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About this blog

A record of weathering work, intended to show both good and bad results, including explanations of what is used and how.

Entries in this blog

A Busy Weekend

This weekend has been taken up with some weathering in unusual circumstances. Because the Missenden Abbey Railway Modellers Autumn weekend could not take place at the Abbey, an online event was arranged to provide some small compensation. This event included a little bit of weathering:   https://www.missendenrailwaymodellers.org.uk/index.php/virtual-missenden-recordings/

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick in Weathering

Accurascale HUO Hopper

This isn't the only place you can see examples of weathering. One of Accurascale's HUO hoppers has been worked on and the account of it can be seen here:   https://accurascale.co.uk/blogs/lets-get-involved/wagon-weathering-with-mick-bonwick-lets-get-involved

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Something Agricultural for Christmas

Back in the days of Summer I had a go at a 1/43rd scale Ferguson TE20 - a Little Grey Fergie. I had found a couple of these, after much searching, and wanted to work on one and leave the other pristine, just to show how much of a difference could be made with just Dullcote, washes and pigments. Unfortunately I didn't do a particularly good job when using my smartphone to take the photographs!     This will keep you going until January.   https://www.flickr.com/phot

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Hornby Peckett 0-6-0ST 'Westminster'. Step 12 - Final.

To finish off the dusty look I have continued to use the MIG Productions Industrial City Dirt. Small amounts have been taken from the inside of the lid of the pot and placed in areas where dust.would have built up in normal use. Where is that? Reference to photographs will provide the answer and I have been using Gordon Edgar's photographic books about industrial railways to help me in this task.   Study the photograph below and see where the differences are between the original model

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Hornby Peckett 0-6-0ST 'Westminster'. Step 11 - Pigments.

The cab roof has now had some MIG Productions Black Smoke pigment brushed on to represent the build-up of grot ejected by the chimney/funnel, and random applications of the same pigment and Industrial City Dirt have been made to parts of the running plate. This locomotive is to be portrayed in a quarry environment, so a layer of dust is needed to reflect that. The Industrial City Dirt is also applied to areas of the wheels, steps and areas where crew's boots would take the stone dust.  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Hornby Peckett 0-6-0ST 'Westminster'. Step 10 - Airbrushed Dirt.

Reference to many photographs of working Pecketts  has indicated that there are several areas where dirt seems to accumulate more than others. I have continued to apply the dark mix of frame dirt/weathered black to areas such as the leading edge and corner of the saddle tank, the upper corners of the coal bunker and the join between cab and tank. A simple waft was all that was needed, just to hint at the discolouration.   I also applied a small amount of this same colour to the wheel c

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Hornby Peckett 0-6-0ST 'Westminster'. Step 9 - Upper Surfaces.

The upper surfaces of a steam locomotive receive copious amounts of grot from the exhaust and, sometimes, the surrounding environment. This locomotive is intended for use in a quarry, so there will be some dust added to represent that. Later!   To begin with, the soot from the chimney will be represented by a predominantly black mix of Railmatch Frame Dirt and Weathered Black. Application is from my trusty Iwata Eclipse SBS, with successive light coats aimed roughly at the top of the s

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Hornby Peckett 0-6-0ST 'Westminster'. Step 8 - Wash Part 2.

Continuing to use the MIG Productions Dark Wash, a deliberately random application to the pipework and other equipment 'twixt saddle tank and running plate will result in a depiction of grime build-up and general dirtiness. A 'stain' has been left on the top surface of the running plate to add to the end result.      

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Hornby Peckett 0-6-0ST 'Westminster'. Step 7 - Wash Part 1.

Many areas of the locomotive accumulate dirt (says he, stating the obvious), and one way of representing this is to make use of a suitably coloured wash that will be attracted to corners and edges by capillary action. There is a vast quantity of washes available from many manufacturers, but I have been using MIG Productions Dark Wash for several years, still the same bottle as when I first started this weathering lark. I apply it by wetting the brush (a rigger) with white spirit and then dipping

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Hornby Peckett 0-6-0ST 'Westminster'. Step 5 - Buffer Beams.

The ends of the chassis are tackled next, repeating the application of light coats to start the discolouration process. The locomotive is left in the pretty blue cradle and a piece of card positioned to mask off the area above the running plate.     This process will have left the top of the buffer beam without paint, so off comes the cradle and the piece of card is repositioned to protect the bodywork again.     The same process is utilised to do the ot

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Hornby Peckett 0-6-0ST 'Westminster'. Step 4 - Chassis 2.

There is more than one way to weather wheels!   For this project I have chosen to show how to use a 9 volt battery to turn the wheels a quarter of a revolution at a time to avoid paint-less shadows behind the connecting rods and motion assembly.   The sequence of photographs should demonstrate how successive light coats of paint can be applied after each quarter revolution to cover up these areas.             Yo

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Hornby Peckett 0-6-0ST 'Westminster'. Step 3 - Chassis 1.

Before starting work on the chassis, some protection is needed for the fragile whistle on the cab roof. I learned the hard way from working on the Peckett 0-4-0STs that these break off with only the slightest touch. The locomotive will be inverted in a foam cradle for chassis painting, so a large lump of BluTack is used to prevent the whistle from touching the cradle.     To help with the application of paint to the coupling rods and motion I usually position the wheels so t

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Hornby Peckett 0-6-0ST 'Westminster'. Step 2 - Dullcote..

There will be some weathering powders (pigments) applied to 'Westminster'  at a later stage, so some preparation is being done to ensure that the particles stay put once applied. My preferred medium is Testor's Dullcote, so off we go. . . . . .    I'm protecting the underframe in this particular instance, mainly because the detail there will be highlighted using an airbrush and enamel paint, to which pigments 'stick' well enough without help. I've shown the components inside the spray

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Hornby Peckett 0-6-0ST 'Westminster'. Step 1 - Cleaning.

In order to establish just how much grease needed to be removed, the chassis keeper plate was unscrewed and the result was:     All this was tackled with a cocktail stick and some clean paper towels. Even though lots og grease was removed, there was still a plentiful layer left to lubricate all the moving parts. I thought I'd better check the top end of the transmission mechanism as well, and found this:       Back to work with the cocktail stick an

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Hornby Peckett 0-6-0ST 'Westminster'. Introduction.

The recent crop of Peckett locomotives from Hornby has lured me back into collecting habits. Temporarily!    Their reproduction of the Associated Portland Cement Manufacturers (APCM) locomotive, 'Westminster', which ended its days at Kidlington (Shipton-on-Cherwell) cement works (https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@51.8539534,-1.3086071,1896m/data=!3m1!1e3?hl=en), proved too much of a challenge for me and one was purchased specifically for the purpose of describing how it was to be weathere

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

A Few More Pecketts

One heavy and one light weathering exercise for each of Hornby's Peckett 0-6-0ST models.   Nothing more complicated than Railmatch Frame Dirt, Railmatch Weathered Black from the airbrush. Testor's Dullcote to prepare the upper parts for pigments, then Ammo Dark Earth and AK Interactive Black. Some Lifecolor Ash pigment and some Mig Productions Rubbel (sic) Dust for variety and some additional shading with MIG Productions Dark Wash. Oh, and some Gordon Edgar photographs for inspiration

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Hornby Peckett 0-6-0ST NCB Ryhope Colliery

While waiting for the Great Electric Train Show to open on Sunday morning, I visited Tony's Trains stand and relieved him of a Hornby Peckett. I went back 20 minutes later and complained about the condition of the box contents . . . . . . .    

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

PDK Maunsell L1 class 4-4-0 No. 1783. Step 9 - Finishing Touches.

To finish things off, some Black Smoke has been added to the wheel centres and the tender axleboxes and springs. I have also applied some Dark Mud to the seams in the tender, to indicate the start of rust, and some Rubbel Dust to the horizontal surfaces of some of the steps.   The requirement was for a very grubby workhorse, which might suggest that piles of paint and pigments are to be applied, but it is just as effective to apply small amounts of both to achieve the effect, adding mo

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

PDK Maunsell L1 class 4-4-0 No. 1783. Step 8 - Other Pigments.

More work with pigments now, to add to the random dirty bits that have been created with Black Smoke. I normally use MIG Productions Industrial City Dirt or Rubbel Dust (that's what it says on the jar) for lighter stains, like ash and sand, and Dark Mud and Track Brown for rusty bits. In this case it will be Rubbel Dust (ash and sand) and Dark Mud (rust).   The lighter colour represents ash staining under the smokebox door and sand staining around the sandbox fillers, and the darker co

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

PDK Maunsell L1 class 4-4-0 No. 1783. Step 7 - Black Pigment.

There are several areas on a steam locomotive where dirt buildup is of a very dark nature. The smokebox, the cab roof, the coal space, the running plate and so on. I like to represent this with a brushed pigment (in this case, MIG Productions Black Smoke) rather than with airbrushed paint. The pigment is applied with a filbert brush and is taken on the brush from the lid of the container, because there is (nearly) always a thin film there consisting of the finest particles.    

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

PDK Maunsell L1 class 4-4-0 No. 1783. Step 6 - Up Top.

The upper surfaces of this steam locomotive are shown with a heavy layer of soot-based grime. This is achieved by adding more weathered black to the mixture with frame dirt. If you look at the attached photograph you will see the difference between the wheels and the cab roof, for example, but I doubt (hope?) that you will see the join. By gradually changing the proportion of black and brown in the mixture, as work progresses upwards, the chance of 'tiger stripes' is significantly reduced.

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

PDK Maunsell L1 class 4-4-0 No. 1783. Step 5 - The Other Sides.

The next step was a repeat of the previous, really, but I have deliberately posted separately to illustrate the difference that one light coat can make once manipulated. The process is the same - a light airbrushed coat from one end of the locomotive to the other, followed by a vertical brushing with a dry flat shader. It is possible that the paint has dried too quickly for this to have an effect, so there is a process that can address that. The flat shader can be slightly dampened by adding a c

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

PDK Maunsell L1 class 4-4-0 No. 1783. Step 4 - The Sides.

The aibrush now turns to the sides of the locomotive and has been loaded with a mix of frame dirt and weathered black. The former is prominent - only a small amount of the latter has been added to the mix. A very light coat has been sprayed along the bodywork and immediately manipulated by brushing downwards with a dry 1/2" flat shader. The paint was drying fairly quickly and the use of a dry brush moved it downwards inconsistently. The result is a deliberately uneven layer of dirt.  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

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