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Whats on your 2mm Work bench

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Even though the brakes might not be immediately visible, their absence might be!  I had this experience with the first 6-wheeled coaches i built many years ago.  I thought the brake blocks would be invisible behind the lower footboards, but when they were finished something just didn't look right.  The overhang at the ends looked to be too long, but checking showed the dimension to be correct.  It then dawned on me that the brake blocks made the wheels look 'fatter' and so reduced the apparent end overhang.

 

As to making them, some wagon underframe etches have extra sets of brakes (eg. where there is a choice of single side or both sides brakes).  You could chop up the left overs to get what you need.  I have quite a pile.  Contact me off list if you would like some.

 

Jim

I thought it would need something in there. I have a few left over etches and mangled underframes that should give up enough brakes to do the job.

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that is looking very nice and been partial to brake vans is there a plan on line for one of these ?  ( thinking it may make a nice laser cut version  :scratchhead: )

 

cant help with the weight thing but it is a subject I have been thinking about with light wagons etc  going walkies when pushed 

 

NIck

I don't know of a plan online. The drawing I used is from LNER wagons Vol 1.

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I've come back to the brake van I started sometime in March. It needs a roof, foot boards, and possibly brakes. I say possibly because once the foot boards are there I'm not sure they'll be visible and I have no idea how to do them either. Thoughts welcomed. Also, is there a recommended weight for brakevans? This is very light and I'm a bit worried about it staying on the track.

 

Great Northern 20T Brakevan:

IMG_9419_zpsr913roki.jpg

 

Coming along very nicely, Gareth.

 

I'm not sure that brake vans need to be treated any differently to other small vehicles when it comes to weight. Most of my short, non-bogie stock weighs in at between 6 and 10 grammes, although I did get a bit carried away with one van which comes in at 12 grammes! If you haven't already got one, a small digital scale such as this is useful for 2mm scale:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Handy-POCKET-Size-Small-Mini-Digital-Weighing-Weigh-Scale-0-1g-1kg-measurement-/272438567023?hash=item3f6e9aa06f:g:-5wAAOSwwo1XclLg

It's from Ebay UK but I'm sure that Ebay US would have something similar. No use for a larger scale as it's not big enough!

 

David

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OK, not 2mm finescale. But on my workbench, and a model train  - unlike some other thread on here :-)

 

The real thing is what pulls (or pushes) me nearly every day. Although we don't often get the CFL-Cargo branded ones.

 

Chris

attachicon.gifDSCF1774.JPG

 

What should appear on the 16:18 Luxembourg - Troisvierges tonight but 4011 in CFL-Cargo livery. Modelling the current railway scene does have its advantages.

 

Chris

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Long while since I posted anything on the P2, Lord President. I have been putting some stuff on Tony Wright's thread where valve gear has been discussed, but thought I would copy over the last post to here for completeness.

 

Continuing with valve gear, I have just fitted the radius rod to the LH side of Lord President (RH side was already complete). The top joint needs to be very small indeed to fit inside the valve trunk guide, to able to drive the valve in it's guide and make connection via the combination lever with the union link to the cross head. I have developed a way of making very small forked joints by bending the valve gear component in question into an eye, which serves as the pivot as well as the side arms of the forked joint.

 

The first photo shows the beginnings of the loop at the cylinder end of the radius rod. If you are worried about the metal work hardening and breaking on bending, then heating to red heat will restore ductility.

 

2s6vev5.jpg

 

Second photo shows the metal tongue folded back onto itself and soldered in place. The same technique was used in the valve rod and also for the guide drive pin in the expansion link. This had to be made to work in the inner face of the link with the main rod sandwiched between, and passing behind, the pivot in the front face: the link was fretted out of stainless steel.

 

2jfaxky.jpg

 

Next photo shows it joined up in forward gear

 

qqwf49.jpg

 

and reverse

 

2cdwlck.jpg

 

The supporting bracket for the expansion link is quite chunky on my model, as it is on the real thing: many models have this a bit flimsy, especially when using etches.

 

2r5b3g7.jpg

 

I am now really looking forward to making the eccentric rods and return cranks. These should be fairly straightforward.

 

If I have time, I might select a few pictures and make a summary thread of LP's construction, so that it's all in one place.

 

Tim

Edited by CF MRC
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The ground surface is my usual DAS slurry.

Jim, I'm sure you have told us before but I cannot find the information - how do you turn the DAS into a slurry?

Thanks

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Jim, I'm sure you have told us before but I cannot find the information - how do you turn the DAS into a slurry?

Thanks

3 simple steps:

 

1) Take a plastic container with a lid (M & S deli filler tubs are ideal - eat the contents first!)

2)  Put an inch or so of water in the contained along with a chunk of DAS and replace the lid

3)  Examine it every couple of days and chop up the chunk of DAS as it softens and stir it until such time as it forms a slurry.  If it looks like it's going to be too thick, add more water.  If it gets too thin add more DAS and wait another day or two for that to soften. 

 

The consistency you make it depends on what you want to use it for.  If it is simply to form a thin layer of 'ground surface' make it the consistency of thick paint and apply with a soft paint brush (I use a No 9).  If you want it to make the ground cover over the scenic base, then make it more the consistency of thick plaster and apply it with a spatula.  Either way you can mould and shape it and also add powder or artists acrylic paint as required.   I also add a wee spot of PVA, just to help it adhere to the substrate.  You can easily blend new bits into old bits by soaking the old part to soften it first.

 

HTH,

 

Jim

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A Bergeon watch makers vice, which I have had for 35 years. There are cheaper versions as well: I have one for my portable workbench.

https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/screw-down-1-45mm-jaw-watchmakers?code=V1826

Also very decent pliers and tweezers.

 

A particularly useful link, Tim. Thank you. I've been looking for a top-quality precision vice for ages. Now I've found it! Just gotta save all those 19,995 pennies first...  :)

Edited by Phil Copleston

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3 simple steps:

 

1) Take a plastic container with a lid (M & S deli filler tubs are ideal - eat the contents first!)

2)  Put an inch or so of water in the contained along with a chunk of DAS and replace the lid

3)  Examine it every couple of days and chop up the chunk of DAS as it softens and stir it until such time as it forms a slurry.  If it looks like it's going to be too thick, add more water.  If it gets too thin add more DAS and wait another day or two for that to soften. 

 

The consistency you make it depends on what you want to use it for.  If it is simply to form a thin layer of 'ground surface' make it the consistency of thick paint and apply with a soft paint brush (I use a No 9).  If you want it to make the ground cover over the scenic base, then make it more the consistency of thick plaster and apply it with a spatula.  Either way you can mould and shape it and also add powder or artists acrylic paint as required.   I also add a wee spot of PVA, just to help it adhere to the substrate.  You can easily blend new bits into old bits by soaking the old part to soften it first.

 

HTH,

 

Jim

Brilliant Jim, thank you.

 

Stephen

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A particularly useful link, Tim. Thank you. I've been looking for a top-quality precision vice for ages. Now I've found it! Just gotta save all those 19,995 pennies first...  https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_smile3.gif

I've got one of the cheaper copies Phil and, whilst it's probably not as good as a Bergeron, it's still pretty good

 

Jerry

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Further progress on the diorama.  The warehouse roof has now been slated and the rhones and rhone pipes have been fitted.  The latter will need their paintwork touching up a little as my tin of brown paint is getting to the 'unusable' stage and the local ironmonger (who stocks everything, literally from a needle to a pitchfork, including Humbrol enamels) is closed until Thursday.

 

post-25077-0-08937300-1483476818_thumb.jpg

 

Weeds are currently starting to appear along the fence line and at the back of the Weighbridge office.

 

Jim

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Made good progress on Lord President over the last couple of days. Completed the eccentric rods and return cranks, as can be seen in the pictures below. I have also included a few to show how I hold small bits of valve gear, none of which would be possible without a decent vice.

 

The two eccentric rods were made out of one strip of steel, with holes for the return crank bearing at each end. The fluting was graved out of the steel using a marking gauge (as in previous posts). I use rods (broaches in this view) in the holes to locate the piece in the vice.

 

2872muq.jpg

 

The centre section that was to be reduced for the front pivot was marked up with a black felt tip pen and then filed out, as can be seen in the second photo. The fluting is also visible.

 

t5ggp3.jpg

 

2echh95.jpg

 

A round second cut file (v.small round needle file, visible on the LHS) was used to cut the curves on the rod side of the return crank bearing, prior to using a bigger file to take down the width of the rods, towards the fluted area.

 

e681s6.jpg

 

I only use Vallorbe files that are exceedingly sharp.

 

166dngx.jpg

 

The two rods were separated and the roughed out rod can now be seen

 

wa4so1.jpg

 

The thin end was then bent round to start to make the forked joint at the expansion link. The photo shows it ready to be attached. The fine end was filed to be found and the back face of the rod and the hook end tinned, prior to placing through the expansion link hole, thence closing the end back on to the rod and sweating the two pieces together with a dry soldering iron. The loop that pivots in the expansion link was coated in marker pen ink to act as an anti-flux and so prevent solder flowing where it was not wanted.

 

23r2wrd.jpg

 

The valve gear assembly shows the very minimal forked joint possible with this technique. I don't think such a discrete joint could be made with conventional pins.

 

2m6qqvr.jpg

 

The return crank was made up from similar steel sheet but doubled up and silver soldered at the base to hold a 16 BA thread. The return crank / eccentric rod bearing was made from a brass pin. These are quite large on Gresley engines.

 

2pyug6a.jpg

 

The main drive crank pin is a steel 16 BA bolt, and a brass shell bearing was made to go over this so as to give the return crank a positive stop when tightened up (it will eventually have a wipe of solder when the engine is complete).

 

2vxr2hw.jpg

 

Photo of the completed valve gear in forward and reverse and some photos of the real thing. The model is a bit crude in comparison, especially when magnified, but I don't think the components could be much thinner and still all work.

 

34owyz4.jpg

 

j90w3s.jpg

 

5v0yfr.jpg

 

fwlo5g.jpg

 

Finally, I made a video of the valve gear turning over under thumb power. Apologies for the awkward orientation and dirge-like music that was playing on Classic FM.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gJud0IQhI14&sns=em

 

Another video added with easier orientation.

 

https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=em-upload_owner&v=fUTQ5Ibe1Bk

 

Rather a long post, this one!

Tim

Edited by CF MRC
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The model is a bit crude in comparison, especially when magnified, but I don't think the components could be much thinner and still all work.

"Crude"? That is utterly incredible Tim - I can't even begin to imagine being able to work to this level of accuracy and precision so consistently! I can't wait to see the finished loco!

 

There was me feeling pleased at finally managing to rig up a satisfactory drive from a 1mm shaft Association motor to the worm on the etched Association Jinty chassis I'd shoved in a drawer months ago when the worm kept fouling (Using a UJ to make the motor removable/adjustable and allowing the worm to run with both 1.5mm bearings as designed)

 

Justin

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My "adventures" in scratch-building a chassis for a small 2-4-0 tender locomotive (Canada Works) continue:

 

gallery_11426_3848_61257.jpg

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Finally finished the 'Challenge' diorama (or at least as far as it is going to be finished).

 

post-25077-0-55648000-1483560496_thumb.jpg

post-25077-0-88277900-1483560487_thumb.jpg

post-25077-0-81353300-1483560506_thumb.jpg

post-25077-0-77309500-1483560530_thumb.jpg

 

499 has jut propelled a raft of loaded wagons over the weighbridge and is about to start drawing them back to be weighed as one of the staff arrives for his shift.  Meanwhile at the warehouse, while the proprietors' own wagon lies empty, there has just been a delivery of some fencing wire from a well known manufacturer in the North East of England.

 

This exercise has been useful in a number of ways in experimenting with some techniques for Kirkallanmuir.  It has also reminded me that I don't like making buildings   :nono:  and i won't be using card as extensively in the future, but i suppose they are a necessary evil!!

I am starting to suffer from serious soldering withdrawal symptoms - I think I feel some signals coming on!! :)

 

Jim

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Jim, that looks gorgeous. Amazing what you managed to do in a space only two-thirds of an A4 sheet !

 

Graham

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Made good progress on Lord President over the last couple of days. Completed the eccentric rods and return cranks, as can be seen in the pictures below. I have also included a few to show how I hold small bits of valve gear, none of which would be possible without a decent vice.

 

The two eccentric rods were made out of one strip of steel, with holes for the return crank bearing at each end. The fluting was graved out of the steel using a marking gauge (as in previous posts). I use rods (broaches in this view) in the holes to locate the piece in the vice.

 

2872muq.jpg

 

The centre section that was to be reduced for the front pivot was marked up with a black felt tip pen and then filed out, as can be seen in the second photo. The fluting is also visible.

 

t5ggp3.jpg

 

2echh95.jpg

 

A round second cut file (v.small round needle file, visible on the LHS) was used to cut the curves on the rod side of the return crank bearing, prior to using a bigger file to take down the width of the rods, towards the fluted area.

 

e681s6.jpg

 

I only use Vallorbe files that are exceedingly sharp.

 

166dngx.jpg

 

The two rods were separated and the roughed out rod can now be seen

 

wa4so1.jpg

 

The thin end was then bent round to start to make the forked joint at the expansion link. The photo shows it ready to be attached. The fine end was filed to be found and the back face of the rod and the hook end tinned, prior to placing through the expansion link hole, thence closing the end back on to the rod and sweating the two pieces together with a dry soldering iron. The loop that pivots in the expansion link was coated in marker pen ink to act as an anti-flux and so prevent solder flowing where it was not wanted.

 

23r2wrd.jpg

 

The valve gear assembly shows the very minimal forked joint possible with this technique. I don't think such a discrete joint could be made with conventional pins.

 

2m6qqvr.jpg

 

The return crank was made up from similar steel sheet but doubled up and silver soldered at the base to hold a 16 BA thread. The return crank / eccentric rod bearing was made from a brass pin. These are quite large on Gresley engines.

 

2pyug6a.jpg

 

The main drive crank pin is a steel 16 BA bolt, and a brass shell bearing was made to go over this so as to give the return crank a positive stop when tightened up (it will eventually have a wipe of solder when the engine is complete).

 

2vxr2hw.jpg

 

Photo of the completed valve gear in forward and reverse and some photos of the real thing. The model is a bit crude in comparison, especially when magnified, but I don't think the components could be much thinner and still all work.

 

34owyz4.jpg

 

j90w3s.jpg

 

5v0yfr.jpg

 

fwlo5g.jpg

 

Finally, I made a video of the valve gear turning over under thumb power. Apologies for the awkward orientation and dirge-like music that was playing on Classic FM.

 

 

Another video added with easier orientation.

 

 

Rather a long post, this one!

Tim

 

As amazing as this is, I personally am looking forward to the animated driver engaging forward/reverse gear  :no:

 

I guess we should just award Tim the 2017 Groves trophy now and be done with it  :sungum:

 

Seriously though, what a fine piece of modelling !! 

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I'm working on the driver Ian, but I don't think you will see him working inside the P2 cab, especially with the tarpaulin cover between cab and tender.

 

Tim

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Made good progress on Lord President over the last couple of days...   Rather a long post, this one!

Tim

 

 

I find this sort of stuff absolutely staggering Tim: So small, so intricate, so finely engineered, not to mention the level of skill, knowledge and patience which must be required.

 

Although many of us know we will never achieve such fine standards - your posts spur us on to push ourselves to our own personal limits with whatever level of modelling we are comfortable with / able to achieve with the (sometimes limited)  resources we have.

 

For that reason, if no other,  I always look forward to, and am inspired by, your updates.                                      

Edited by Southernboy

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Finished the other side of the valve gear on Lord President today.

Underside view shows clearances and the chunky nature of the bearing surfaces.

 

9rllwx.jpg

 

Now this is done I think it's time to return to the more relaxing body work and make the streamlined faring at the front. This is a bit tricky as there is a bulge over the cylinders on a P2 and of course it will need to be insulated from the brass cylinders themselves - no major problem with that - but getting the smooth shape transistions will be.

 

9hqfjp.jpg

 

e1f9sx.jpg

 

Filing and polishing the shape out of thick sheet is probably the favoured option, or perhaps a press tool if that doesn't work. Filling the flared bits with solder probably won't be an option as the side valances will need to be soldered to the body.

 

Tim

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