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RogerTE

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  1. In the eighties I worked at the Research Centre at Northwick Park so I used to spend a lot of time at Puffers (Chris Parrish who could be really friendly or really grumpy, Dave King and John Redrupp) or sometimes Harrow Model Shop, but until they started doing the Underground models I never found it that interesting. However I also spent a lot of time doing work at Watford General Hospital, so during lunch time wandered to the town centre via Vicarage Road Precinct. In the precinct was one of the original discounters, who used to advertise in the likes of the "Constructor", but I can't think of the name. [edit: have just remembered it was called RailMail full of boxes of Hornby, Lima, Airfix and Mainline] Previous posters have mentioned Kings Cross. I used to do some work in conjunction with hospitals in that area, so often traveled up to that station, and used it as an excuse to pay a visit to Kings Cross/Eames. it was noticeable that you were often approached by the ladies of the area when walking to the shop, but they ignored you if you were carrying one of their plastic bags. Not sure whether it was because they thought you had spent all your money, or because you were a railway modeller youhad no interest in what they had to offer
  2. The GS body kit advert (which was in MRC at the time) said that Roxey Mouldings was to produce a chassis kit. So thought I'd wait until that was available, as at that time I was new to modelling. After a while I got round to asking Dave when the chassis would be available, and he said that was the first he had heard of it. So never got round to buying the body kit.
  3. Hi, My late father used to drive F class locos for London Transport. He always referred to them as "the big engines" and the E class as the "little engines". When I was little he took me into Neasden (it was the late 1950s, can't imagine that happening nowadays!), and I couldn't see the difference. He pointed out the wheel arrangement, but as far as I remember body wise the only real difference was the F class had a bigger bunker, and seem to remember it stood higher - but I was only 9 at the time!, There used to be a F class body shell kit available way back - GS models. I think it was RThompson of RT Models under a different guise but could be wrong. SE Finescale also produce a kit, and as far as I can see the only real difference is the bunker - but don't know where they got the details from. Jim Snowdon managed to "liberate" many of the old Met/LT drawings - which is how his Met Rolling Stock book came about. I wonder if he can help? <edit> Have just phoned someone who should know (used to work with my father), and he has confirmed what I thought - they were identical except for bunkers, wheel arrangement and steam heating (F class wasn't used for passenger stock work - although he understood they were substituted for E class on occasions during WW2. Forgot to mention I answered a similar question on another thread: The F class, although very similar to the E, was in fact nearly 1ft longer (my dad who used to drive F class locos for LT, used to call them the "big engines" when comparing them to the E class - I won't say what he called the panniers when they arrived ). I think the difference might be because the F class had a larger coal bunker. However the boilers and cylinders were the same as the later E class (the earlier E class cylinders were 0.5 in smaller than the later ones - definitely won't be noticeable in 2mm scale!). Some basic dimensions: Overall Length 33ft (over buffers) Footplate width 8ft 5in Driving wheels 5ft 6in (wheelbase 7ft 5in) Bogie wheels 3ft 9.5 inch
  4. Wow G and H classes - just what I need for my P4 layout. I am in the strange position of having the wheels already (from the old Mike Sharman range) so over the next 4 months when I am at home, self-isolating, will have to start on the chassis. (Once I can persuade the other half I really need the bodies )
  5. The best source is the Jim Snowdon book (Wild Swan), as jim had access to most of the Met/LT drawings when he was preparing it. So how about the Rothschild saloon and Pullmans? (then of course there's the non-passenger stock...)
  6. As a website builder I agree that the website is like something from the dark ages (of t'Intenet), but I have no problem opening it in any of the browsers installed on my laptop (Firefox, Opera, Edge, IE and Chrome). All are the latest versions, I never use a phone for Internet use, so can't comment on those. I think the problem might be a Chrome one as they are being very proactive in trying to block websites that don't have a security certificate attached (i.e. full address begins https://.... not http://...) It wouldn't take too long to rebuild that site as a modern, responsive, site using any online site builder.
  7. Apologies - forgot I'd lent the copy to a friend. He'll be returning it later this week, and I'll send you a PDF then. Roger
  8. The Loco Profile booklet was only the A/B class - sorry had a bit of a brain fade. The F class, although very similar to the E, was in fact nearly 1ft longer (my dad who used to drive F class locos for LT, used to call them the "big engines" when comparing them to the E class - I won't say what he called the panniers when they arrived :) ). I think the difference might be because the F class had a larger coal bunker. However the boilers and cylinders were the same as the later E class (the earlier E class cylinders were 0.5 in smaller than the later ones - definitely won't be noticeable in 2mm scale!). Some basic dimensions: Overall Length 33ft (over buffers) Footplate width 8ft 5in Driving wheels 5ft 6in (wheelbase 7ft 5in) Bogie wheels 3ft 9.5 inch I have had a quick check, and reckon that the drawing of the E class in the article about Met liveries that was in BRM Jan 1998 is pretty well spot-on. , and you should be able to scale most dimensions from it. If you want I will copy the loco image as a PDF
  9. If you can find it there was a Met locos issue of Locomotives Illustrated - I think it was 65, which has loads of views, but can't remember if they had dimensions. Loco Profile No 10 had the details of most Met tanks. Unfortunately my copy was "borrowed" by someone, and never got returned. I wouldn't be surprised if Jim Snowdon has details of them - he managed to rescue lots of ex-Met drawings. Also how about trying Quainton as Met 1 was/is based there, and I daresay they have detailed it. Final thought - try Wills Finecast. They produce a nice 4mm E class model, so have probably got all the dimensions.
  10. Although it would be a departure from Hornby's normal "sphere of influence" Heljan have shown there is enough interest in a certain London-based railway and there are 2 steam locos that are available for scanning, as well as several items of coaching stock..
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