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nick_bastable

Whats on your 2mm Work bench

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Really nice model of a chopper.   One suggestion - the thinnest line of black thread (silk?) from bottom of chainring to rear of bike to represent the lower chain run.  The upper chain run is nicely hidden in all the framework. 

 

- Nigel

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Really nice model of a chopper.   One suggestion - the thinnest line of black thread (silk?) from bottom of chainring to rear of bike to represent the lower chain run.  The upper chain run is nicely hidden in all the framework. 

 

 

Like this?

 

post-6986-0-67859700-1438539910_thumb.jpg

 

I've used a hair from a paint brush. It's only 1.5mm long. The paint finish looks perfectly smooth in real life unlike the cruelly enlarged photo.

 

Gareth

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Brilliant Gareth !    Yes, I think the line from the paintbrush hair makes the difference.  Doesn't matter if it sags a little, as the bottom run of a chain would be slack.

 

Now put it in the AGM model competition, inside a little clear case and supply the judge with a magnifier !

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Progress on my model of Coniston signal box ... just about finished the upper section. Next the roof.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_1591_1024_zpsb6krypdh.jpg

 

Full details on the Pennine Group blog - http://pennine2mm.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Regards,

 

David V.

 

Oh dear, it looks like the poor signal man has waited far too long for the privy to be built that he has had a little accident by the armchair!   :O  :jester:

 

Lovely modelling though!

 

Ian

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Superb modelling on the chopper and the signal box and I thought that 2mm would need less detail than on my 7mm stuff.

Don

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Not so much what's on my workbench, as what has just come off it.  Some time ago the Association was selling off kits for the LNWR D88 van in a 2 for 1 offer as they had been badly packed and some of the parts were badly distorted and I bought 2 sets.  Out of the two worst damaged etches I managed to make up a rather decrepit body which now sits on the group layout 'Sauchenford'.  I built and painted one of them at the same time, finishing it in the 1908 livery with 'LNWR' and diamonds, and then decided to build the second as a through piped version.  I have only now got round to painting that one, this time in the 1912 livery without diamonds and with the diagonal white stripe signifying a piped van.  (I like a bit of variety!).

post-25077-0-35739800-1439577260_thumb.jpg

 

The stripe was a bit of a pain to do, as the bow pen only applied paint to the surface of the planks, so i had to infill the rather wide plank joints with a fine brush.

 

Jim

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More output from the wagon works  as usual no couplings ( does anyone know how to form a DG Loop easily?  :banghead:  )

 

 

 

Eddies designs 3d prints via shapeways 

 

 

 

Association MR wagon, the Cambrian  is  a 3d print via shapeways since withdrawn a great shame  as all it needed was a tweek to one axle box 

 

 

Edited by nick_bastable
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More output from the wagon works  as usual no couplings ( does anyone know how to form a DG Loop easily?  :banghead:  )

 

 

I just spent a whole day making DGs:) It is a bit time consuming but I find using the bending jig as per instructions gets you most of the way. Wrap a few turns of the PB wire, hold tight and cut through them, trying not to let the loops turn into ping-f**kits in the process. Square up with flat faced pliers.

 

To solder the dropper I hold the loop and dropper in a miniature wooden clothes peg, squared of at the ends of the jaw, with 2-3mm poking out. Solder then turn round and make the rest of the joint. The peg will tend to soak up the flux at first.

 

Andrew

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Here are some more pics of my Midland six wheel brake van, now painted and awaiting light weathering.

 

post-12813-0-17377000-1440588489_thumb.jpg

 

post-12813-0-70265100-1440588433_thumb.jpg

 

A bit rough and ready in places (solebars) but I'll settle for how its turned out.

 

Nig H

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It looks good to me Nigel these close ups are most unforgiving. Running on a layout it will look superb.

 

Don

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I just spent a whole day making DGs:) It is a bit time consuming but I find using the bending jig as per instructions gets you most of the way. Wrap a few turns of the PB wire, hold tight and cut through them, trying not to let the loops turn into ping-f**kits in the process. Square up with flat faced pliers.

 

To solder the dropper I hold the loop and dropper in a miniature wooden clothes peg, squared of at the ends of the jaw, with 2-3mm poking out. Solder then turn round and make the rest of the joint. The peg will tend to soak up the flux at first.

 

I usually put the jig in the vice once I've wrapped the wire around it. A good squeeze across both axes helps to get the bends a bit tighter. Then clamp it so that the short side is uppermost and cut through the embryonic loops with a triangular file. No pinging involved.

 

I generally do loops in batches - that way I get my 'eye in' with soldering the droppers. For the dropper, I leave the wire on the coil and just bend the end over. Then clean it with a fibreglass brush, blu tack the loop to some wood and solder them together. Give the thing a damned good pull before deciding that the joint is good... or re-make the join. I then cut the dropper off the coil, leaving it over length to be bent and trimmed when finally fitting to the vehicle. Bung the whole lot into a 35mm film canister (remember them?) to await some more wagons or whatever.

 

Regards, Andy

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The latest bit of signal related sillyness for St Ruth. This one is dedicated to all of those people who talk to us at the roadshow and then leave with the departing comment that their eyesight isn't good enough. On this occasion, they might be right...

 

It will hopefully be a model based on the circa 1961 Penzance home signal and will be used as the branch home. Unfortunately it will be sited towards the rear of the layout facing the branch trains so 99% of people probably won't ever see that it works (if it ever does).

 

Here's the plan, plus the second attempt at the tricky part.

 

post-9623-0-68637700-1440711535_thumb.jpg

 

The two specks of dirt above and to the right are actually not dirt at all. These are the remains of the first attempt. This went floorwards while being tested. When I picked it up I found that the LED had snapped in two. These things are only 0.4mm thick, 0.8mm wide and 1.6mm long.

 

It works! Now I just need to do three more and build the rest of the signal. Not sure about the colour though - it's labelled as amber but it's bit more yellow than I had in mind.

 

post-9623-0-20641900-1440711550_thumb.jpg

 

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More output from the wagon works  as usual no couplings ( does anyone know how to form a DG Loop easily?  :banghead:  )

 

You do know that you can buy them ready made from MSE don't you, Nick?

 

Regards,

 

David V

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So... thanks to the people for the 'clever' ratings, but it turns out that it wasn't so clever at all.

 

Trying to add the second LED to the assembly resulted in neither of them lighting up. Then trying to fix that caused the metal pads to come adrift from the first LED, so that's two LEDs broken now.

 

Time for a re-think...

 

I'd been trying to avoid using a PCB to keep the thickness to a minimum but I think that I've now proved that these LEDs are too fragile to be used without some sort of structural backing, so I decided that it was to mount the LEDs in more or less the manner for which they were intended.

 

So Mark 2 uses a bit of 0.4mm PCB gapped down the middle and also subdivided on one side. The central gap needs to be pretty wide - the metal pads on the back of the LEDs extend quite a long way across and overlap each other. Most likely my earlier problem was dur to shorting. On the Mark 2 each LED was checked under a magnifying glass to ensure that the pads didn't bridge the gap.

 

Here's the result - with all four LEDs mounted and tested. It isn't very pretty up close like this.

 

post-9623-0-42364300-1440795083_thumb.jpg

 

Next step is to try to trim the thing to size without breaking anything.

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Make your own thin PCB to any thickness you want with self adhesive copper foil on plasitcard.

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Make your own thin PCB to any thickness you want with self adhesive copper foil on plasitcard.

Trouble is the plasticard will melt when you try to solder anything to the copper foil!

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Trouble is the plasticard will melt when you try to solder anything to the copper foil!

 

Ordinary card give a coat of knotting might do alright.

Don

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Ordinary card give a coat of knotting might do alright.

Don

How about using the strip that you can get for edging kitchen worktops?  It looks like Formica or similar.

 

Jim

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Thanks for all of the suggestions. For the time being I will persevere with the 0.4mm PCB. It's not too big an increase in thickness because the previous design would have needed something to form the back of the route indicator box. Now the PCB can be the back.

 

Regards, Andy

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Work continues on Coniston signal box, with a roof added and tiled ... and another signal box build begins, with the front windows for Lightcliffe having been put together over the last couple of days.

 

IMG_1622_1024_zps4r10xkwz.jpg

 

IMG_1624_1024_zpsetayifc8.jpg

 

IMG_1625_1024_zpsi8khddlb.jpg

 

IMG_1623_1024_zpsc9zu8mgz.jpg

 

415b1259-194f-4c7b-a518-8a1996e3ac5e_zps

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Another 'just off the workbench (desk)'.

 

The MR traction truck was another which was built and painted before we moved house, but now I've got round to giving it a load.

 

The Flleetline 8hp stationary engine has been lying in the gloat box for many years and is a rather crude white metal casting, but once painted and given some rust it will past muster, '2 foot rule' etc.,etc.

 

post-25077-0-66515100-1442264959_thumb.jpg

 

The chain is 3 strands of fine copper wire from mains cable platted together then run through a match flame to take the shine off it.   Again, it won't stand too close examination, but looks the part IMHO.

 

Jim

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