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About this blog

A record of weathering work, intended to show both good and bad results, including explanations of what is used and how.

Entries in this blog

 

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 5 - Windows.

Even though the car is pretty grotty, I thought that the driver might make an effort to keep the windows clean. Clean white spirit has been used to remove the Dullcote layer. Soaking a cocktail stick (wooden variety) in the white spirit will allow a gentle rubbing action to gradually remove the dried Dullcote a little at a time, and if you don't go right into the corners it can leave an accumulation of 'dirt' there. The tiny flakes that will be left adhering to the plastic windows through static

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 4 - Pigment 2.

The second application of pigment is AK Interactive Dark Earth. This has been used to represent areas of bodywork where rust is only just starting to show through the paintwork, and also to impart a dusty appearance to the whole model. Note that it has been used on some of the chromed areas (bumpers and hubcaps) to give the impression of rust taking hold. Application was achieved with the filbert brush.      

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 4 - Pigment 1.

The Dullcote has presented a nice matt surface for the next stage - pigment application. The aim is to use two colours to represent various rust tones. Well, two, at least!   The first one is MIG Productions Track Brown, now marketed as Abteilung 502 Track Rust. It is used here to augment the rust spots by creating a larger rusty area with surface rust just starting.  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 3 - Removing the Shine.

The application of rusty areas is now finished. Some of the more obvious blobs of wash have been either removed or significantly diminished in appearance. Simple wiping with a damp (white spirit) rigger brush, holding the bristles as flat to the surface as possible, will achieve this. The model was left to dry for an hour or so (measured in coffee consumption at the rate of one every 30 minutes) and then given a generous coat of Testor's Dullcote from an aerosol can. This part of the process ach

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 2 - Rust Spots.

For some time now I have been meaning to have a go with a microbrush. I'm sure they've been on sale for years, and been used by thousands of modellers for all sorts of useful things, but I've never had a go. Until now. By applying a very small amount of wash from the tip of the rigger brush, I was able to just about colour the tiny bristles of the microbrush. The tip was then poked carefully at areas of the car where I thought rust would form. I have no photograph of a rusty SunbeamTalbot 90 to

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 1 - Wash.

This topic will use an AMMO by Mig wash, Africa Korps Wash A.MIG-1001. Why? Because I have some and it has a red tinge to it, which I thought would work on a green vehicle.   The jar needed a good shaking and mixing before being applied because the pigment had separated from the carrier and there was a ridge of hardened paint around the inside of the lid. I obviously didn't heed my own advice the last time I used it, and didn't clean the top and rim before replacing the lid.   Application wa

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. The Beginning and The End.

Another 1/43rd model, by Oxford Diecast.   Back in the days when cars were cars and boys were boys, I spent my time car spotting. Trains had no interest for me, where I lived they were all green and electric. One of the cars I drooled over was the Sunbeam Talbot 90, and when Oxford Diecast brought out their model of it in 7mm scale, I just had to have one.   This is what it looks like out of the box:     This is what it will look like at the end:  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Bachmann Air-Braked Vans - Summary.

And finally . . . .   Here's a photograph of the two vans together, so that you can see the similarities and differences between them.     Very little material has been used on both subjects but, nonetheless, the effects have produced vehicles that have been in use for some time and suffered the ravages of time and weather. Both would probably benefit from some more work on the roof, but that would merely be an additional thin coat or two of Dark Wash, left to dry and then rubbed with a s

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Bachmann VAA (Maroon) 200119. Step 5 - Pigment 2.

On this vehicle I have used a black pigment to replicate the dark colours seen underneath door handle areas. Once again, only a very small quantity was used on the filbert brush and worked into place by gentle 'scrubbing'. A small touch was added to the buffer beam area as well, which can just be seen in this photograph. It wasn't until I'd taken the photograph that I noticed one of the buffers was trying to break free from its housing.  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Bachmann VAA (Maroon) 200119. Step 4 - Pigment 1.

The underframe and lower bodyside edges are now attacked with Dark Earth pigment. Once again, only very small amounts are loaded onto the brush (a filbert) and dabbed in place, followed by a generous redistribution in the direction of dirt 'flow'. By using small amounts the effect can be controlled quite nicely, resulting in discolouration rather than in-your-face stains. The edges of the Dark Earth areas are then supplemented with Rubble, to ease the transition from heavy to light discolouratio

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Bachmann VAA (Maroon) 200119. Step 3 - Capillary Work.

Out with the rigger brush, white spirit and Dark Wash. As previously described (if you've been following closely) the thinned wash is applied via a rigger brush to panel edges, corners and other detail to highlight it and create dirty shadows. Wherever dirt would build up on the real vehicle it can be replicated by adding a small amount of thinned wash, remembering that it will dry lighter by a couple of shades than it appears when first applied.  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Bachmann VAA (Maroon) 200119. Step 2 - Dirtying.

Now it's the turn of the MIG Dark Wash, used in the airbrush without any thinners, but at 25psi. Once again, a thin coat, and then worked downwards immediately with a dry 1/2" flat shader brush. This will leave an accumulation of 'dirt' just above all of the horizontal ridges and tone down the previously applied ComArt Light Dust. If necessary, the downward movement can be applied several times to achieve the required result.     No attempt was made to mask underframe or roof, allowing the

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Bachmann VAA (Maroon) 200119. Step 1 - Fading.

The ComArt paint is advertised as airbrush ready, but I've still thinned it down a little with a few drops of acrylic thinner from Ultimate. This product is usable with all acrylic paints including Tamiya. Applied from an Iwata Eclipse CS airbrush set to 20 psi, putting 3 very fine coats on and not bothering to wait between coats because it dries so fast. If you look closely at the finish, it's very grainy, but that will not be a problem because there is much more work to be done, which will dis

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Bachmann VAA (Maroon) 200119. Introduction.

Similar vehicle in that it is a van. Otherwise it has a different body, different chassis, different livery and different payload!   This time the fading will be done first, using ComArt Light Dust, and then the dirtying will start.     The only work done on the model from the box is the removal of the couplings.

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Bachmann COV AB / VDA van. A Change of Plan.

Having been shown the error of my ways by not fading the van before starting, I shall be embarking on another project where I do fade first. This project was completed as an exercise in using the MIG Dark Wash in all sorts of ways to represent a grimy COV AB.     The roof has been airbrushed with slightly thinned wash, applied as four thin coats and left to dry between each coat. This resulted in a very soft texture that was easily but not completely removed, leaving a slight brownish disco

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Bachmann COV AB / VDA van. Step 1. A Thin Wash.

The previously illustrated MIG Dark Wash has been applied from an airbrush as three VERY thin coats. This was achieved by thinning the already thin wash with white spirit and spraying from about 20cm away. The discolouration achieved each time was barely visible, but you should be able to see from this photograph that the wash has collected on the edges of moulded detail in much the same way as dirt would fall on the real thing.  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Bachmann COV AB / VDA van. Preparation.

The plan is to use a dark wash and a couple of pigments to replicate as much of the dirt as possible that can be seen in the photograph. There may need to be some additions as I progress, but they will be identified as and when appropriate.      

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Bachmann COV AB / VDA van. Introduction.

The subject has been chosen and a colour photograph found to work from. Bachmann produced several livery versions of the 29 ton sliding door box van (COV AB, later VDA )and this one (38-141) is in Railfreight livery, numbered 200077. Paul Bartlett has many photographs of these on his website, and has given his permission for this photograph to be used in this blog.     The challenges are: Fade the reddish shade of brown to show age and wear Highlight areas of accumulated dirt Represe

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

December - a statement of intent . . . . . . .

Modelling commitments for December are minimal (a bit of planning was involved), so there should be plenty of time to work on another subject. He said, confidently.   One suggestion received involved a modern image van, VDA or similar, so I've found one in a box and will now look out for some suitable photographs to work from. There will be hundreds, if not thousands, on the Internet for me to investigate, so I'll just have to knuckle down and get to work on the keyboard.   Just to add a lit

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 9. Summary.

That's all I plan to do with this subject, remembering that it was an exercise in weathering for as little cost as possible/practical.   I have attempted to clear an area of windscreen where the wiper would have cleaned, but on reflection (!) that was not such a good idea. The wheels were only made muddy on one side.     Just for comparison, the topic started here:   http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/blog/2349/entry-21469-a-land-rover-series-1-109-introduction/

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 8. Wheels again.

The front wheel and wheel arch have been further treated to show the effects of recently collected mud. In the case of the wheel hub, a dry brush was used to pick off some of the white spirit-infused pigment before the mixture had dried. This excess was wiped off on a paper towel, and the remaining trace of pigment on the brush tip just gently touched onto the wing surface, leaving a trace of discolouration thereon. The rubbed appearance on the tyre sidewall was done by rubbing the thin layer of

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 7. Windows.

The glazing is currently covered in a coat of Dullcote, so the driver and any passengers who might be present will have difficulty seeing where they are going. Not to worry, the trusty cocktail stick is close by. A wooden cocktail stick will absorb white spirit, and white spirit can be used to remove even hardened Dullcote from glazing without doing any damage. As long as the cocktail stick is gently rubbed against the glazing using the side of the tip rather than the point of the tip, a clear

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 6. Muddy wheels.

In 7mm scale and larger, it is quite reasonable to use pigments to add texture without the look achieved being overdone. In the case of our Land Rover, pigment can be used to replicate accumulated mud on the wheels. A generous (for a change) amount of pigment is collected from the pot and deposited on the wheel hub, having supported the model on its side (hence the strange viewing angle).     When happy with the general arrangement of the pigment pile, a drop of white spirit is added to the

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 5. Pigment.

The key to successful appearance when using pigments is to apply small quantities at a time. This approach allows the gradual build-up of colour and texture, so that the subject is not overwhelmed. My technique involves the following steps: Make sure that the lid of the container is properly screwed on Give the container a brief shake Tap the container firmly on the work surface Open the container and inspect the inside of the lid/cap, where you should see a thin film of pigment Pick u

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

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