each rivet which was then inserted through the hole. A dab more solder paint smeared round the rivet head and on the inside of the cabside round the river shank, a touch with a reasonably-powerful soldering iron and the rivet is (probably) secured. I cut the excess from the rivet shank using fine-nose cutters as close to the inside of the cabside as I could and finished off with a flat needle file (a "riffler" file - one with a curved end - might be better) and some wet-and-dry. If you follow this approach you may find that filing the "pip" off causes the odd rivet to come loose. To stop these falling out during the filing process, I held a fingertip over each rivet head in turn during the trimming and filing process - you can then feel if it comes loose and resolder the rivet in position before it drops out and becomes lost on the floor! I'm not at all convinced that gluing these rivets to the cabside will achieve the same mechanical strength and, provided you can solder, this is by far the preferred option.

 

Best of luck

 

Stan Owen

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Bianco55

 

I too used scale rivets both on the on the top of the boiler and the cabsides. I used a smear of solder paint (powdered solder in a liquid suspension) painted on each rivet which was then inserted through the hole. A dab more solder paint smeared round the rivet head and on the inside of the cabside round the river shank, a touch with a reasonably-powerful soldering iron and the rivet is (probably) secured. I cut the excess from the rivet shank using fine-nose cutters as close to the inside of the cabside as I could and finished off with a flat needle file (a "riffler" file - one with a curved end - might be better) and some wet-and-dry. If you follow this approach you may find that filing the "pip" off causes the odd rivet to come loose. To stop these falling out during the filing process, I held a fingertip over each rivet head in turn during the trimming and filing process - you can then feel if it comes loose and resolder the rivet in position before it drops out and becomes lost on the floor! I'm not at all convinced that gluing these rivets to the cabside will achieve the same mechanical strength and, provided you can solder, this is by far the preferred option.

 

Best of luck

 

Stan Owen

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Thanks for the advice Stan, Its the ones in the top front corner that could cause probs. There is already solder on the inside of cab from fixing window frames I will cut rivets as short as poss and hold in place with bluetak and run solder over the pips. I have waited until I have all the parts before carrying on with the build. I have followed the forum from the start and think that you have put some serious input into this model, Well done. Having built a couple of OO gauge locos I think this model is of a decent quality. Cheers

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Hi all- Well this seems the end of the "build" for me,2years and 9 months down the line,all is finished,

I still can't decide wether or not to put the coal in the tender,

For those of you still building it is quite a substantual model.

Pity about the crap controller they sent,still it can be upgraded,

good luck to all those still building.

 

ROB

post-1950-064550300 1284879372_thumb.jpg

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Bianco55,

As regard to the sequence of build,I just took it week by week, leaving the transfers till last.

I have screwed it together thus:- boiler to footplate/footplate to frame/and cab last,

I've done it thisway if there is any "frame trouble"(motor etc,) then it can be stripped down to fix.

Appreciate you like the Photo.-----ROB

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I was thinking the same thing has everyone packed it in, seems a shame as I'm sure there are Scotsmans still being built mine included

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Well after waiting about 4 months for a replacement part which was badly cast, and being totally lied too by W H Smith

about how long a replacement part would be , At least Hatchette come up trumps with the part.

Perhaps you would like to come to Sasanach land Rob to finish it off........

 

Regards Ted..

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Hi Ted, That would be about right,asyouknow,I too had to wait foreverand that was just waitng for the mag's. what part were you waitng for?----ROB

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Hi Rob

 

I was trying to get a replacement atomiser part 102/103 as you know it has 7 holes to drill out but the part I received only had

5 good holes I could drill out, so I stopped the build, will have to plough through the books to find out what goes where.

 

regards Ted..

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Hi all final twist in the hachette saga i recieved my final mags last month, waited for the direct debit to be taken then cancelled it then last week got a letter from them asking for payment as my dd had been cancelled , after a stern phone call they agreed they was at fault . As for my build its going really slow, to many projects on the work bench, keep the pics coming if only to spur me on, will try to post some pics myself in the next few weeks.

Dave

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If anyone living in north Birmingham would like to see my efforts so far, building the Hatchette A3 - then come along to Birmingham MRC's exhibition 23rd October at St Cuthberts Church, Castle Vale. Details on our club website. Alternatively the website shows details of where our club meets on Tuesday evenings - all welcome.

 

Regards, Paul Boot.

 

http://birminghammodelrailwayclub.clubbz.com

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Hi all final twist in the hachette saga i recieved my final mags last month, waited for the direct debit to be taken then cancelled it then last week got a letter from them asking for payment as my dd had been cancelled , after a stern phone call they agreed they was at fault . As for my build its going really slow, to many projects on the work bench, keep the pics coming if only to spur me on, will try to post some pics myself in the next few weeks.

Dave

Hi

I had exactly the same situation, but I just ignored them, and I have not heard anymore......... they really are clowns. Poor products, poor customer service and even poorer after sales, I for one will NEVER use their products again !!!!!!

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