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47 minutes ago, gwrrob said:

Were there many of the Stars like this in our period Rich .

Certainly quite a few which had the names removed and Star Class added, in both green and black.  Of the below all bar 23 are listed as receiving black in GWRJ, but some may have been repainted by 47 (I know 25 was repainted in 48 as there is a widely published photo of it ex works at Swindon.
 

4022

4023

4025 as per my model

4026

4028

4030

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one of the benefits of working from home now, is that instead of a long drive in the morning I can do some modelling

 

todays work was focused around adding some coal to finish off 4025.   
 

Using some wire cutters I chopped chunks off a lump of coal which I obtained from the coaling stage at Didcot a few years back. Before gluing into position.  The aim is that I will have locos dedicated to the up and down lines and adjust the coaling levels accordingly.   4025 is a little on the low side, and is going to be struggling to make it all the way to Plymouth even with the assistance engine on the front.   The next ones will be given a false plasticard base to boost the hight and need less coal.

 

do people usually build the coal up in several layers, or use a drip through glue (Klear maybe) in the way you would when ballasting.

 

I also added the coal to my black 4500 which is on the bench for weathering and coupling fitting (at some point...)

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My 42xx has now finally been coaled.  This time using glue soaked tissue paper to pad out the bunker before covering with coal.

 

I have also been working on building the first of my TPOs a Hammond L23 as described here

 

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At the start of the last lock down I got on and finished off rebuilding the ends on a pair of Oxford Rail toads.   Now as we start the second lockdown time to finish off a Bachmann one.  
I can’t stand moulded on handrails, so this toad had them carefully removed several years ago. But I never got a new handrail I was happy with, so the model stayed in a parts box.  More recently Model Railway Developments released an etch for a GW handrail bracket, designed for use on Toads. 


You just have to drill ten 0.6mm holes into which fit the tails of the brackets.   I formed you a new handrail using my bill Bedford jig, threading the brackets on as I went. Before gluing them into position from the inside.   It has also been fitted with Frogmore footsteps and a new brass chimney
 

the roof still needs a coat of paint, while the rest has of course been finished in post war livery

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and after adding some grey black to the roof, and a mix of weathering  powders to tone down those bright white handrails.  Just need some dinghams soldering up and it can go to the layout

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The next painted building for Brent, the coal merchants.  I am unsure about how to finish the distinctive split sign boards having not seen any photos of this building up close.

 

Some research on a nod to Brent had previously identified WA Hawke and Sons of Dartmouth as a strong possibility.  Further research on my part reviewing 1940s telephone directories on the Ancestry website has identified the building as “Hawke & Hawke, Coal and Corn Merchants”, with the telephone Brent 3103

 

at the moment I am thinking about having

 

left hand board                     Right hand beard

 

Hawke & Hawke                    Coal & Corn

    Brent 3103                          Merchants 


I have no idea about the colours, other than the building is very dark, while the signage is a lot lighter.  I’ve gone with the red purely because it makes a good contrast with the grey and all the light / dark stone on the company owned structures 

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A slight interlude while awaiting the next batch of roofs.

 

I picked up a Hornby LMS TPO a while back, with the aim of using it as a stop gap for the loaned LMS coach in the Penzance TPO.   There’s a lot wrong with it (3ft of length for a start), but as I have the model and some time I figured I’d see what I can do with it.

 

The sorting side I have left alone as it seems relatively close looking at photos.  I think I’m right now saying that the two sides are from two different builds, but seeing as you can only see one at a time I can ignore that.

 

it will get one of the surplus nets from the L23 build, I have scratch built the missing recess & door behind the net. 
 

the doors should be recessed, so these were cut out and then repositioned further back.

 

I have made new ends recessed into the body (rather than the rounded black ends sticking out that came on the model).   It will get the corridor connectors added in the correct position.

 

finally the roof vents have been removed for  replacement with MJT castings, while the roof ribs are in line for filing down as a posed to the armour plates ribs on the model

 

Other than filler and paint, the other remaining job is the chassis (ensuring the chassis clears the recessed doors/ cutaway, new bogies)81AE70DA-94B6-4CB9-B4E9-9F1943278A99.jpeg.9f15396a88700fff130954070712ba40.jpeg

 

and a photo of Hawke and Hawke’s premises installed on the layout

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I have cracked on with the A22 first kit, 
I am building this as a hybrid of Mainline and Comet parts.  The sides were first soldered to lengths of 10mm by 1mm brass strip, somewhat overkill (I would use 4by1 if buying the strip) but had the thick stuff in stock.   This gives a rigid side as well as s5FEAC784-2A53-4D3C-A247-A1CFD7ACF5EE.jpeg.58a127a66405e9732b01b5b556dce5ad.jpegomething for the roof to bond to.

 

 
These side units were then soldered to a pair of comet ends (after fitting the steps), before joining or get a complete coach.

Next the roof, the Mainline sides/ends were chopped off and the underside of the roof tidied up.  There are a couple of thick bits at the ends which took extra work.  The second toilet tank was filed off (the rivets will be replaced after priming with Archers transfers).  One end had was cut to shorten the roof, while the other was opened up to match the comet end profile.

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This gets me to the current position, I wanted to glue the roof in place but need to sort the roof vents first.  Usually this would be a case of going to the old Comet website and downloading the instructions.  But Wizard appear to have taken it down which a) means using their not particularly user friendly website and b) finding that they no longer have all the instructions online!  Worse still the wayback machine web archive only has the not useful page one available. So if anyone can message me a scan of the 2nd page of the comet A22 instructions (which has the roof diagram) I’d be  very grateful as I have lost mine.
I want to correct the roof vents while I can work on the roof off model.

The underframe looks an easy job, the body is a perfect fit with the ends sitting against the thicker part of the chassis.  The only modification needed is for both buffer beams to be cut off and reattached further back.

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The interior will need more work, I have drawn up a partition wall for the identical (internally) A20 large window first, so once I fix my laptop I will need to run off two of these.  I then have a choice of cutting up the Mainline interior or using a Comet one.


In short a quick easy conversion for any of the 60ft or less Sunshine stock coaches.  The 61ft examples would need a little more thought to extend the roof

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Working from the photo in Russell, this morning I marked up the new roof details and removed the remains of the old vents.  With that done the roof could be glued onto the brass shell, easier said than done as it appears the roof has bowed slightly and when I left it was not wanting to bond particularly well to the brass (Evostick).  I have left it under some weight and will check back at lunch to see if it has worked on the 2nd attempt.....

 

That just leaves the underframe modification for this evening, at which point the coach can enter the painting pile awaiting Spring.  I am running low on etch primer, so will save my reserves for the TPO for now (given the need to check the effectiveness of filling on the roofs).  So the A22 will get a deep clean before packing away and will be primed in the new year when I am ready to start painting again.

 

Based on this prototype build, I think I will be eventually replacing the sides on the BCK and remaining 4 TK that are in my fleet (along with eventually looking to source move cheap sunshine stock coaches as donors for future builds.)  A rebuild of my BCK into a BTK would be more useful, while another of the thirds is likely to be rebuilt as an E158 composite to complete my Cornish Riviera set (replacing a Mainline third which is currently being used).

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A little lunch time modelling (with apologies to the dog who ended up with a significantly shorter lunchtime walk)

The bufferbeams required a little more thought as my original plan reusing the originals was going to be a little more involved.  The issue was that after cutting the bufferbeam off what remained was almost the right length, so the bufferbeam would need significantly shortening.  The solution was to use the etched part which came with the Comet ends which just happens to be the perfect thickness.  Only downside being that the buffers had to be carefully chopped off the Mainline part and it needed superglue to bond bufferbeam to chassis rather than plasticweld.

 

Corridor connections also reused the Mainline part (reduced in length), and the Mainline wire was reused for the end.  Finally the original roof vents were reused, gluing into the new positions.

 

I did forget to sort out the chassis steps, but other than that the model is now finished ready for painting. 

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A little weathering (and coaling) on Beenham Grange, this was the loco who’s paint I ruined last year experimenting with spraying lacquer to improve the green

 

it had several washes of acrylics before finishing off with weathering powders. 

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I think it will be interesting to compare this with my wartime black grange once the latter is finished.  You can hardly see the green on this 

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With the TPO project stuck awaiting its roof, last night I had a look for something else to work on.  After rummaging through a couple of stock boxes I have found a few projects to try and complete over the winter.

 

First up a Hornby 38xx, this was 90% of the way through converting to P4 (and has lost its tender to my Saint build).  Having a look at the model I think I might have worked out why the con rod / crosshead assembly kept fouling (having put a spacer the wrong side of the drive rod).  While the other side is missing the crosshead assembly completely.  One other consideration is that the rods have all been bushed down to take the gibson crankpins.

Clearly the loco isnt going to be finished in P4, however there is always room for another freight loco on Brent (all be I don’t have room in the fiddleyard).  One thing I don’t have is a 28xx in wartime black so that will be the end goal, more likely than not it will get its tender back from the Saint which can be reunited with its original Wills tender.   So the plan is: Source a new wheelset (either through Hornby spares, swaping the P4 set with someone who is looking to P4 a 2800 in exchange for their OO wheels, or buy a set of Gibsons in OO.)  I think that Option 2 or 3 will likely be the most straight forward.  Once the mechanicals are complete it will then get a respray in black

 

This was followed by looking at a 4500 body and the drawings of a 4400 in Russell debating is it possible to convert one into the other, more research is needed….

 

Finally I had a look at some china clay wagons.  I have seen mention in a couple of places of end tipping diagram O13 china clay wagons being seen in Devon during my period, I just havent seen any photos.  This lack of photos means I havent managed to determine if it would have been a handfull of wagons mixed in a general freight or a long string of the same wagon.  My assumption is the former.  I know there is a good kit available from Parkside in as built condition, but I have 10 of the Bachmann BR model going spare in various poor condition left over from my modern modelling.  There are a few key differences:  The model comes with axleboxes which are wrong for the majority of BR wagons and far too modern for an O13, the bodyside ribs are a different profile and turn under the body rather than going straight down, the end plate at the non tipping end is 9inches on the GWR vs 12inchs on the BR (I only found this out this morning so I need to have another go at correcting this).   Finally the strapping on the GW wagons side door was longer than that on the BR

 

The ribs were reprofiled with a file while the strapping was carefully carved off and replaced with Evergreen strip.  Axleboxes were chopped off and replaced with 51L castings from the spares box.  I now need to try and fix the end plates, so I am torn between filing off the whole thing, scribing the planks and then replacing with the smaller part  OR just file 1mm off the side.   After last nights work I added a quick coat of GWR grey paint to see how its all looking.

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Edited by The Fatadder
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I would have thought there would have been a steady China Clay traffic flow to the potteries and returning empties. I remember reading somewhere (possibly  the article(s) on Tavistock Junction in the GWJ) there was a twenty or thirty wagon train from Cornwall to Tavistock Junction on a more or less daily basis, I don't know where it went from there, but I doubt that it would have been put into ships in the Plymouth area, so that would suggest onward travel eastwards. Perhaps the Stationmaster has timetable for the period, that would shed some light on it.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Siberian Snooper said:

I would have thought there would have been a steady China Clay traffic flow to the potteries and returning empties. I remember reading somewhere (possibly  the article(s) on Tavistock Junction in the GWJ) there was a twenty or thirty wagon train from Cornwall to Tavistock Junction on a more or less daily basis, I don't know where it went from there, but I doubt that it would have been put into ships in the Plymouth area, so that would suggest onward travel eastwards. Perhaps the Stationmaster has timetable for the period, that would shed some light on it.

I really must source a copy of GWRJ 68 (were there more articles in the series?  Only no68 appears to be mentioned on the GWRJ index)

 

The first question would be whether that daily service to Tavistock Junction was carrying clay in the O13 end tippers or if it was transported in barrels in conventional 5 plank opens.  

edit: I did check the 1949 service timetable for the Plymouth division, plenty of freight starting at Tavy Junction but nothing that would allow you to identify what it consists of.

 

I would agree that it was likely transported onward from Plymouth to its destination, there is little logic in shifting it all that way across Cornwall by rail rather than to the more local ports.  I dont think I am going to see any photographic evidence what with there being so few photos of freight services from the period (few enough of any service showing more than just the loco.)  I think I will go ahead put together a block of 10 or so to start with, then bulk out with some Parkside DC braked examples later on.

 

But before I get much further with that I am going to build another etched kit, as I would like to get my O33 built to put with the TPO.

 

 

Edited by The Fatadder
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The trouble is that an awful lot of freight travelled at night, so even less chance of being photographed.

 

Don't quote me but the Tavistock Junction article may have run to as many as three issues.

 

I wonder if the Teign valley ball clay was sent by rail to Fowey in your period.

 

 

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On 19/11/2020 at 16:05, The Fatadder said:

I really must source a copy of GWRJ 68 (were there more articles in the series?  Only no68 appears to be mentioned on the GWRJ index)

 

.......

 

 


It looks to be only issue 68. I will PM you!

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While I still havent gotten to the bottom of the china clay workings, and my efforts to determine if a clay working through Brent would be a load of Ball Clay heading to Cornwall for onward dispatch (as indicated as a working in BR days in the Vaughn book), a delivery of Cornish clay to the potteries (would this be in O13s) or finally a delivery of South Devon clay to Cornwall for onward shipment (again referred to in Vaughn in the 1950s)  think I will give the GWR E-Group a go to see if anyone can shed some light on it.

 

I have continued to work on the wagons.  I have 6 wagons which have been fitted with P4 & Instanter couplings and a further 8 which are still fitted with tension locks but have no wheels.  My current plan is to do something with the 6 and try selling the remainder (if I can get a decent price without wheels / hoods).  If not they may eventually also get rebuilt.

 

So at present I have a number of test builds on going while I try to determine just how far I will take the work.

 

The first wagon had the body side ribs profile changed to match the O13, bottoms of the ribs rounded off and tucked under the body, door strapping changed, Door bangers added (from scrap brass fret), a wire tie bar, the end tipping mechanism, new axle boxes and a PC Models wagon sheet.  I have also replaced the vertical guide rail on the brake leaver with more brass fret (avoiding the foot thick lump of plastic on the end.)  A lump of tissue paper was used as a former to get the bulge in the wagon sheet.

D628B304-9565-43C8-9E07-F8BDE7B35CCC.jpeg.d027da6214a19c9297d7f80bb5bbd08c.jpeg

 

 

The next wagon has most of the above (and will gain the rest), instead of the brass guard on the brake leaver I have cut the plastic down to be much thinner.  This was the plan on the first wagon, but a slip of the knife took off the good side leaving me with the scrap which called for a revised approach.  On this wagon I have also corrected the thickness of the end plating (9 inches vs 12 inches on the OOV).  It has been fitted with a foam block as the former for the load (getting a more pronounced bulge.)   I am unconvinced if the extra effort on the end strapping is worthwhile, given that so little of the work is visible.  It may be a case of just doing the modification for the lower plank.  Likewise the correction to the door strapping and the door opening mechanism would only be worth while on an empty wagon (and to be honest for an empty I would be more inclined to use the Parkside kit)

I also did some experiments with filler to see if I could knock up a convincing GWR oil axle box out of plastic and filler, but it was taking longer than just using the castings so the attempt was aborted. 

 

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Edited by The Fatadder
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The first half of the clay set is progressing well, with the other 5 wagons modified and painted last night.   I have also made an adaptor wagon with a dingham hook on one end and instanter on the other to allow it to couple up to a loco or brake van.  I now need to solder up a dingham with loop to fit on the other end.

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some of the wagons were missing their weights, so lead flashing was added to bring them up to a consistent level.

 

tonight I will get the transfers applied along with adding the wagon sheets

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A little work on my heavy tanks,

 

4292 has been fitted with the Brassmasters frame overlays, buffer beam brackets and guard irons, along with new sandbox castings and mushroom vents.

this was followed by painting the chassis block and wheels in a weathered mix, and adding some more weathering to the body (which just needs the finishing powders now).  
it’s never been a good runner, something I had down to the poor design.  Stripping down the motor / gearbox there is no sign of any lubrication.  So it now needs to wait until some oil arrives from Gaugemaster before I can reassemble. 
 

I’ve just noticed that both 4292 and my 72xx are missing the cab steps (if any one has some spare please drop me a pm) and much more difficult a cab step is missing from 4292 which will need a scratch built replacement 

 

next will be giving the 72xx a going over

 

 

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Moving on to the 72xx

 

This followed the same process as the 42xx, stripping down the chassis before fitting the etched frame overlays.  7250 is from the improved batch of 72xx with a chassis fitted with bearings (and the body with a separate smoke box dart.) 

 

I haven’t fitted the buffer beam brackets (because of the potential obstruction by the moving rear frame, and that it is hidden by the rear step), but this time have fitted the lower reverser bracket and the brake linkage.

 

the rear wheel assembly had to be filed to reduce the width slightly to allow some movement between the higher frames   

 

Again as with the 42xx it was a 2nd hand purchase and is missing the front steps which will need sourcing (or scratch building).
 

The frames were given a coat of weathered black paint, as were the black areas on the body and the bunker.   I have also fitted the etched fender to the top of the bunker (the base model not having one).AB7AFBCE-634A-4B4D-B1AB-C17BA7178D77.jpeg.9573683f2d475e28b943e48ef4dcdd17.jpeg

 

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I have improved the photo plank with w back scene, but the lighting is awful

Edited by The Fatadder
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At lunch today I gave 7250 a coat of Dullcote in advance of some light weathering with powders to go with the weathered black that was finished last night.

 

I think it makes a real difference to the colour, rather less of a tepid green.   I think in the spring I will have to make a concerted effort to varnish the rest of my green GWR locos.

 

The model also had a little shininess from where I had removed the Great Western logo and replaced with the G W R.  The Dullcote has done a good job blending it in.

 

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Dullcote is such a great product.  As you say it gets rid of "toy green" and ages paint with little effort.

 

Not tried it with powders - I prefer paint weathering, but I'm guessing on top of powder it would seal it in place?

 

Dull cote can also help hugely with those  trouble some water slide transfers which sometimes evade the work of Microsol etc.  

 

But be careful if you have real coal in the bunker - make a mask of paper to cover it before you "Dullcote".

 

 

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It doesn’t just get rid of the toy like finish, I find it blends in brush painted areas rather nicely, and bits painted in different shades.  (7250 has a couple of small patches of Phoenix GWR green painted on the tank sides along with the rear fender)

 

my normal weathering technique is to paint black areas in a dirty black mix, then paint on / wipe off on the body with various mixes (Vallejo) before adding any streaky bits and finishing off with powders.   7250 I want to be fairly clean, so it’s had the black bits toned down with paint and will just get the powders to finish off 

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