Jump to content
Following a software upgrade the Classifieds section is out of action. I'm working to resolve this. ×
 

Tri-ang bogie brick wagon


roythebus
 Share

Recommended Posts

I picked up one of these at a secondhand shop on Saturday for £10. ISTR reading it's quite an accurate model, so I'm looking to superdetail it and there may have been an article on here how to do it. Any ideas?

 

This example has plastic bogies  rather than the original Mazak type. these have been fitted from new as the rivets have never been touched.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a couple of photos on my website which may be of interest. Search Brick and they are in LNER opens. Note that the GN and LNER versions differ in the end stanchions, IIRC the Triang model is of the LNER style. They are very nice models.

 

Paul

PS if ever there was a photograph to show how little interest there was in wagons in the 1960s it is that one being used for spoil during the reconstruction of Euston Station. It was really prominent and must have been passed by hundreds of men that would claim to be railway enthusiasts - even specialising in history etc. But I've never seen another. I was barely 16 when I took that photo!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

As Paul says a nice model and probably responsible for the non-appearance of a Dublo or Trix version. It was very popular in tinplate days and was available from most manufacturers.

 

The Tri-ang model needs some attention to the brake gear* and new bogies. New buffers would also be an improvement. GNR ones had oval buffers originally (and probably kept them?).

 

*The right hand brake lever has been cut short to allow the bogie to rotate more than on the prototype.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I await the muffled screams from the collectors..

 

The collectable one is the early version with the brick load (mine was weathered etc. decades ago - not long after I bought it new!). The model is actually quite common.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't heard any muffled screams yet! I done the deed yesterday and lowered the wagon on the bogies by some 3mm by removing the bogies and filing away the huge bosses with the Dremel! How DO you get those Triang bogie rivets out without destroying half the wagon? 

 

I filed the axle boxes down to make them flat-ended as per the pictures, next job to fit Kadees. Any idea where I can get GNR oval buffers?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't heard any muffled screams yet! I done the deed yesterday and lowered the wagon on the bogies by some 3mm by removing the bogies and filing away the huge bosses with the Dremel! How DO you get those Triang bogie rivets out without destroying half the wagon? 

 

I filed the axle boxes down to make them flat-ended as per the pictures, next job to fit Kadees. Any idea where I can get GNR oval buffers?

 

The Tri-ang rivets can be removed by drilling - block the rivet and drill slowly to not melt the plastic.

 

Can't help with the GNR buffers I'm afraid.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Or, on some wagons, insert a razor saw blade?

 

There is usually some free play in the pivot.

 

Save the two rivet halve, and when it comes time to re-attach the bogie, use the two rivet halves, and find a piece of plastic sprue that is a nice tight fit inside the rivet....squeeze together to get required ride height.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The brick load is probably 'worth' more than the several wagons. I believe the plain starter version is the most sought after wagon - a pity because it's the easiest to detail, as there is do heat stamped (and incorrect*) lettering to cover up.

 

* What is "RETURN TO DEPOT" supposed to mean? and AFAIK none were ever marked "LONDON BRICK".

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine has "return to depot" on it, but as said earlier, a much later version with plastic bogies. I got the rivets out by bending the ends in with a screwdriver.

 

I filed the huge bosses off the underside of the body to lower it by about 3mm, fitted Kadees to the underside of the floor, and found some ABS LNER self-contained wagon buffers that look right. A cheap conversion for an afternoon's work! 

Link to post
Share on other sites

and AFAIK none were ever marked "LONDON BRICK".

I read that and I thought, "That can't be true". The reason is, as I said earlier, I have several including the plain starter version but they are all packed away in boxes atm except one, which I've had sitting on a shelf for a long while. Anyway this one does have London Brick heat printed on the sides, So I looked in Pat's books and there is no mention of it in there at all. The only one that had London Brick printed on it was the bright red one from the early 1970's.

 

Maybe I have a rare one. :)

 

 

post-19662-0-50225900-1420544027_thumb.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

* What is "RETURN TO DEPOT" supposed to mean? and AFAIK none were ever marked "LONDON BRICK".

Where applied,just plain 'BRICK' designation on the photos I have seen, but large letters. Where applied 'Return to Fletton' or  'Empty to Fletton' : presumably too specific for an item which Triang would hope to sell to any enthusiast?

 

It's an interesting specimen. When no other wagon in the range was anything but a pastiche, here's a wagon body which is a decent scale model, albeit slghtly marred by the heat printing. One might dream that they could have tooled everything to this standard...

 

Presumably the LNER's application of the 'BRICK' designation in large lettering was intended as advertising - likewise the 'SULPHATE' on the bogie wagons for that traffic? Most designations were smaller, other than 'LOCO' which was presumably useful to the staff in distinguishing the company's supply from the mass of PO's of generally similar outline. But a large bogie open on a specific 'round' of brickfield to London was hardly going to be difficult for the staff to pick out.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I read that and I thought, "That can't be true". The reason is, as I said earlier, I have several including the plain starter version but they are all packed away in boxes atm except one, which I've had sitting on a shelf for a long while. Anyway this one does have London Brick heat printed on the sides, So I looked in Pat's books and there is no mention of it in there at all. The only one that had London Brick printed on it was the bright red one from the early 1970's.

 

Maybe I have a rare one. :)

 

 

attachicon.gifIMG_8596.JPG

 

Trying to be brief, I wasn't clear as usual! I intended none of the real wagons were branded 'LONDON BRICK'. As company (later state) owned wagons it is unlikely they born any permanent P.O.lettering though used on a specific traffic (Fletton to London (hence the branding 'RETURN/EMPTY TO FLETTON' actually carried). Many/most wagon ranges had this one (Hornby had it in both 0 and 00 and Trix Twin in 00 for example and didn't see any problem putting the correct lettering.

 

Tri-ang's colour variations are legion, seemingly dependent on the plastic in stock at the time.

 

Apart from their habit of rendering planking grooves as a raised rib and the ride height, the SR Tri-ang Utility Van (that's what they called it), the GWR Horse Box  and the standard van and open wagon (of Trackmaster origin) were quite good models for the time. The LMS cattle wagon was unfortunately stretched to fit the standard underframe which spoiled an otherwise reasonable vehicle. The petrol tank was not too bad either. It did at least have the characteristic open underframe of the prototype (the milk tank version was of course rubbish as all these had 6 wheels - I'm ignoring the early 4 wheelers as anachronistic, but even these were longer.)

 

I have used the screwdriver method of removing the rivets, but there is a risk of gouging bits out of the model (or worse still fingers!) without extreme care.

Edited by Il Grifone
Link to post
Share on other sites

Tri-ang's colour variations are legion, seemingly dependent on the plastic in stock at the time.

 

The brown London Brick wagon is mentioned in Pat's book, I missed it the first time after having just a quick look. It belongs under the Triang Hornby banner of the early 70's but is an uncommon variant.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

Reawakening this topic, I have just bought an example via eBay for 'improving'. It is a variant that I have not seen before however. It has no buffers [and clearly never had them fitted either], has no lettering/numbering of any sort [and no marks where they may have once been] and is  a strange light orangey-brown in colour. before surgery commences, can anyone identify this model for me ? I don't want to destroy something which maybe - unlikely though I know - scarce. Nevertheless, it is still marked R 219 on the underside.

 

DSC_0045_zps0wc3p2eo.jpg

 

Thanks.

 

Tony

Edited by Prometheus
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Reawakening this topic, I have just bought an example via eBay for 'improving'. It is a variant that I have not seen before however. It has no buffers [and clearly never had them fitted either], has no lettering/numbering of any sort [and no marks where they may have once been] and is  a strange light orangey-brown in colour. before surgery commences, can anyone identify this model for me ? I don't want to destroy something which maybe - unlikely though I know - scarce. Nevertheless, it is still marked R 219 on the underside.

 

DSC_0045_zps0wc3p2eo.jpg

 

Thanks.

 

Tony

 

It comes from a starter set. (presumably children aren't supposed to know about buffers - I certainly did!). I don't have any further details to hand, but I doubt it is very valuable (don't quote me on that!). The missing buffers save the trouble of pulling them out to fit something better (sometimes the bu**ers don't want to shift!).  :)

 

IIRC one of mine is similar to this, but more of a red-brown colour

Link to post
Share on other sites

It comes from a starter set. (presumably children aren't supposed to know about buffers - I certainly did!). I don't have any further details to hand, but I doubt it is very valuable (don't quote me on that!). The missing buffers save the trouble of pulling them out to fit something better (sometimes the bu**ers don't want to shift!).   :)

 

IIRC one of mine is similar to this, but more of a red-brown colour

Most likely they didn't want dear little children pulling the buffers out and swallowing them; just because you or I might struggle, doesn't mean 'Angelic Alfie' would.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It comes from a starter set. (presumably children aren't supposed to know about buffers - I certainly did!). I don't have any further details to hand, but I doubt it is very valuable (don't quote me on that!). The missing buffers save the trouble of pulling them out to fit something better (sometimes the bu**ers don't want to shift!).   :)

 

IIRC one of mine is similar to this, but more of a red-brown colour

 

The buffers, black paint and heat printing were left off to keep the cost down of the starter set.

Link to post
Share on other sites

...Apart from their habit of rendering planking grooves as a raised rib and the ride height, the SR Tri-ang Utility Van (that's what they called it), the GWR Horse Box  and the standard van and open wagon (of Trackmaster origin) were quite good models for the time...

 To which we may add the six wheel bogie 'Trestrol' a very neat model based on the LNER's Trestrol C design of 1938. (As a teen I thought this some kind of US design, as it figured heavily in their Battlesplat! range alongside many of the other Lionel sourced designs.)

 

But as better information has become available I now know that it is based on a UK vehicle, and for all it is roughly 10% underlength it remains comfortably the largest specially constructed vehicle model ever available in OO RTR. (A cut and paste job can produce two scale length vehicles from three, and since the general proportions of the very sharp mouldings are correct, this is well worthwhile.)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...