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Annie's Virtual Pre-Grouping, Grouping and BR Layouts & Workbench


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What a day!  I had to go back to the optometrist down in the township to pay my account and I thought that was done with.  It wasn't a bad morning for a walk and my daughter needed to do various things in the township anyway so I enjoyed getting out for some exercise.  I was even able to buy a really nice Greek salad at the grocer's shop on the way back home.   Only problem was when we arrived back home I tried my key in the lock to open the door and the lock wouldn't turn.  Nothing for it, but to call the local locksmith.

Fortunately my daughter had her phone with her.  Mine was in my room inside the house since I can never remember to take it with me and besides I can't see the screen well enough to see what it wants me to do when it squeaks and I hate it anyway.  

 

The locksmith arrived after about 20 minutes which I certainly couldn't complain about, - fortunately we both had some shelter from the sun and somewhere to sit down while we were waiting which was good because I was starting to feel  pretty darn tired by now.  Using a pair of impressively noisy powertools the locksmith was able to cut through the lock bolt and open the door for us.  The lock itself was quite old which wasn't surprising since my house was built in 1932 and it was fitted into the door in an arcane way which looked like it might make the lock difficult to replace.  However the locksmith took it away with him to his workshop and was back again about an hour later with the lock all nicely repaired.  He told me that he'd never seen a lock as worn as that one and plainly after I'd locked the door on leaving the house the lock had decided to die.  Fortunately as strange as my door lock was it's internal workings were fairly ordinary so it was possible to repair it and make it as good as new again.  I was presented with a bill which didn't look like anything enough for the trouble he'd gone to so I gave a bit more than that and told him not to argue.  Good and reliable tradespeople who give good service should always be properly rewarded as far as I'm concerned.

 

I was just settling down with a nice cup of tea when I decided to look at my much hated stupidphone and discovered that there was a message from the optometry clinic to say they'd made a mistake with my account and they'd only remembered that I need to have my new frames properly fitted once I'd gone and would I mind popping back in.  They must've phoned me after I'd left thinking I'm the kind of person who always carries their stupidphone with them in case I die of social media withdrawal.  Anyway I entertained my daughter for a few minutes with a display of advanced scowling and a rant about how much I hate leaving the house and how I don't like people much anyway before I eventually ran out of steam and drank my tea instead.

 

Hopefully I will be able to get my new ultra special reading specs before the world descends into the regular end of year madness, retail fury and greed that has nothing at all with any religious observance that I know of.   It's becoming more than a little annoying not being able to read anything without recourse to a powerful magnifying glass and I have a number of goods wagon and texturework projects I'd really like to be able to get on with that I can't do anything about at the moment.

 

Mf72Ruo.jpg

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4 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

 

There has been discussion of this vehicle somewhere on RMWeb, with, I think, photos of a derelict body, but I've not been able to track it down.

I don't know where the discussion is either Stephen, but if anyone know where to find it I'd be interested to know.  I could do with several of these ventilated fruit van conversions for use on the tramways.

 

kXPNaQx.jpg

 

rrsxlMp.jpg

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1 minute ago, Compound2632 said:

Do you have a date for the lower photo? John Rochford (?) & Sons would appear to be a species unknown to science...

Unfortunately no Stephen.  I can't even remember where I got the photo from or when I found it.  Normally if there's any information with a photo I'll file that away as well, but I have nothing for this one.

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Today's cheer up picture:  No.1072 built at Wolverhampton circa 1867-1871.  These  were the tank version of the famous ‘Standard Goods’ 0-6-0 tender engines.  Unfortunately No.1072 became a pannier tank in December 1924 and was withdrawn in May 1934.

In its short saddle tank form No.1072 is to my mind a perfect example of a 19th century locomotive and I'm very much delighted by this old photograph.

 

IBZcbMn.jpg

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Look at the wheels: 4’6” diameter. Later on, thicker tyres were fitted which took them up to 4’7½”. With wear and reprofiling, they could be turned down to maybe slightly less than the original size, but it meant a shorter stay in works: drop the wheels, get them in the wheel lathe, and refit them. Much quicker than the palaver of removing the old tyres and fitting new ones.

A very lovely engine, in my mind nicer than  no the buffaloes.

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1 hour ago, Regularity said:

A very lovely engine, in my mind nicer than the buffaloes.

I must agree, it really is a much more elegant engine than the Buffaloes.

 

Buffalo No.1232 pre-WW1.  Picture courtesy of gwr.org.uk

DmSBCXE.jpg

 

 

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14 hours ago, Annie said:

Today's cheer up picture:  No.1072 built at Wolverhampton circa 1867-1871.  These  were the tank version of the famous ‘Standard Goods’ 0-6-0 tender engines.  ,,,,,,,, In its short saddle tank form No.1072 is to my mind a perfect example of a 19th century locomotive....

I think part of the appeal of that photo of No.1072 is the profusion of tool boxes and other 'gubbins'.  I recognise the polished bell on the side of the bunker but what is the other polished circle on the side of the firebox?  I've never seen a toolbox high on the side of the firebox befire, either.  Then there are the various rods to the sandboxes - large at the front but is that a much smaller one between the drivers?

 

Mike

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15 minutes ago, MikeOxon said:

.........but what is the other polished circle on the side of the firebox? 

After enlarging the picture it looks like some kind of circular brass plate that possibly has lettering on it.  An award for being a really good engine perhaps?  A rebuild plate?  The mysteries of Wolverhampton are not for mere mortals it seems.

 

I must confess that I've not seen a toolbox mounted like that on any 19th century GWR engine before.  There's a photo of No.1051 on GWR.org.uk, but it has succumbed to a degree of creeping Swindonisation and looks to have been tidied up and pruned of extra equipment and attachments.

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3 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

The photographer was having an off day when it came to depth of field. Frustrating!

Ah, the old let's park this engine in front of these interesting wagons to frustrate the researchers of the future syndrome.

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2 hours ago, Annie said:

Ah, the old let's park this engine in front of these interesting wagons to frustrate the researchers of the future syndrome.

It gets most frustrating, when so much is documented about engines, a lesser amount about carriages , and d**n all about wagons!  I'm trying to find some information about early Broad Gauge wagons at the moment.

Mike

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29 minutes ago, MikeOxon said:

It gets most frustrating, when so much is documented about engines, a lesser amount about carriages , and d**n all about wagons!  I'm trying to find some information about early Broad Gauge wagons at the moment.

Mike

Yes it is frustrating Mike.  The unglamourous objects nobody took any notice of which leaves us trying to guess at details on blurry old photos.  I don't know about you, but I find the small sketches lacking in any real detail in the BGS data sheets to be more frustrating than actually of any real use.

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7 hours ago, MikeOxon said:

I think part of the appeal of that photo of No.1072 is the profusion of tool boxes and other 'gubbins'.  I recognise the polished bell on the side of the bunker but what is the other polished circle on the side of the firebox?  I've never seen a toolbox high on the side of the firebox befire, either.  Then there are the various rods to the sandboxes - large at the front but is that a much smaller one between the drivers?

 

Mike

 

It is interesting to speculate on the contents of the various boxes.  I imagine at least one would have had something like the Victorian equivalent of a big tin of Brasso.

Edited by Adam88
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Returning to the Aveling & Porter tramway engines again I've found a much better version of the Wotton Tramway photo that I posted earlier.  The loco crew seem to be doing something to the engine while it's running as that flywheel is definitely not stationary!  Health and Safety these days would have a fit.

 

JakAP2x.jpg

 

The coach at the end of the train looks like it could be this one.

 

LYyUgTK.jpg

Edited by Annie
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16 hours ago, Annie said:

Yes it is frustrating Mike.  The unglamourous objects nobody took any notice of which leaves us trying to guess at details on blurry old photos.  I don't know about you, but I find the small sketches lacking in any real detail in the BGS data sheets to be more frustrating than actually of any real use.

I’ve found a few useful drawings in Alan Prior’s book of 19th Century railway drawings.

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17 hours ago, Annie said:

  I don't know about you, but I find the small sketches lacking in any real detail in the BGS data sheets to be more frustrating than actually of any real use.

I find that they are useful when read together with the detailed description and references. Eddy brought together lots of information in one place.

Mike

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18 minutes ago, MikeOxon said:

I find that they are useful when read together with the detailed description and references. Eddy brought together lots of information in one place.

Mike

That's true and it is a help to have such information as is known collected together in one place and it would have been a monumental job to do it and for that the Society must be grateful, - it's just that I wish the drawings were a little clearer and were of a larger size (sigh).

 

1 hour ago, MikeOxon said:

I’ve found a few useful drawings in Alan Prior’s book of 19th Century railway drawings.

Yes I have a copy of that as well, - a very useful book.

 

16 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

I have that. But where did he get his info?

As fat as I can tell mostly from various 19th century treatises on railways and the locomotive by Zerah Colburn and others.

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More playing trains on the Tenpenny Branch.  I'm trying not to let myself get distracted too much by investigating the Wootton Tramway as I've got plenty of tramway mileage of my own that needs work and maintenance without ducking off and starting on another one. 

 

dcx3Toy.jpg

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