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Overseas railways worth modelling

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#26 whart57

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Posted 19 August 2017 - 09:15

Time to throw another in the mix

 

Many will be aware of the Maeklong Railway in Thailand where market traders have to collapse their stalls to allow the eight trains a day to pass on the last mile to the Maeklong terminus. Someone has even made an HO model of it with collapsing stalls. However the railway has a longer history than as a 21st century tourist attraction, and some stuff is still around to form the basis of a layout.

 

The Maeklong railway is actually two railways - the Thachin Railway from Bangkok to Mahachai and the Maeklong Railway from Ban Laem (on the opposite bank of the river from Mahachai) to Maeklong. The companies merged sometime early in the 20th century and were nationalised after WW2. Like the rest of the Thai railways they are meter gauge.

 

In the early years the railway was operated by two classes of small tank locos built by Krauss, examples of both still survive as static displays.

 

MRC_0-4-2T.JPG

 

The 0-4-2T were originally for the Thachin Railway

 

MRC_2-4-0T.JPG

 

and the 2-4-0T were originally for the line to Maeklong though they were apparently all used on both lines and similar (or even the same) locos appeared on the Pak Nam railway East of Bangkok. (The TRC loco is now repainted and on display in Pak Nam)

 

Drawings of both were in Continental Modeller a few years ago

 

As for passenger stock, we might have to guess. Something like this 4-wheel coach now in use as a children's library won't be too far out

 

library_train_bangsue1.jpg

 

And for goods stock, this old van receiving a bit of TLC at Mahachai works is probably an old Thachin Railway original

 

Mahachai_oldvan.JPG

 

This might be a suitable layout for doing in S-scale (1:64) on 16.5mm gauge track. I'm not an expert in HO ready to run but I'd guess there are suitable small tanks with the right wheel base to form the basis of the loco types

 

 


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#27 rue_d_etropal

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Posted 19 August 2017 - 10:05

I might suggest some of the French local electrified lines(metre gauge often), some very remote, certainly not urban.

I am planning a model of part of the CF de Camargue, which was electrified early in 20th century, but only survived up to late 50s. I only came across it by a chance conversation with Giles Barnabe, who mentioned the system was metre gauge. I had seen some embankments from part of the route, but assumed they were standard gauge. As they were elecrified they are different to what many think of as a French metre gauge line. I now have a lot of information, including a very thorough article published a few years ago, in French, and have scoured the internet for any information and photos I can find. The main station at Arles actually still exists, as does much of the workshop , now used as some type of council depot I think. The one piece of info I can not find is the colour used to paint locos and stock. I have not come across any colour photos.

Many of these lightweight electrified lines are possibly considerd tramways by some modellers, but are just as much railways, and should not be ignored by railway modellers. A few tantalising old photos wet the appetite, but finding detailed information, in particular scale drawings, can be difficult. If buildings and infrasture still exist Google map can help a lot.



#28 Dutch_Master

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Posted 19 August 2017 - 12:50

Further to both previous messages:

 

The Swiss RhB sold a fair number of their obsolete G4/5 loco's to Indochina/Thailand after the RhB network was extensively electrified. Some still survive! Bemo makes an H0m model of it ;)

 

There are several electric NG lines in France, one crosses the Alps into Switzerland: Martiny-Chamonix is a mixed overhead/3rd rail operation still active.


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#29 whart57

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Posted 19 August 2017 - 13:46

The minor conversion required - putting higher tender rails on and filling the tender with wood logs - shouldn't be that difficult. Not that those locos ever ran on the Maeklong lines.


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#30 Dutch_Master

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Posted 19 August 2017 - 13:50

Who's gonna know? ;)


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#31 EddieB

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Posted 19 August 2017 - 14:07

The Swiss RhB sold a fair number of their obsolete G4/5 loco's to Indochina/Thailand after the RhB network was extensively electrified. Some still survive! Bemo makes an H0m model of it ;)

 

The ex-Rhaetian 2-8-0s went to the Royal State Railway, not the Maeklong Railway.  Twelve were supplied in 1926, followed by a further six in 1927.  Two survive in preservation (a third is suggested, but never confirmed).  There is a dimensioned side elation in Ramaer's "The Locomotives of Thailand" (as for many of the other RSR lociomotive types).   As whart57 says, extending the tender rails would be necessary to reflect the change from coal to wood burning.



#32 5944

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 08:42

I'd love to model some of the Eritrean railway system. 950mm gauge, so 4mm scale on 12mm track wouldn't look too wrong. However, the thought of scratch building half a dozen 0-4-4-0T Mallets puts me off a bit!
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#33 whart57

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 08:48

You could try S scale on 16.5mm gauge track and see whether it is feasible to build those Mallets using commercial mechs



#34 modfather

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 10:33

New Zealand metre gauge seems a bit left out, there's s scale using ho track or train using n track and some phenomenal modelling including a runnof kits designed by mr edge.

#35 Michael Edge

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 11:54

NZ is 3ft 6in, not metre gauge, Kiwi modellers use a bewildering variety of scales. The largest I have done is 9mm:1ft which uses O gauge track, latest is 1:48th, using S scale track. We have done some etches in HO/1:87 which gives 3ft 6in with HOm track.


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#36 modfather

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 22:03

My mistake, I haven't yet found HOm but the kit in 9mm scale has been made into some beautiful models.

#37 Pacific231G

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 23:24

It has been modelled by a few of our French counterparts but the metre gauge Tramways de Correze are very deserving and probably my choice for the lost railway I'd visit first if I could get my hands on the TARDIS just once.

The TC was a bucolic roadside tramway that threw itself over a river gorge on the breathtaking Rochers-Noirs "Gisclard" suspension bridge. When its last line closed at the end of 1959 it had been the last of France's rural steam tramways in general public service thanks to the diffiulties of road transport in this part of the Massif Central. It had also been one of the last to be built, with most of its lines opened in the two years before the First World War.

 

TC -Viaduc_des_Rochers_Noirs_coté_Lapleau (CC) .JPG

Until 1983 the viaduct was open to cars and as well as being dramatic it was a useful short cut. After 1983 It only open for pedestrians but even that ended in 2005.  

 

I did get as far as building an H0e (false metre gauge) model of one of the 060T Piguets that operated the line along with a few of its wagons but didn't get to see the one preserved example until four years ago at the Baie de Somme's 2013 festival of steam

 

TC Piguet CFBS2013.jpg

 

A surprising amount of the line's infrastructure has survived including many of the station buildings - several now restored- a stone water tower the main loco depot a Le Mortier-Gummond (now a garage) and two viaducts.

 

There's film of the railway in action a coupe of years before it closed here https://www.youtube....h?v=gt4EhfaMupc

and here https://www.youtube....h?v=Ez4oIU67Z5E

 

and there have been several good books about the line


Edited by Pacific231G, 22 August 2017 - 09:34 .

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#38 whart57

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 06:52

For the really unusual and as an impossible challenge, how about a railway after a flood?

 

In 1953 there was severe flooding at many points around the North Sea. Canvey Island was badly hit and the Kent Coast line was breached. The latter would enable a modeller of Herne Bay station to operate it as a terminus. Worst hit though were the provinces of Zeeland and South Holland in the Netherlands. Whole islands in Zeeland disappeared and the death toll was only limited by the fact this was a rural area with a low population. Needless to say the railway from Bergen op Zoom to Vlissingen was washed out and being below sea level for much of the way was further flooded twice a day when the tide came in. However the local PW gang leader came up with a novel solution. As building an embankment was clearly out of the question, he suggested securing the track bed with a low dam. the line would still be covered at high tide but the dam would protect it from the scouring affect of the moving water as the tides changed. A low tech solution that could be achieved with the local workforce and locally available materials. This is what it looked like:

 

railwayline_zeeland_1953.jpg

 

 

Once the work was done there was time to run a pair of goods trains at low tide. The trains were ready to go as the water dropped and as soon as the lines were clear a Sik (a light 4 wheel diesel shunter) was sent out to check the line and clear any debris. Then the single track was briefly open for goods trains. The island of Walcheren had been largely unaffected by the flood but the towns of Middelburg and Vlissingen needed coal and food supplies so this workaround was literally a lifeline

 

Goodstrain_Zeeland_1953.jpg

 

Some interesting pictures were made of trains apparently running over the water. And the 3700 class at the front is available in HO from Artitec ..........

 

More recently we have had trains running through the floods in Thailand

 

Thai Flood Train.jpg

 

Modelling this could be messy though .....

 

 


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#39 fezza

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 16:21

Anyone for Sicilian metre gauge steam that lasted into the 1980s? The tracks were still there in many places when I last visited a few months ago. Great scenery, characterful stations, and varied stock... You can even buy some rtr if you look hard.

A tragedy that it closed... imagine if the Lynton and Barnstaple had lasted until the 1980s only to be shut for good in 1985.

Edited by fezza, 31 August 2017 - 16:23 .

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#40 brack

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 17:54

Look here:
http://scottpages.ne...ritiNgAway.html

For a layout of the tram from spirited away running through water - it is possible to run DC powered trains through water. Pure water is a very poor conductor, especially at the low voltages/currents we use, it's the dissolved ions in most water that makes it conductive, so deionised or distilled water is what you need.
Not sure I'd try it with DCC mind.
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#41 whart57

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 18:10

The Thai railway photo above shows the train headed by a loco that had been withdrawn from SRT service and sold or leased to the contractor doing line doubling work. The SRT had to borrow them back. They also had to press into service another class that had been laid aside. But then I suppose that those Krauss locos and the metre gauge version of the DB V160 in the photo, being diesel hydraulics, were better suited to "swimming" than the diesel electrics.

 

After the floods receded the track needed proper testing before trains could run at normal speed and there is a photo of the SRT using a dead steam engine as a mobile weight. Lord knows where they got that steamer from though, it wasn't one of the preserved steam fleet.


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#42 whart57

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 18:12

... imagine if the Lynton and Barnstaple had lasted until the 1980s only to be shut for good in 1985.

 

But you can be sure Lynton station would have received a fresh coat of paint in 1984 ........


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#43 EddieB

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 12:35

After the floods receded the track needed proper testing before trains could run at normal speed and there is a photo of the SRT using a dead steam engine as a mobile weight. Lord knows where they got that steamer from though, it wasn't one of the preserved steam fleet.


Do you have a photo, a link or any details of the steam loco?

#44 whart57

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 15:18

Try this:

 

http://www.railpictu...t/photo/381524/

 

I might be wrong about them not being in the preserved fleet, looking at the picture more closely the two locos might be Japanese built C56s without tenders and a couple of those are theoretically steamable.

 

What a train eh? Double-headed with a couple of GE UM12C diesel electrics, a dead steam loco, 3 or 4 four wheel vans, 3 four wheel brake vans and another dead steam loco. Note the red rag tied to coupling lifter bar to indicate the tail of the train.

 

A lighter engineering train is:

 

http://www.railpictu...t/photo/381353/


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#45 Andy Hayter

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 20:16

Look here:
http://scottpages.ne...ritiNgAway.html

For a layout of the tram from spirited away running through water - it is possible to run DC powered trains through water. Pure water is a very poor conductor, especially at the low voltages/currents we use, it's the dissolved ions in most water that makes it conductive, so deionised or distilled water is what you need.
Not sure I'd try it with DCC mind.

 

Distilled water is not ion free.  Indeed it is not even pH neutral (7.0).

 

Surprised?
  I know I was.

 

In the condensation process, the water dissolves CO2 and creates carbonic acid (pH 6.5) with carbonate and primarily bicarbonate ions.



#46 brack

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 22:08

Distilled water is not ion free. Indeed it is not even pH neutral (7.0).

Surprised?
I know I was.

In the condensation process, the water dissolves CO2 and creates carbonic acid (pH 6.5) with carbonate and primarily bicarbonate ions.


Yes - I actually teach science, the trouble with water is that it is a very effective solvent and it'll dissolve co2 and whatever it can find upon exposure to the air, but that's a lot less dissolved ions that rain or tap water, so distilled is certainly a far better electrical insulator (again, we say insulator but from a technical point of view there's no such thing, just poorer conductors) than using normal water (roughly about 1/1000 as conductive as typical tap water) particularly with a low current and voltage.

#47 dullsteamer

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 23:32

Try this:
 
http://www.railpictu...t/photo/381524/
 
I might be wrong about them not being in the preserved fleet, looking at the picture more closely the two locos might be Japanese built C56s without tenders and a couple of those are theoretically steamable.


Definitely C56s. I think they have tenders,they're just hard to see due to the tele-lens distortion.

Cheers,

Mark.

#48 whart57

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 06:26

Distilled water is not ion free.  Indeed it is not even pH neutral (7.0).

 

Surprised?
  I know I was.

 

In the condensation process, the water dissolves CO2 and creates carbonic acid (pH 6.5) with carbonate and primarily bicarbonate ions.

 

Jeez that takes me back. In the 1970s I worked as a lab technician in a school and we made our own distilled water using a glass still. One day the subject for first year science was acids and alkalis, teacher (actually Head of Science) handed out the indicator strips along with a range of chemicals for the kids to try. All the kids reported water was acid. He decided they must have been messy workers and went to demonstrate water was pH neutral himself. Acid. Break time came to test a sample fresh from the still. Acid. Gave me a bollocking for not cleaning the still properly. I had descaled the still over the summer but surely after the gallons of distilled water produced since then any descaler would have washed out? Anyway, dismantled it, washed it through, sloshed ethanol around inside it to remove traces of the water that might be lingering with its acid components, put it back together, ran it for a while, tested a sample. Acid. This went on for weeks. Then one day I took a sample, heated it to boiling point and let it cool before testing. PH neutral. Still don't know why and what occurred but the next year I boiled all the water before giving it out to first year science to dip their indicator papers in.


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#49 jjb1970

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 18:50

The Rio Tinto mining railway in Spain has always struck me as a particularly interesting railway that'd make a great subject for a layout.
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#50 brack

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 20:23

The Rio Tinto mining railway in Spain has always struck me as a particularly interesting railway that'd make a great subject for a layout.


Absolutely, the Sierra Menera too - 4-8-0s, big NBL 0-6-6-0s and garratts. There's a load of Spanish metre gauge lines that have a lovely mix of British, German, French and Spanish built motive power but I've not seen much respresentation of them in model form, especially as its not that far away and some of these systems ran steam quite late on.
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