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BobM

'Cambrian Street'

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No Bob.

I mean that the lightest colour is to be the final colour you dry brush on at the end. You make your two or three contrasting shades by adding a darker colour to the lightest base colour in your palette. Remember what I said about you can't make a dark colour lighter by adding a lighter shade to it. You can only make a light colour darker. Your base colour should be the lightest colour you intend to use and you make it darker by adding a darker shade to it. You paint the contrasting darker shades first and then the base colour over the top of it all. So if you are using 3 shades then you take the lightest colour as the bulk and add a darker shade to give the middle contrast and then add more of the darker shade to make it even darker as the darkest contrast, that way you are adding dark to light all the time. Then you go over the whole thing with the light base colour. The end effect is that the light colour is the general colour with the darker contrasting shades showing through. One of the biggest problems you have is that you have too much paint on the brush when you dry brush. You build up the dry brush colour by going over it again and again in many layers.  Dip the brush and wipe almost all of it off in a tissue before you go anywhere near the piece you're working on and use an old scabby brush that you wouldn't dream of painting anything you want a nice paint finish on.

Regards Lez.

P.S. Did you get that paint chart I sent you mate?  

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12 hours ago, lezz01 said:

No Bob.

I mean that the lightest colour is to be the final colour you dry brush on at the end. You make your two or three contrasting shades by adding a darker colour to the lightest base colour in your palette. Remember what I said about you can't make a dark colour lighter by adding a lighter shade to it. You can only make a light colour darker. Your base colour should be the lightest colour you intend to use and you make it darker by adding a darker shade to it. You paint the contrasting darker shades first and then the base colour over the top of it all. So if you are using 3 shades then you take the lightest colour as the bulk and add a darker shade to give the middle contrast and then add more of the darker shade to make it even darker as the darkest contrast, that way you are adding dark to light all the time. Then you go over the whole thing with the light base colour. The end effect is that the light colour is the general colour with the darker contrasting shades showing through. One of the biggest problems you have is that you have too much paint on the brush when you dry brush. You build up the dry brush colour by going over it again and again in many layers.  Dip the brush and wipe almost all of it off in a tissue before you go anywhere near the piece you're working on and use an old scabby brush that you wouldn't dream of painting anything you want a nice paint finish on.

Regards Lez.

P.S. Did you get that paint chart I sent you mate?  

 

Cheers Lez....

Thank you yes, (thought I'd sent you an email ?),  very useful indeed and thank you for the advice here, I will have a session soon on the platform surface....

Hope the 'London Heat Island' isn't too intense?

 

Regards always...

Bob

Edited by BobM

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Hi Bob.

Yes mate I just saw the email. My bad I tend to use this platform for communicating with my modeling friends and only use email for transferring files.

The weather here is unbearable. 33+ everyday without a break is just about killing me. It has made making any progress on the new pond almost impossible. My outdoor space is a very intense sun trap and can see temps in excess of 40 deg even though I have a large parasol and a shade sail. It is also quite small and moving things around to give me workspace is always a problem. My workshop is just an oven right now. I was trying to work on a spray bar yesterday and all I could do was cut a piece off the pipe to connect the flexible hose via an elbow. I couldn't even begin drilling the pipe or even tighten up the compression fittings. We aren't getting much sleep either so it becomes very wearing after a few days. It's supposed to break towards the weekend when I plan to do the change over to the new pond but I can't get a start on the new structure at all so I might be trying to do it all on one day which isn't ideal. I've already had one episode of heatstroke last week and I really don't fancy another one. It's also playing havoc with my plants and I've lost many to the heat even with daily watering. That's the price you pay when everything is in planters I guess.

Regards Lez.          

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1 hour ago, lezz01 said:

Hi Bob.

Yes mate I just saw the email. My bad I tend to use this platform for communicating with my modeling friends and only use email for transferring files.

The weather here is unbearable. 33+ everyday without a break is just about killing me. It has made making any progress on the new pond almost impossible. My outdoor space is a very intense sun trap and can see temps in excess of 40 deg even though I have a large parasol and a shade sail. It is also quite small and moving things around to give me workspace is always a problem. My workshop is just an oven right now. I was trying to work on a spray bar yesterday and all I could do was cut a piece off the pipe to connect the flexible hose via an elbow. I couldn't even begin drilling the pipe or even tighten up the compression fittings. We aren't getting much sleep either so it becomes very wearing after a few days. It's supposed to break towards the weekend when I plan to do the change over to the new pond but I can't get a start on the new structure at all so I might be trying to do it all on one day which isn't ideal. I've already had one episode of heatstroke last week and I really don't fancy another one. It's also playing havoc with my plants and I've lost many to the heat even with daily watering. That's the price you pay when everything is in planters I guess.

Regards Lez.          

 

Hi...

Hopefully yes, it'll be fresher by late weekend, it's constant watering here at the nursery to keep the stock hydrated on the sales areas, the main drawback though is that folks can always you, the hose pipe akin to Ariadne's thread, but in reverse!

 

Take care

Bob

 

Edited by BobM

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Hi All....

It is amazing really how I made the errors on the platform colour in the first place, considering the amount of paving slabs laid both here at the nursery and at Arley, I see them virtually every day and evidently they're not even remotely close to the 'grey' tones I have used......closer to a pale light stone! and still I made the mistakes!  :scratchhead:

 

I'd wear a hair shirt if wasn't so warm!

 

Will let you know how I progress for sure...

Keep cool....

Regards always

Bob

Edited by BobM
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2 hours ago, BobM said:

It is amazing really how I made the errors on the platform colour in the first place, considering the amount of paving slabs laid both here at the nursery and at Arley, I see them virtually every day and evidently they're not even remotely close to the 'grey' tones I have used......closer to a pale light stone! and still I made the mistakes!  

 

It's a lesson I keep having to relearn, so don't be too hard on yourself. You cannot transfer the colours you see on 1:1 stuff to models, it just doesn't work, particularly for stone and brick and things l ike that.

 

The human brain and eye compensate for distance in a way that makes colours change, and the consequence is that for a model you need to capture what it would look like at a distance, not close up.

 

As an example, I recently built some model drystone walling and wanted to paint it to appear as limestone. I took some photos of the real thing to work from:

 

ladmanlow158.jpg.0fe73eb2b5dcee8d9eb0b82cd6c3efd8.jpg

 

So you look at that, and you can see a whole range of grey shades (more than 50) from dark grey to white, and some buff and brown colours as well.

 

However, the same bit of wall from 10 feet away looks like this:

 

ladmanlow160.jpg.29d802a32c40575f50f6be732deb3d34.jpg

 

The whole thing looks darker, and you lose the many lighter shades and it becomes more homogenised apart from the odd bright white bit.

 

So when painting, I used the darker greys, with the odd highlight, and the result is passable:

 

ladmanlow1163.jpg.13e06a38084d08a12dd35ee19e8e2ca7.jpg

 

Cheers,

 

Al.

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Try these colours Bob. You don't need to go out and get them if you don't have them, you can mix them yourself now you have the chart. 121 pale stone as your base colour, 72 khaki drill as your dark tone and 94 brown yellow for your mid tone. As you can see from the chart they are very close to each other and can be mixed by adding 29 dark earth or 26 khaki to 34 white. I suggest that you write down every colour you mix in a notebook.

Like this:

Platform surface.

Base = 4 parts 34 white/1 part 29 dark earth.

Mid tone = 2 parts 34 white/1 part 29 dark earth.

Dark tone = 4 parts 34 white/3 parts 29 dark earth. 

This is just an example you understand you'll have to figure out the actual proportions for yourself.

The reason for the colour "recipe book" is so you can refer back to it at a later date to get an exact match should you need to.

Regards Lez.    

Edited by lezz01
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11 hours ago, lezz01 said:

Try these colours Bob. You don't need to go out and get them if you don't have them, you can mix them yourself now you have the chart. 121 pale stone as your base colour, 72 khaki drill as your dark tone and 94 brown yellow for your mid tone. As you can see from the chart they are very close to each other and can be mixed by adding 29 dark earth or 26 khaki to 34 white. I suggest that you write down every colour you mix in a notebook.

Like this:

Platform surface.

Base = 4 parts 34 white/1 part 29 dark earth.

Mid tone = 2 parts 34 white/1 part 29 dark earth.

Dark tone = 4 parts 34 white/3 parts 29 dark earth. 

This is just an example you understand you'll have to figure out the actual proportions for yourself.

The reason for the colour "recipe book" is so you can refer back to it at a later date to get an exact match should you need to.

Regards Lez.    

 

Thanks Lez....

I am going to brave the thunderstorms  which are already rumbling around now and take a walk to the local model shop as I need a few brushes....the tricky bit will be waking through the woods, hope I don't get struck by lightning!

Regards always,

Bob

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Evening All.....

Hope everyone is well....?

 

While awaiting the courage to begin painting the slabs on the main platform, have made steps towards 'ashing' the upper section, using a mix of baked silver sand and Arley loco yard ash.....

Started by applying a thin layer of pva and then liberally sprinkling the mixture onto the surface......may require a light dusting of ark Arley ash to finish or a wash of thinned dark earth to colour...?

The mixture here has darkened as it soaked into the pva but has a tendency to lighten as it dries I've found...?

   IMG_0090.JPG.e6a68ece419f9594e78b4d659fc4ee34.JPG IMG_0092.JPG.13a51115f18242a3d7c480e457e47018.JPG   IMG_0093.JPG.0cff737afaa67d59638bf85224a021ab.JPG

 

Regards always....

Bob

 

 

Edited by BobM
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Try a thin wash of 2 parts 29 to 1 part 33 and thin it to a 1 to 1 ratio with thinners Bob.

It is a little light I grant you but it's still looking very nice mate.

Regards Lez.

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Hi All.....

Having seen that the base mix was indeed too light in 'this morning's light', decided rather than colour this with wash's would use a similar method utilised on the coal and goods yard area....so started by adding a dark thin layer of loco ash and have then started to add in further lighter ash to highlight.....

will keep you posted.....any comments greatly appreciated....on whether it's improvement on the light colour and becoming  a fairer representation of ash?

 

IMG_0097.JPG.d586f493fa7c1a62793aa307337cada4.JPG

 

Regards always 

Bob

Edited by BobM
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It's looking pretty good to me Bob. I'm not sure that you need to go any further with it mate.

Regards Lez.  

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8 hours ago, lezz01 said:

It's looking pretty good to me Bob. I'm not sure that you need to go any further with it mate.

Regards Lez.  

 

Hi...

I have had a look at the section this morning now that it is fully dry, and no it seems fine to me too. so save for a light sanding down to remove the 'nobbly' bits it should be okay.....will let you all know.

Have a great weekend....

 

Regards always....

 

Bob

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