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18 hours ago, Bryn said:

What started out as a quick weathering job turned out to be a complete underframe rebuild job. Inspired by the Jim Smith-Wright modification carried out in 4mm scale.

 

- Chassis block machined to remove all metal below solebar level 

- Plastic solebar under the cabs cut back and replaced with plasticard sections tapering in towards the centre line of the locomotive

- New fuel tanks and battery boxes scratch built

- Original water tank reworked into a three dimensional shape

- I beam cross supports added to attach the underframe parts to the body 

- Buffer beam detail with missing plough blade

- Modelu driver 

- Weathering with oils, acrylics and powders

 

I'll add a full write up on my blog eventually.

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20210307_161931.jpg

That's brilliant, Bryn. You may just have given me the push to try the same thing. I have JS-W's article about his 4mm conversions and they certainly change the look of the locomotive.

Interested in your choice of 25043 which was a bit of a celebrity before it got a makeover at Derby works. Here it is at Carlisle in March 1976:

762907943_25043CarlisleCitadelMar1976.JPG.c2b9558d9626a59cdb5e291903dbceed.JPG

The last green Class 25. Two months later Derby got their hands on it!

 

David

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2 hours ago, DavidLong said:

Interested in your choice of 25043 which was a bit of a celebrity before it got a makeover at Derby works.

 

Thank you David,

 

I've always wanted to model 043 with the missing plough after seeing it on Dave Plimmer's excellent 2D53 website.

 

https://www.2d53.co.uk/colwynbay/Goods.htm

 

It seemed a very appropriate choice of locomotive for the layout. I've now got to consider how to make a class 25/3 as I can't see Farish doing it anytime soon, or not until I finish mine.

 

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22 minutes ago, Bryn said:

 

a class 25/3 as I can't see Farish doing it anytime soon

 

 

I know, tedious, isn't it? I think they've lost interest in N. They are onto 24/1s in 4mm. Grrr. . .

 

David

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The cattle van has come on a way. The chassis (2-363) was made up as intended with DCIII type vacuum brakes. The stops for the door needed to be separated and refitted to align with the detail on the body. 
 

C17F120F-E8F5-4504-B235-2BFCC6A1587D.jpeg.2783ed0c92dcac9491857cbb233ad149.jpeg

 

With the body the corners took some fettling for a decent join and then the floor was the wrong size. I made a support at roof level where the sides were wanting to bow inwards and have cut a partition from some 0.015” styrene fixed in the medium position. The head stocks were drilled out and some self contained buffers added. It’s destined to be representative of diagram W8. These had slots in the ends when built but I stopped short of adding them because I didn’t fancy trying to create 9 uniform slots in each end. It ought to have some lamp irons too but probably nobody would have noticed until I just mentioned it. 
 

A roof, side rail, couplings and wheels should, I think, complete construction. 
 

 

Edited by richbrummitt
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This may not seem much, but it's a breakthrough for me. I've finally got an Easitrac turnout that doesn't throw a wagon off the rails!  

 

This one's for the Forth & Clyde AG layout, if it passes muster, and if it doesn't I'm happy to reclaim it and incorporate it into my own.

 

 

20210310_215700.jpg

 

Edit: nearly a day later and I've just noticed I forgot the check rails.  Oops. :blush:

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On 07/03/2021 at 18:07, Bryn said:

I'll add a full write up on my blog eventually.

 

As promised, my class 25 underframe article has been uploaded to the blog.

 

 

Edited by Bryn
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20210313_192343.jpg.e21054908e959cb3ce1ec559debe4c95.jpg

 

This weeks experiment was using AK Interactive's chipping fluid to give a flaking paint look. 

 

20210312_125525.jpg.f4f69abe1aa5711f8aa4732ba6d986ad.jpg

 

Kit is a Chivers Tube wagon and final weathering is oil paint fades and powders.

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Looks like a great effect Bryn, how does the chipping fluid work? 
 

Tom. 

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This morning everything except the coupling was sorted for the cattle wagon. Fitting the wires might have been easier before the sides were fitted to the ends. The plastic parts are a twin pack so I’ll try it the other way and report back. I need to order a second chassis etch but I’ve made two of each additional part (roofs &c.) as I’ve gone along so the next one should be quicker
 

002B4BC1-9BF8-4689-B60C-43794F66216E.jpeg.17df56056b7061428d61f680ca432c83.jpeg
 

The roof is just loose because the inside is a pain to get the paint to without access.
 

37379722-A541-483B-A01C-56A09A6D8C34.jpeg.f5903aeb4a8d4c3c07e822159d1328da.jpeg

 

the couplings will be added after too. 
 

Wheels have been test fitted and removed ready to paint.

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2021-03-16_11-37-45

 

Ready for painting, an etched LNWR van. Still getting to grips with the small parts of this scale. All good fun and enjoyable in the end, but there were a few moments of sheer frustration. I know what to do better on the next one....

 

Will

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Hi all,

 

First time sharing something I’m working on. 
 

With help from (and thanks to) Rich Brummitt I’ve been trying to get my head around drawing up some artwork for etching. I was apprehensive about sending things off for etching and then being wrong when they come back so I obtained some .35mm thick card from work and printed it as a mock up. The body is a 3d printed L&Y class 28. 

This stage of progress was a week or two ago. I need to find some other things to add to the artwork to make it worthwhile in having an A4 or even an A3 sized etch made up. I am thinking of maybe some coaches or wagons; all L&Y oriented I think. 

 

209BAB6B-7481-457D-8917-64BD53003DFE.jpeg

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14 minutes ago, A. Bastow said:

Hi all,

 

First time sharing something I’m working on. 
 

With help from (and thanks to) Rich Brummitt I’ve been trying to get my head around drawing up some artwork for etching. I was apprehensive about sending things off for etching and then being wrong when they come back so I obtained some .35mm thick card from work and printed it as a mock up. The body is a 3d printed L&Y class 28. 

 

 

 

The card idea is a good one - and congratulations on making the jump!  I haven't managed to do it yet but am keen.  Been side tracked drawing 2mm scale Victorian Railways Spirit of Progress carriages!   The SoP was the Australian version of the Coronation and Silver Jubilee although I don't think the S class pacific could have matched the speed.

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21 minutes ago, A. Bastow said:

Hi all,

 

First time sharing something I’m working on. 
 

With help from (and thanks to) Rich Brummitt I’ve been trying to get my head around drawing up some artwork for etching. I was apprehensive about sending things off for etching and then being wrong when they come back so I obtained some .35mm thick card from work and printed it as a mock up. The body is a 3d printed L&Y class 28. 

This stage of progress was a week or two ago. I need to find some other things to add to the artwork to make it worthwhile in having an A4 or even an A3 sized etch made up. I am thinking of maybe some coaches or wagons; all L&Y oriented I think. 

 

209BAB6B-7481-457D-8917-64BD53003DFE.jpeg

I'm waiting nervously for my first-time wagon etch to come back from the etchers. I've hedged my bets by only including three wagons and peppering the rest of the minimum-size sheet with all sorts of others stuff (fencing, windows, pithead sheaves, even anchors for my partner who does a lot of maritime crafting!). I am working on the assumption that the etches are littered with errors in spite of the great advice from other forum members. If I can end up with three static models lurking at the back and artwork for a new, viable etch, then I'll count it as a win.

 

Good luck with yours.

 

Richard

Edited by Geordie Exile
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1 hour ago, A. Bastow said:

This stage of progress was a week or two ago. I need to find some other things to add to the artwork to make it worthwhile in having an A4 or even an A3 sized etch made up. I am thinking of maybe some coaches or wagons; all L&Y oriented I think. 

If you use PPD there's no need to fill an A4 sheet as their standard width for n/s is 300mm and will do any length from 150mm (IIRC) to 1500mm.  Their turnround is reasonably quick and they are a very helpful company to deal with in my experience.  Usual disclaimer.

 

If your first etch turns out to be perfect, then you're a better man than me! 

 

Jim

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19 hours ago, A. Bastow said:

Hi all,

 

First time sharing something I’m working on. 
 

With help from (and thanks to) Rich Brummitt I’ve been trying to get my head around drawing up some artwork for etching. I was apprehensive about sending things off for etching and then being wrong when they come back so I obtained some .35mm thick card from work and printed it as a mock up. The body is a 3d printed L&Y class 28. 

This stage of progress was a week or two ago. I need to find some other things to add to the artwork to make it worthwhile in having an A4 or even an A3 sized etch made up. I am thinking of maybe some coaches or wagons; all L&Y oriented I think. 

 

 

Hello Adam,

 

This is very interesting, especially the Class 28. One of my reservations about 3D printing is the minimum thicknesses required. I wonder whether it would be possible to mix 3D and etched parts for the Class 28, specifically the cab side sheets, the dummy front frames and the steps. Maybe other parts could be considered including tender side sheets and rear. My idea for the cab side sheets is that etched versions could be used as an overlay though it would mean the cab cutout beading would also need to be etched then soldered in place- not always the easiest of tasks. My approach with beading is to draw it overwide then file it down to correct width one securely soldered to the side sheet.

 

Concerning other bits to be etched, some L & Y suburban coaches would be nice, especially a BT D.94 and the 10 wheeler RBTO. Matching bogies would be good too.

 

Nigel Hunt

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Thanks for the encouragement folks. 

 

For my first etch, I kind of wanted to group together all of the bits that I might want in the future as a test for the artwork, then if I wanted more in the future I can always separate the components out and have an exclusive etch made. 

 

@Sithlord75 I was worried about wasting money, hence the idea for a paper mockup - I can see how it goes together and make adjustments based on how well it went. That mock-up made me realise that I needed to change the hole diameter for the wheels and geartrain. I had drawn them twice as big, using the circle from radius as opposed to by diameter. 

 

@Caley Jim I did intend to use PPD for my first etch, minimum size as I read it is 300mm x 150mm, but I'm sure I have enough for an A4 at least I just need to sit down and do the drawings. So many other things to work on at the same time. Like getting the turnouts working that I have made. 
 

@Geordie Exile Including ephemera such as fences, windows and the like wasn't something I had thought of. Consider the idea stolen! 

@Nig H You don't happen to have any good drawings or diagrams of the D94 and D87 do you? I have the Jenkinson book with them in but the diagrams don't include height on the drawing, plenty of lengths to measure from but that introduces inaccuracies. I'd rather work it out with basic maths from the dimensions given rather than having to measure it with calipers. 

 

I guess I'll have to get on to my computer tonight and share the progress on this as it develops. 

 

Adam

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12 minutes ago, A. Bastow said:

Thanks for the encouragement folks. 

 

For my first etch, I kind of wanted to group together all of the bits that I might want in the future as a test for the artwork, then if I wanted more in the future I can always separate the components out and have an exclusive etch made. 



@Nig H You don't happen to have any good drawings or diagrams of the D94 and D87 do you? I have the Jenkinson book with them in but the diagrams don't include height on the drawing, plenty of lengths to measure from but that introduces inaccuracies. I'd rather work it out with basic maths from the dimensions given rather than having to measure it with calipers. 

 

I guess I'll have to get on to my computer tonight and share the progress on this as it develops. 

 

Adam

Hi Adam,

 

I have the Jenkinson book, and the R W Rush one only. The L & Y Society has some coach drawings listed including D. 94 with a note 'from Rush'. If so it won't be dimensioned, I think. The L & Y drawings can be viewed and photographed at Manchester Central Library when it re-opens. Sam Kennion is a L & Y soc member so I'll ask him if he can help with more information.

 

I think the Jenkinson drawing should do for a coach side as long as you make measured bits fit in with known dimensions. When I drew the artwork for my GSWR dining car I used a spreadsheet to help balance the gaps between the vertical lines of the paneling and associated beading. This helped ensure the sum of the total equalled the known length of the coach. I use a spreadsheet to convert feet and inches to millimetres also. This can be used as an audit trail of all the dimensions in a drawing, including source of dimension and whether quoted in the published drawing or measured from it.

 

Nigel Hunt

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14 minutes ago, Nig H said:

Hi Adam,

 

I have the Jenkinson book, and the R W Rush one only. The L & Y Society has some coach drawings listed including D. 94 with a note 'from Rush'. If so it won't be dimensioned, I think. The L & Y drawings can be viewed and photographed at Manchester Central Library when it re-opens. Sam Kennion is a L & Y soc member so I'll ask him if he can help with more information.

 

I think the Jenkinson drawing should do for a coach side as long as you make measured bits fit in with known dimensions. When I drew the artwork for my GSWR dining car I used a spreadsheet to help balance the gaps between the vertical lines of the paneling and associated beading. This helped ensure the sum of the total equalled the known length of the coach. I use a spreadsheet to convert feet and inches to millimetres also. This can be used as an audit trail of all the dimensions in a drawing, including source of dimension and whether quoted in the published drawing or measured from it.

 

Nigel Hunt

 

Hi Nigel,

 

I'm a member of the LYRS myself, though last time I asked for drawings etc, the B. C. Lane Drawings came back, which are the ones in the Jenkinson book. I'll have to have a trip out to Manchester when things start opening up again. I do have it on good authority though that the LYRS is working on a book of carriages and their drawings. 

 

I did do some bogie designs for 3d printing as an exercise in whether it could be done, but my pal who does the 3d printing hasn't got round to it yet - this was to see if functional parts were possible. 

 

I work in a similar way, converting the dimensions on a spreadsheet. Although the last one I worked from I marked up the drawing in red with the 2mm scale dimensions - this was for 3d printing.

 

I think 3d printing has its merits for enclosed structures, but as you say for cab side and roof, etched parts will give the correct scale thickness needed. Likely in the future I will have a go at doing a proper etch for the class 28. My list of things to have a go at gets longer and longer. 

I should stop being a hobby butterfly with many unfinished tasks and I should concentrate on getting my trackwork finished and wired up. Like I've seen in Geordie Exile's tagline It's not "a bunch of unfinished projects", it's "slow-burn multi-tasking".

 

Adam

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I have spent the last several months trying to build up some rolling stock that was actually used on the Isle of Wight to replace the general collection of wagons and carriages that I have been running on my Freshwater layout to date. This has so far amassed 19 vehicles that required couplings to be fitted.

 

Fitting DG couplings is not one of my favourite jobs, and I usually rush it and then have to spend lots of time later twiddling, bending, cutting and eventually replacing them. Problems normally found are loops that do not fall down from vertical, loops that catch under the fall plate and do not uncouple, iron dropper wires too long catching rails on points and fall plates that do not move enough.

 

This time I thought I would spend some time and take care in fitting and testing. I only fit a loop at one end, and the 'fall plate' at the other as I am happy with not turning wagons around, and I can buffer up to the end loading bay without damaging a loop.

 

The main body of the DG coupling is cut from the fret, and the cut tabs are gently filed to make sure there are no jagged edges to catch on anything. I then run some solder into folds to strengthen them. If I attach the coupling to the chassis before painting then I just prime and paint the coupling along with the chassis. If the chassis is already painted, then I drop the coupling into some Casey Brass Black for a few seconds to chemically blacken it. The coupling body is soldered or glued in place so that the slot for the fall plate is just beyond the edge of the buffer beam.

 

I set up a 'sort of' production line, fitting all the loops first (although not in one sitting) and then all the 'fall plates'. I have a short test track with a rare earth magnet set underneath. I have an existing wagon that I use to test all the new vehicles against.

 

I wind the phosphor bronze wire round the DG former to produce bends at the correct distances, but I make a slight change. I add a tail to the loop central to the loop and angled down.

 

IMG_20210323_224804

 

The one on the left shows the bent phosphor bronze wire while the one on the right has the iron wire soldered to it. The loop needs to have nice right-angled corners and should lie flat. Rework as required, or reject.

 

It is a bit of a Chinese puzzle fitting these shaped loops, but you get used to it eventually.

 

The wagon is then tested on the test track against the test wagon. The height is adjusted so the the loop couples nicely to the hook on the test wagon, and then coupling and uncoupling is tested over the magnet 4 ot 5 times. If it works every time, move on to the next one until all the vehicles have been fitted with loops.

 

The 'fall plates' are then chemically blackened and cut from the etch. Again the etch tabs are gently filed to ensure there are no jagged edges for the loops to catch on, and then they are gently curved around the hadle of a jeweller's file. Then, the part I hate is fitting the fall plate and prising apart the 'tangs' with a knife blade. I always wear glasses, but one day I expect a blade to shatter and cause mayhem.

 

The photo below shows the curved 'fall plate' ready to be fitted, and the location of the magnet below the test track. The Midland wagon is my test wagon, and was not a visitor to the island.

 

IMG_20210324_141926

 

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1 hour ago, Ian Morgan said:

I have spent the last several months trying to build up some rolling stock that was actually used on the Isle of Wight to replace the general collection of wagons and carriages that I have been running on my Freshwater layout to date. This has so far amassed 19 vehicles that required couplings to be fitted.

 

Fitting DG couplings is not one of my favourite jobs, and I usually rush it and then have to spend lots of time later twiddling, bending, cutting and eventually replacing them. Problems normally found are loops that do not fall down from vertical, loops that catch under the fall plate and do not uncouple, iron dropper wires too long catching rails on points and fall plates that do not move enough.

 

This time I thought I would spend some time and take care in fitting and testing. I only fit a loop at one end, and the 'fall plate' at the other as I am happy with not turning wagons around, and I can buffer up to the end loading bay without damaging a loop.

 

The main body of the DG coupling is cut from the fret, and the cut tabs are gently filed to make sure there are no jagged edges to catch on anything. I then run some solder into folds to strengthen them. If I attach the coupling to the chassis before painting then I just prime and paint the coupling along with the chassis. If the chassis is already painted, then I drop the coupling into some Casey Brass Black for a few seconds to chemically blacken it. The coupling body is soldered or glued in place so that the slot for the fall plate is just beyond the edge of the buffer beam.

 

I set up a 'sort of' production line, fitting all the loops first (although not in one sitting) and then all the 'fall plates'. I have a short test track with a rare earth magnet set underneath. I have an existing wagon that I use to test all the new vehicles against.

 

I wind the phosphor bronze wire round the DG former to produce bends at the correct distances, but I make a slight change. I add a tail to the loop central to the loop and angled down.

 

IMG_20210323_224804

 

The one on the left shows the bent phosphor bronze wire while the one on the right has the iron wire soldered to it. The loop needs to have nice right-angled corners and should lie flat. Rework as required, or reject.

 

It is a bit of a Chinese puzzle fitting these shaped loops, but you get used to it eventually.

 

The wagon is then tested on the test track against the test wagon. The height is adjusted so the the loop couples nicely to the hook on the test wagon, and then coupling and uncoupling is tested over the magnet 4 ot 5 times. If it works every time, move on to the next one until all the vehicles have been fitted with loops.

 

The 'fall plates' are then chemically blackened and cut from the etch. Again the etch tabs are gently filed to ensure there are no jagged edges for the loops to catch on, and then they are gently curved around the hadle of a jeweller's file. Then, the part I hate is fitting the fall plate and prising apart the 'tangs' with a knife blade. I always wear glasses, but one day I expect a blade to shatter and cause mayhem.

 

The photo below shows the curved 'fall plate' ready to be fitted, and the location of the magnet below the test track. The Midland wagon is my test wagon, and was not a visitor to the island.

 

IMG_20210324_141926

 

I  use a Stanley Knife blade as far more robust than a  scalpel,  it took patients at a area meet ( remember those ? )  where  Martin taught  the trick of forming the loops

 

Nick B

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