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checkrail

Stoke Courtenay

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Two Cambrian kits for LMS 12 ton vans were also completed, a D1664 and a D1676 version.  I'd have to go and look closely at them again to tell you the difference between them!

 

Here's one behind Newton Abbot's 8709 ….

P1050646_(2).JPG.3028b4e782fd2891e69fb5bd8101f747.JPG

 

… and here's the other, together with an SR 5 plank open (Cambrian kit again), behind 3603.

1679759932_P1050648(2).JPG.a90347934d40f2c9883b0a715b382b0e.JPG

 

John C.

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Generally speaking using a higher ISO setting will result in less image quality. In the same way as buying higher ISO 35mm film the image quality is compromised by the increased light sensitivity required to get the exposure. 

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Finally, here are two more SR opens. I know very little of SR wagons, but these high-sided 8 plank types seem to be very characteristic of that company so I thought I'd better have a couple.  The one nearest 4574 is an ex-LSWR vehicle with a sheet rail, while the other is a later SR version without that feature.  I finished the latter in the post 1936 style with small letters to add a bit of variety.  As my layout is set in 1939 I use this scheme very sparingly for all big four wagons.  

P1050647.JPG.ea758f15557713cb994ccec99a65ef86.JPG

John C.

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Liking your new wagons John. A few kits can certainly provide some welcome variety in one's fleet.

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John, I'm very interested in the results you are getting with Affinity. I had a look at it on their website last night and it seems impressive. I've used various versions of Photoshop Elements for years and it's second nature to me now but sometimes I think there must be something more - it certainly doesn't cater for focus merging. Watching with interest.

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Hi John

 

I have been following and thoroughly enjoying your thread for some time. We both model GWR and a broadly similar timescale but there couldnt be a greater contrast in location!

I see, however, that we are both users of Affinity......I switched from photoshop elements a couple of years ago. Its an amazing programme although I just scratch the surface....crop and some or all of the autocorrect buttons I am afraid. In my ignorance I didnt even know it did focus stacking. Your excellent examples, you really can tell the difference, have inspired me to have another go........I am struggling to find it in the menu......when you have a moment could you give me a pointer please?

 

Enjoy your holiday

 

John

 

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On 29/09/2019 at 21:31, colin penfold said:

Generally speaking using a higher ISO setting will result in less image quality. In the same way as buying higher ISO 35mm film the image quality is compromised by the increased light sensitivity required to get the exposure. 

 

Yes, albeit this is an area that has come on a great deal in digital cameras. If you have a DSLR or similar, the ISO can be raised quite a way before impacting on image quality. The top of the range full frame DSLRs for sensible image sizes I've read can go up to ISO 6400 before quality is noticeably affected. Even in my m3/4 olympus ISO 1600 is reasonable. But you'd only do this for handheld shots where you can't have a long shutter speed. If we're talking focus stacking then the camera I presume is resting somewhere so you can keep the ISO low, have a small aperture F11 or smaller and let the shutter speed be as long as it needs to be.

 

For smaller cameras then the sensor is smaller in physical size which means it is more prone to noise, so lower ISOs better. Camera phones probably same applies but the high end ones I think have lots of software wizardry to help.

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On 30/09/2019 at 20:10, john dew said:

I see, however, that we are both users of Affinity......I switched from photoshop elements a couple of years ago. Its an amazing programme although I just scratch the surface....crop and some or all of the autocorrect buttons I am afraid. In my ignorance I didnt even know it did focus stacking. Your excellent examples, you really can tell the difference, have inspired me to have another go........I am struggling to find it in the menu......when you have a moment could you give me a pointer please?

Hi John

 

On the Affinity Photo home page click on 'File' (top left) and among the options on the drop-down menu that will appear you'll find 'New focus merge'. Click on that and a box will appear with an 'Add' button at the bottom.  Double clicking on that will allow you to select frames for merging from your photo files.  When you've added them click 'Ok' and it will do its magic, eventually providing you with one merged image.  Go back to the drop-down menu and select 'Export' and you'll get an option to save the merged image as a jpeg or whatever to your original photo files.  (Of course if you're using a camera's post-focus or 4K video burst feature you'll need to have separated and saved the component frames before bringing Affinity into play.)

 

Must spend more time catching up with Granby Junction.  What a satisfyingly busy and railwaylike scene it represents!

 

Regards,

John.

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Lovely photos again.

 

Maybe the first cropping experiment has been zoomed a bit too much??? I think the slight fuzziness in the distance might be due to pixel subsampling - or it might be just my imagination...

 

Edited by Harlequin
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5 hours ago, checkrail said:

More of Launceston Castle', result of focus stacking and cropping experiments.

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_10/237245669_5000merged(2).jpg.953571638abc12894d238e184d9ceaf5.jpg

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_10/549414607_5000merged(3).jpg.b95b8f7ee49318e22ac3bd41d86e0b5c.jpg

Looks like those two guys have been standing there for years.  Oh - they have!

 

John C.

I can almost feel the ground shake !

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Next thing was to try focus stacking with a string of goods vehicles, so here's 2819 of Laira shed bound for Tavistock Junction with a class H freight.

1066689326_28xxMerged1.jpg.bb9e43f7a2466b3e175008f8cdc3d230.jpg

 

947453386_28xxmerged2.jpg.87585eafa80943cedba8ba0e8dec388c.jpg

 

More to follow when they've been processed.

John C.

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That second shot is so realistic.

 

Bill.

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Excellent pictures again, John. To my eyes/taste possibly the last few pictures are a tad underexposed, they look quite dark to me, or is that the intent, a storm brewing?

 

(The photos do show off your excellent hand built pointwork. The last one wouldn't look as convincing with a normal Peco point stuck in there. I am holding out for Peco to fill in the gaps in their bullhead range then I think I'll replace the ones I have.)

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Lovely set of pictures:senile::senile:

 

thanks neil.

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I particularly like the last one. The tank wagon has a wonderfully evocative patina and the dark, almost brooding, mood adds interest.

Edited by Anglian
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10 hours ago, The Great Bear said:

To my eyes/taste possibly the last few pictures are a tad underexposed, they look quite dark to me, or is that the intent, a storm brewing?

 

Thanks for kind comments.  You're right - still some work to do re exposures.  But the 'storm brewing' effect on this section of the layout is at least partly caused by shadow created by the curved backscene, sprung in behind the purlins and arching forward over the tracks!

 

Regards,

John.

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10 hours ago, Anglian said:

The tank wagon has a wonderfully evocative patina and the dark, almost brooding, mood adds interest.

 

To be honest the weathering of this Bachmann tank wagon was a very quick, almost slapdash, job with a wide brush and some black Vallejo wash (with maybe a bit of brown on the underframe.  Was pleased with how it turned out.

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2819 again.  It is of course not heading for Tavvy Jcn., as I said yesterday, but coming from there and heading east!

28xx_merged_5.jpg.02b65df73eda6b86ad1efaaf10804596.jpg

 

With the second one I'm afraid I had to crop off most of the down home signal arm to excise a view of the bottom of one of the purlins. 

90515207_28xxmerged6.jpg.503d6b8b2bfe1504b5a085602fc6f9d0.jpg

John C.

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10 minutes ago, checkrail said:

2819 again.  It is of course not heading for Tavvy Jcn., as I said yesterday, but coming from there and heading east!

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_10/28xx_merged_5.jpg.02b65df73eda6b86ad1efaaf10804596.jpg

 

With the second one I'm afraid I had to crop off most of the down home signal arm to excise a view of the bottom of one of the purlins. 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_10/90515207_28xxmerged6.jpg.503d6b8b2bfe1504b5a085602fc6f9d0.jpg

John C.

Looking beautiful John, I notice the signal in the first photo is lit. Remind me, are they working Dapol signals, with a few modifications?

 

Regards Connor

 

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Hi John, You ought to be able paint out the offending purlin as an alternative to cropping if you want.

 

Affinity Photo has various tools to pick up other parts of the image, which can then be used to overpaint the unwanted area. (See the Clone tool and the Heal tool).

 

They are little bit clunky to use and I was hoping to find the easier "magic erase" tool like Photoshop and Xara Designer have - but there doesn't seem to be one in AP at a quick glance. (E.g.: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uTjKCoEOAPo)

 

 

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