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Which brings me to her forebears.  One built the Bodmin & Wadebridge

That's a line definitely worth modelling. With several people on RMweb building layouts of, or based on, the boring modern Bodmin, and a 2mm one of the equally modern and dull Wadebridge, I think someone needs to do it.

Edited by BG John
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"I feel there is much, much more I want to know about the railways of German East Africa."

 

Well, they were thin on the ground.

 

Here is the list from the German Wikipedia page:

 

Lukoledi-Tal-Bahn (Kleinbahn)

Ruandabahn (nicht realisiert)

Sigi-Bahn (Kleinbahn)

Ostafrikanische Zentralbahn

Usambarabahn

Verbindungsbahn Mombo-Handeni (Heeresfeldbahn)

 

So, two main railways, one in the north, one intended to run from the coast, across the centre of the country to lake tanganjika, both unfinished at the outbreak of WW1, two short narrow gauge feeders, one army field railway (this one I will delve into further!) and a lot of drawings for a railway into The Ruanda province (which wasn't quite the same as Rwanda as it exists now; it was roughly Rwanda + Burundi).

 

If you want to go deeper, the book below is currently for sale for E24, and the same stockist has further words from our friend Lettow-Vorbeck, "What the English taught me about East Africa". Sounds intriguing!

 

With a legal hat on, you may wish to peruse this copy of the concession for the construction and operation of the central railway, which looks suitably long and tedious https://de.m.wikisource.org/wiki/Gesetz,_betreffend_die_Übernahme_einer_Garantie_des_Reichs_in_bezug_auf_eine_Eisenbahn_von_Daressalam_nach_Mrogoro

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Edited by Nearholmer
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"I feel there is much, much more I want to know about the railways of German East Africa."

Well, they were thin on the ground.

There is also the German Navy L59 Afrika-Schiff airship here (built twice because the first was accidentally destroyed) intended to relieve von L-W and designed so as every component could be re-used after arrival.

It turned back while passing Khartoum after hearing that its planned safe landing area in E Africa had been lost to the KAR and flew back to Bulgaria. This endurance record was not exceeded until WW II.

dh

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All fascinating stuff, into which I shall enjoy delving.  Thanks and feel free to keep it coming.

 

In the meantime, some progress was made on the branch set.  It is quite laborious work, trying to produce finished coaches from the Triang remnants, but, waste not want not.  It remains to be seen if I will ultimately achieve a decent finish.

 

As the Golden Rule is use what is already available where possible, rather than splash out on Gibson 14mm Mansels, I dug out a packet of Hornby or Bachmann coach wheels (can't remember which) and invested in some cast centres for them.

 

Pictured below is the set showing progress thus far.  Coins are placed on the inpermanent way to counter the effect of the slight tilt of the floor, so they are free running!  The last Brake Third is somehow a little down at the stern, which I need to correct.

 

Finally, apropos the recent posts on colonial East Africa, I noted the label on the suitcase in the background!  

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i believe that is mentioned in this episode of The Great War series:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlQgprSGpNI

It is fair to say that The Model Railway Club is unique in at least one aspect, as recorded in the minutes of a meeting on the 13th October 1915:

'The meeting was brought (to) an abrupt conclusion at 9.30 by the visit of Zeppelins to the immediate vicinity.'

 

Tim

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Indeed fascinating stuff.  I note the similarity between the German coach at Usambara and the British Ugandan railway coaches to the turn of the century Indian stock I have been looking at, though quit a difference in gauge.

 

Great work on the WN 4-wheelers.

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Great progress - don't do what I'm forever doing, which is to get distracted once the basic shape has come together.

 

East African colonial railways: the two main ones are well documented, having matured to become parts of EAR, but, by golly, are the feeders obscure!

 

The sigibahn does have a Wikipedia entry, but the other two were ephemeral things. The Lukudeli Valley seems to have been a 60cm gauge line to serve cotton plantations, and only lasted until somewhere around that start of WW1, it was known as the Lindi Baumwolle Bahn, which sounds all cosy. The military line gets no mention in either of the big fat reference books on German military field railways, which do include some very, very, very obscure things. Ideal subjects for models, since nobody can argue!

 

Here is my five-minute imagining of the cotton railway, which probably isn't far out, given that these things were ordered from a catalogue in reality.

 

K

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Edited by Nearholmer
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Hope this isn't straying too far off topic but sometimes the little byways are interesting.

 
The picture earlier of a British soldier - WW1, infantry (tropical) - may be somewhat idealised. My grandfather was in Egypt and Palestine in 1916-18 and he sent back a few photos. The mighty British army looks surprisingly ramshackle in this picture, are any two hats the same? I like the Terry Thomas character in the middle. The photo has 'Lewis Gunners' written on the back of it.
 
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This second photo has 'Cairo Train' on written the back, it might be the train from Alexandria, where they arrived by boat, to Cairo. This is the Egyptian State Railway, 3-plank open wagons built up with roofs to keep the sun off I think. Where are the brakes?
 
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Fascinating photos of Palestine. There has been a series of articles about field railways in Palestine in the journal of the NGRS.

 

Pursuing Deutsche Ostafrika, I have found the attached, which is seriously, seriously interesting (to me, at least!).

 

The loco is typical of what the German army used on short-haul field railways, but could equally have come from a plantation line. There were colonial plantations on Kilwa, so I favour the latter.

 

K

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Edited by Nearholmer
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Good news, I can confirm that the photograph of Wolferton station that I posted earlier does feature the Norfolk Yeomanry as the cavalry escort.

 

The Yeomanry picked and chose its uniforms. This could follow a light cavalry uniform tradition, e.g. hussars or lancers, or a heavy cavalry/dragoon style. The regiment into which I was commissioned, for instance, wore a heavy dragoon uniform similar to the regular Dragoons and Dragoon Guards: Scarlet tunic, blue facings laced gold, silver helmet and horse-hair plume. Very often Yeomanry regiments chose blue, and the Norfolk Yeomanry of the period wore a Dragoon style uniform in blue.

 

In a further post I will supply further and better particulars of both drill order (e.g. when on Camp) and mounted review order (e.g. when on Royal escort duty).

 

For now, I can confirm that the shot below shows HM Queen Alexandra and the King of Greece leaving Wolferton for Sandringham.  My newly arrived volume reveals that the Norfolk (King's Own) Imperial Yeomanry (as it was then known) provided the escort for this visit on 24 November 1905.

 

The volume states that between 1901 and 1914 the regiment was called upon to perform "a very large number of Royal escorts and special duties".

 

The picture shows mounted troopers uniformed in the same style as the Norfolk's contemporary mounted review order behind the Royal carriage.  Note the chap in hussar rig tagging on behind.  

 

    

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That's a line definitely worth modelling. With several people on RMweb building layouts of, or based on, the boring modern Bodmin, and a 2mm one of the equally modern and dull Wadebridge, I think someone needs to do it.

 

It has been done in 0 gauge and appeared in the modeller featuring very early stock. I forget the names of the team.

 

Don

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Good news, I can confirm that the photograph of Wolferton station that I posted earlier does feature the Norfolk Yeomanry as the cavalry escort.

 

The Yeomanry picked and chose its uniforms. This could follow a light cavalry uniform tradition, e.g. hussars or lancers, or a heavy cavalry/dragoon style. The regiment into which I was commissioned, for instance, wore a heavy dragoon uniform similar to the regular Dragoons and Dragoon Guards: Scarlet tunic, blue facings laced gold, silver helmet and horse-hair plume. Very often Yeomanry regiments chose blue, and the Norfolk Yeomanry of the period wore a Dragoon style uniform in blue.

 

 

I think that your problem is going to be that the most suitable figures from the uniform point of view will be Crimean War Heavy Dragoons, but in 20mm they will almost certainly be in action poses, not ceremonial ones. The only figures I can see are by the Russian company Strelets Figures and are plastic - 12 men & 12 horses per set at £6.50. The figures look nicely moulded and seem to paint up OK from what I can gather. Whether there are enough relatively sedate poses to make an escort - perhaps using a couple of boxes - one would have to see. Hannants and a couple of other online shops stock the range.

Edit - I have now spotted the figures displayed out of the box and there are several relatively calm horses and some Dragoons who could be in ceremonial poses, but there are lots that aren't - it's a case of whether it is worth getting several boxes to get enough for an escort. http://www.plasticsoldierreview.com/Review.aspx?id=697 

Edited by phil_sutters
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More relevant to the subject in hand than my recent colonial capers .......

 

This sword came to me via my father, from my great uncle, who appeared in uniform in one of these threads. I think it is late C19th, so he might have had it for ceremonial wear (although it looks pretty utilitarian to me), or have acquired it along the way as a souvenir.

 

Do military experts here present have any idea as to what is actually is?

 

(My father blunted the tip, after one of my brothers stabbed me in the arm with it during a "duel".)

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Iam no

 

More relevant to the subject in hand than my recent colonial capers .......

This sword came to me via my father, from my great uncle, who appeared in uniform in one of these threads. I think it is late C19th, so he might have had it for ceremonial wear (although it looks pretty utilitarian to me), or have acquired it along the way as a souvenir.

Do military experts here present have any idea as to what is actually is?

(My father blunted the tip, after one of my brothers stabbed me in the arm with it during a "duel".)

 

I am no expert, but it does not seem to resemble the 1822-1892 pattern swords, nor the 1908/1912 sabre.

 

I used the latter (1908 ORs's version, 1912 officers').

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More relevant to the subject in hand than my recent colonial capers .......

This sword came to me via my father, from my great uncle, who appeared in uniform in one of these threads. I think it is late C19th, so he might have had it for ceremonial wear (although it looks pretty utilitarian to me), or have acquired it along the way as a souvenir.

Do military experts here present have any idea as to what is actually is?

(My father blunted the tip, after one of my brothers stabbed me in the arm with it during a "duel".)

Looks like this one, 1885 British Cavalry Sabre.

 

http://www.academyofhistoricalarts.co.uk/antiques/sword-04.php

 

article4.pdf

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Wow, yes, very close!

 

A bit of googling suggests that the YC means that it was issued, at some point, to a yeomanry company, and that the little crowns with initials and numbers below identify the inspector who passed it fit for service after testing - there seems to have been some sort of routine test cycle.

 

Is is feasible that a sword as old as 1885 would still have been in issue in the 1910s?

 

Or, might it be an 1890 pattern one?

 

Should have added that it has a quite decorative Birmingham maker's motif engraved very faintly on the blade - I can't read any of it, except the word Birmingham!

 

K

Edited by Nearholmer
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The .PDF file says that the hilt of the 1885 version was re_used on 1890 version

Wow, yes, very close!

A bit of googling suggests that the YC means that it was issued, at some point, to a yeomanry company, and that the little crowns with initials and numbers below identify the inspector who passed it fit for service after testing - there seems to have been some sort of routine test cycle.

Is is feasible that a sword as old as 1885 would still have been in issue in the 1910s?

Or, might it be an 1890 pattern one?

Should have added that it has a quite decorative Birmingham maker's motif engraved very faintly on the blade - I can't read any of it, except the word Birmingham!

K

 

Sounds like your brother was still using it after that date! :)

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http://www.fioredeiliberi.org/antique-swords-uk/for-sale/1885-6/

 

Description :- "An 1885 pattern cavalry troopers' sword, by Weyersberg of Solingen, with copious markings, dating the sword to 1886 and initially being issued to the 1st Dragoon Guards. Sadly missing its scabbard now, but in superb condition regardless, with a bright blade, very clear markings to both sides of the blade ricasso and various parts of the hilt........"

 

Link to image above.

Edited by Shadow
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For the benefit of Compound2632, and any others of a republican persuasion, it might be borne in mind that yours truly once held the Queen's Commission and swore an oath of allegiance to Her Majesty! No offence taken, however.

 

I have now been able to research the uniforms of the King's Own Norfolk Yeomanry.

 

The last Yeomanry formation in Norfolk expired in 1849, with some mounted rifles partially filling the gap between 1861-67 in Norwich. There was, thus, a gap of some half a century without a county Yeomanry for Norfolk, during which time there was a Norfolk squadron of the Loyal Suffolk Hussars. This all changed in 1901, when Edward VII instituted the Norfolk (King's Own) Imperial Yeomanry.

 

The Norfolk Yeomanry, thus, had a connection with the King (they were one of three Yeomanry units with the King as Colonel who rode near the head of his funeral procession in 1911), whose retreat was, of course, Sandringham.  This Royal patronage meant that khaki was not adopted, despite the late date of its formation, and, indeed, it was the last Yeomanry formation to adopt khaki.

 

The home service khaki uniform (a much darker shade than the original khaki worn from the in colonial service) was instituted in January 1902.  I know that it took some time to be reach all units, and the Yeomanry doubtless took time to adopt it, though the Imperial Yeomanry (raised from home-service County Yeomanries) were being raised and equipped in khaki in South Africa. 

 

As a new unit, instituted in 1901, its CO, Major Barclay, suggested to the King that the corps adopt a khaki uniform (I guess he meant light overseas service khaki), to which Edward VII replied "No, none of that convict stuff for my regiment".  The King produced his General Officer's pattern blue patrol jacket and that became the model.  Yellow facings were adopted, though it will be seen that there were colonial and khaki uniform elements until 1905.

 

The regiment did not adopt home-service khaki service dress until 1911-2, and until then wore the blue uniform in drill, as well as review, order.

 

The other consequence of Royal patronage was that the regiment undertook far more escort and parade duties than other County Yeomanries.

 

Finally, I was wondering about the Hussar in the Wolferton picture.  He could be part of the Royal party, such as an Equerry, I suppose.  Alternatively he might be the Norfolk Yeomanry's Regimental Adjutant, who was an officer in the 14th Hussars.

 

More to follow ......

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