Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/05/11 in all areas

  1. I bloody love these water mixable oil paints that I've been using! I thought gouache was the wonder stuff, well it still is really, but these oils are even better and much more versatile. It's taken a while to figure out how to use them effectively, it requires a slightly different technique to gouache, but I'm now glad that I've persevered with them after the initial disappointment that I had. I've used them quite successfully, I think, on a couple of the TTA wagons that have graced the bench of late. Exhibit A: The inspiration: http://paulbartlett....b08c1#h303b08c1 The model: Before: After: Pretty much all of the barrel weathering, with the exception of the streaking from the filling hatch, has been done with the oils on this one. The streaking is gouache, which is still the best method of achieving this kind of effect. The underframe is a mix of the oils and powder/hairspray, with additional powder used dry on top for variation. The powder/hairspray mix was usd on all the black bits of the underframe, with highlights and other colours added as required. The oils are great for adding subtle variation of colour, as they can be added sparingly and spread around, quite a long way, using a stiff-ish flat brush. They do dry pretty permanently, unlike gouache, after a period of time but the finish is still relatively fragile. They need to be sealed with varnish if the models that they're used on are going to handled regularly. They can also be used in wash form, with either white spirit, or water with a drop of screenwash in the case of these particular paints. They can also be used in a form of dry brushing to add very subtle highlights. Exhibit B: The inspiration: http://paulbartlett....17179#h2d017179 The model: Before: After: Again, the barrel weathering is exclusively oils, including the spillage stains. So far, I've not found anything quite as good for doing subtle weathering as these, especially with the ability to add extremely subtle variations in colour. The oils aren't as opaque as gouache, so they're no use for the heavier effects, for example I tried them on the truly filthy ex Esso tanker, as seen a few posts ago, and the oils wouldn't cover the original livery, even brushed on neat. I ended up using the gouache for that particular model, which reminds me that I must finish the other side of it! This is probably going to sound a bit pretentious, but I think these materials allow the boundary between modelling and art to be blurred a bit. To explain, part of producing a painting of a wagon would be adding the highlights, shadows and other subtle variations to bring the subject to life. In a way, weathering a model of wagon works the same way, except that the wagon itself is the canvas, if you see what I mean. I am definitely no artist, but am using these paints in almost the same way as one would, I guess. Still, whichever way you look at it, I'm pleased with the results so far, and look forward to seeing what else I can do with this stuff. More soon!
    5 points
  2. After purchasing an Oxford VW Golf Gti at the York show over Easter weekend, I thought that I would modify it a little into one which has been 'improved' by its owner. The first task was to dismantle the car, which was very easy thanks to the two screws, front and rear. Once I was inseide, work could begin. The first modifications were to the chassis. The hubcaps were drilled out to represent alloy wheels, and a small slice of plastic rod for the centre-nut. The moulded exhaust pipe was cut and filed away, and a new one fabricated from a spare missile from an aircraft kit (should go like a rocket!). The centre was drilled out for added effect. The interior mouding was given a splash of colour, and the glazing was given a wash of Tamiya Smoke acrylic on the side windows for a slightly 'tinted' effect. Bodywise, some thin plasticard was used to create an 'air-scoop' on the bonnet and a spoiler on the rear. The bonnet was given a coat of black to give it a more sporty look, and the spoilergiven a coat of red to blend it in a little (but not too much, as the owner isn't too careful with his colour choices!) Just a quick mdoification (under 2 hours) to add a touch of difference to the excellent range of scale motor vehicles available. Any questions, comments or thoughts, as always are welcomed! J
    2 points
  3. Yeah, that would help, wouldn't it! I'm using the Winsor and Newton Artisan range, which, as far as I know, are the only ones on the market. I got mine here: http://www.artsupplies.co.uk/ for great prices and great service. The paints themselves aren't cheap, but they'll last virtually forever, a little goes a very long way indeed. I'll edit the post with some pics of the unsullied tanks shortly. Bryn - You're too kind :blush_mini: I'll be interested to see how you get on, I take it you'll be tapping Pixie up for discount supplies... Jon - The black ones are a different kettle of fish, with the dirt slightly less noticeable. I liked what you've done with yours (gave you a +1 for them )
    2 points
  4. OK, so I was in Mevagissey last week, so HAD to call at the World of Model Railways with #2 son for an hour or two. Some Spingside BR Head and tail lamps just jumped off the rack at me Group 4 for the interested - Well, it is a mixed traffic engine B) Gives you a good look at the other details added from the Brit detailing pack too
    1 point
  5. Bachmann A2 – correcting the downward slope of the rear running plate/cab With my analysis winging its way to Bachmann, I am posting it here! ****NOTE – this advice is offered in good faith – I will not promise that it will work in all cases and modelling skills, and take no responsibility for loss or damage (to person, limb, model or model value!) that may result. Some measurements (including thickness of plasticard, and amount of material removed) may require amendment for your particular model, and trial and error may be involved.**** *** NOTE 2 – read ALL these instructions through before starting, DO NOT START work unless you are happy you can complete it, including some awkward reassembly. *** NOTE 3 – some of the screws joining parts of the body can be VERY tight. Be careful not to strip the screw heads (I nearly did!) Good Luck! G-BOAF What you will need: Screwdrivers, knife, small metal file, 0.25mm plasticard (or similar for packing) screwdriver (Philips No.0 seems to work well for backhead screws, and a number 1 (I think, for other screws) Step 1. Take off body. Drawbar will drop out. Then, undo all 6 boiler/cab screws (two under backhead, two under firebox, one under boiler barrel (the rearward one of the two in this location), and the one under the smokebox. Keep note of what goes where, they are all different sizes! Step 2. Remove backhead by gently pushing it backwards from inside the firebox. Fall plate will drop out. Step 3. Gently remove boiler from running plate. It may require ‘rocking’ gently side to side off the running plate. Smokebox steam pipes may well drop off at this point. Keep them safe. Step 4. Gently break off cab from boiler, Cab will be glued to boiler. Holding the cab roof with finger and thumb inside and outside. towards the front, gently lever thee cab upwards to break it off. Step 5. Scrape off all the remaining glue on cab front, and on the rear of the firebox/lip. The area will be hidden on reassembly, but take your time, do not rush or risk damage to paint in and around this area (esp at the top of the cab front).. Step 6. On the running plate casting, file off about 0.5mm of material from the V-front of the raised section of casting to which cab/backhead are secured. The outer-bottom part of this area may be difficult to do without damaging the running plate/rivet detail, but go as far as you can.... And then work on the inside bottom of the Cab V-front to scrape off a corresponding amount of material to compensate for any metal that could not be removed. Also extend forward the depth of the ‘slots’ in the cab moulding which the backhead screws pass through – if left they will restrict movement. The aim is that when the cab it put back, it has about 0.5mm fore/aft play to absorb any irrigularities without bending the running plate. You Step 7 Backhead – file down the tops of the gauges/valve mounts that sit atop the backhead. The valve handles themselves should be left, but be careful not to damage them, and beware, they can fall out without warning, so watch out! When you hold the backhead, be careful of the injector valve handles – do not put pressure on them! Step 8 File down a fair amount (at least 0.5mm, but I didn’t actually measure it – could be a bit more) of material off the FRONT EDGE (i.e. the edge that contacts the front of the cab) This ensures that the backhead won’t push outwards when everything is screwed up again! Depending on how ‘thick’ the cab front is, will depend on how much material to remove. Ensure that the front of the backhead NO LONGER makes contact with the front of the cab. Step 8a file the front corners of the backhead casting, again to prevent any contact with cab corners. Step 9 Replace boiler ONLY and loosely do up screws such that the boiler is still loose on the running plate. Step 9A Getting the outside steam pipes to relocate in the smokebox/running plate is DIFFICULT, not least because they are partly behind the smoke deflectors! I found that, with the boiler loosely in position, but not rammed home, holding the steam pipes with blu-tak, locating them in the holes in the running plate, line the tip pip up with the hole in the smokebox, then push the boiler/smokebox home. Time and persistence required – it took me 15 mins at least (once I knew what I was doing! You might want to wait until you are satisfied the job is correct, then re-strip everything (or at least loosen everything up) and re-insert the steam pipes. Alternatively, glue them to the smokebox, but possibly do this BEFORE you do any dismantling, since getting their position correct without them being secured at both ends may be difficult. I haven’t tried this, so can’t advise. Step 10. Before doing up firebox screws fully, squeeze the running plate section under the firebox against the firebox botttom, to minimise this gap, don’t go mad, and make sure you are pushing the running plate by the material under the rear of the firebox, NOT the plate under the cab, since this may bend other areas of the casting. Once done, tighten boiler screws. Step 11. Cut two small 0.25 mm plasticard ‘washers’, and place over rear chassis/body screw holes. There should already be 0.5mm of clear plastic packing glued on the lugs on the running plate casting. Step 12. Place body (still minus the cab and backhead) onto chassis, complete with the additional rear washers. If the rear running plate is not straight, ‘Squeeze’ the firebox and chassis together pushing down on the firebox top, effectively gently bending the rear running plate upwards slightly. You may want to put some 0.5mm plasticard packing between the cartazzi (towards its front) and running plate to prevent going too far the other way! Be gentle. Metal is slightly springing. Repeat with varying pressure until sloop goes. Check with ruler on flat surface that running plate is now level. Also check that the main running plate is level, excluding any irregularities it may have (either use a ruler, or callipers if you desire +/- 0/01mm accuracy!!! Step 13 With loco on surface, the height of cab running plate should be identical to the top of the front buffer beam running plate. This SHOULD roughly match the height of the tender running plate Step 13a Ensure the tender body is level– there may be some moulding pin protrusions under the rear of the tender body which may push that up! – thanks to 34theletterbetweenB&D for that on the A1 thread!. Step 14 There will now be a slight gap between the Cartazzi and the cab running plate. This should only be noticable from very low angels, and can be filled with plasticard or other appropriate material at a later date if desired. Step 15 Replace cab, and before fitting the backhead, check that it has a little bit of fore/aft play when it sites squarely on the running plate, if it doesn’t, repeat steps 5 and 6 until this is achieved. Step 16 Replace backhead – it should slip into cab without too much force – if noticeable resistance is encountered, repeat step 7. Step 17. Screw up backhead – gently tighten screws, but don’t go mad. If gap between running plate and firebox reappears, repeat Steps 8 and 8a and bend back the running plate (steps 10 and 12). If OK, loosen backhead screws, slot in fall plate and re-tighten (also put in steam pipes if you didn’t do this earlier) Step 18. Replace body on chassis, slot in draw bar, and do up three body screws, starting with the front one. The left hand rear screw (on the right when loco upside down).might be advised to only be finger tight. I say this since it appears the cartazzi section of the chassis casting is slightly lower on the left hand side than the right (very strange, but the ruler says so, and running plate corner got pulled down when tightened fully!). More packing might do this, but I haven’t been able to work out how much – any helpers???. Step 19. Check everything is level to your satisfaction. There is probably a bit of trial and error involved in the whole thing, I have repeated Step 7 a few times (there was a slight irregularity in my filing the first and second times, resulting in a slight sloop remaining)! There will be a slight gap between the V-front of the cab, and the firebox, this is due to the excess thickness at the top of the cab!. All in all, a couple of hours work (once you know what you are doing – it took me at least double that!), with a further hour tweaking (depending on how many decimal places of a millimeter you are worried about!). I also cleaned out some flash on chassis block under cylinder moulding and the motion bracket, as well as on the chassis block between the cylinder and gear train. The body was leaning slightly due to this flash. Note – pics below taken at interim phase, before work on cab and backhead, but show level running plate (I think I was experimenting with 0.5mm spacers at this point – too high!) I have never had an RTR loco where so much work has been required on a loco straight out of the box to get it to what I would imagine were the original design specifications (i.e. level and straight – I can’t imagine sloop on the CAD drawing!). Much more work than the 8750 pannier (step-by-step to come on straightening out the running plate on ALL (or nearly all?) examples (8750 only not 57XX)! Following photo taken at interim stage, with 0.5mm packing (rather than 0.25mm), and no backhead. The finished result is correctly alligned with the tender.
    1 point
  6. Hi All Since building the circuit of track and starting running trains I have had problems with derailments. Upon careful examination of the track I discovered that the alighnment of track section joints was not as good as I thought. By running a train around, whist running in the locomotive I found that it derailed at a point, I then carefully examined the track near the site. I found that small blobs of solder on the inside of the rails, this is much more critical when the track radius is sub 600mm radius. These blobs were removed by applying the soldering iron to the outside of the rail, and then by using a solder sucker to the inside of the rail when the solder was molten. The process of finding small problems with track and the rectifying them is called fettling. I also had problems with electrical pickup on the aluminium allow runners of the removable cassette. When I closely examined the inside edge, I found that there was a bur. The locomotive wheel was only in contact with a strip less that 0,2mm wide. This problem was rectified by using a needle file to remove the bur and apply a small radius to the edge of the aluminium section. The above processes took several hours but the time was very well spent as I can run a train around the circuit for one hour without any derailments, even on the very tight curves into the cassette fiddletyard. This has allowed me to run in the new 04 locomotive prior to insulating the DDC decoder. This is essential as doing so will invalidate the Farish warranty as the installation required that the locomotive is modified. Lisa
    1 point
  7. Similar idea to the previous, this also fits the 10ft chassis 1.tiff
    1 point
  8. The coaches behind the diesel were the ones that there were HO brass kits of.
    1 point
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?
    Sign Up
×
×
  • Create New...