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Ernies 7mm Wagons - More Re-cycling

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Good evening,

Worked most of the day, was able to take a few pictures for my main thread. The modelling highlight of the day was the Hattons parcel waiting for me when I got home.. Inside was the BR 5 plank, steel ends, unfitted in a finish to represent unpainted wood.

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For me the jury is out on the rocking solebar on one side.

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I think the principle is fine, but as noticed on a lionheart wagon it seems to need more weight in the wagon to make it work properly. I note that the wheels have pinpoint axles and a finer flange than the Dapol Spoked wheels that arrived in the same box:

post-2484-0-42637800-1502572546_thumb.jpg

I have grown to like the parallel tubular bearing over the pin point that is the norm in 4mm. (As an aside I remember articles by Bob East where he turned down the ends of Hornby Dublo axles and used a piece of PTFE tube for a bearing, funny how things stick in your mind...)

The couplings must be the Lionheart style; nice links, not sure about the hooks. Might be styled for function, but I prefer the pure Dapol Hooks as in their Screw Couplings, especially when compared to the real RCH hook.

Lionheart style

post-2484-0-32171500-1502572582_thumb.jpg

Dapol Screw Coupling

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RCH Drawbar

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Under the headstock is a box. Is that a mounting for a Kadee coupler?

post-2484-0-84895600-1502572531_thumb.jpg.

My moans aside, a very nice model.

It comes with Moreton Brakework i.e. 2 blocks only. I intend to fit another set of brakework and a vacuum cylinder. It will get a repaint (bauxite as a base), with maybe some subtle wood graining added as the planks seem very smooth.

I did look for a previous review, but couldn't find anything. If I gone over things already covered, please excuse me. 4266 2510  4346 2610   4720 3110 4929 0211 5016 0311 5203 0611 6525 2003   -  7758 10-09 8218 071018    8489 281018 9825 221218  10348 311218 10408 010119 10547 030119 10672 10777 05012019  11006 0901 11182 1201 11263 1302 12867 0303

Edited by The Bigbee Line
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I must say that the three point compensation using two wheel on one side works well.

 

I do not understand this obsession in 4 and 7mm to want to make wooden objects rough. I have a tatty lump of timber out side my back door. It is naturally weathered and you have to be three foot away to see any textures. I can't get that close to a model. Even in 7mm my nose gets in the way. As for a painted timber any painter worth his salt would be ashamed if there was grain showing through his work. Yes wagons were not given such high finished as other things. But the timber even if sized with a saw would be fairly as smooth.

Edited by N15class

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Good afternoon,

 

In this day and age you don't get to see much timber being fitted to wagons, other than in preservation.  I have been lucky in that in my time I have seen what goes on in an old fashioned wagon works.  Here is a picture of 217060940467 a 'Ferry Tube' having its 'Revision' in Toton Wagon Shops.  20th February 2002.

 

Yoy will notice the woodwork that has been replaced.  I suspect that the timber not replaced was original.  The replacement timber may not be rough but it does have texture.  It had been sawn to size in the shop.  The floor boards were quite rough and a different timber to the sides.

 

post-2484-0-15106200-1502798365_thumb.jpg

 

Here are some pictures of an ODA 113146.  A patchwork of colours, the close up of the data panel shows where the paint seems to have lifted the grain.  The lettering bears witness to the texture on the surface.

 

post-2484-0-07708000-1502798821_thumb.jpg

 

post-2484-0-27850800-1502798830.jpg

 

Not sure how I'm going to tackle that on the Dapol 5 plank open.  The sides need painting so will think about what to do to add that characature of grain and surface texture.

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I agree with you that it can be seen but it's your brain saying it rough not the eyes. To do the finish in paint would lead your brain to the same thing. With sawn wood I suppose 1/32nd of an inch which in 7mm is 0.018mm which could well be within manufacturing tolerance of plastics used.

My experience in the clock trade never ceased to amaze me that people expected a plastic wood effect clock case to have a visible grain and a textured surface. But would not buy a wooden cased clock unless it was smooth and highly polished.

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Postings regarding wagons for O gauge will henceforth be on this page.

 

Each new posting will have any additions edited to the original posting (keeping it all together)  I hope...

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HYMAC EP Perhaps...

 

Good evening.  I have decided to keep the wagon posts together...  More disciplined and all that.

 

My latest 'can't resist' purchase from Ebay was 4 spares of repairs O gauge wagons; 2 cattle wagons, a CooperCraft GW Machinery wagon and a Machinery wagon....

 

post-2484-0-47440300-1503687159.jpg

 

It arrived and I was pleasantly surprised by the quality.  A change from some purchases.  The stranger is the machinery wagon.  It has whitemetal headstocks, side frames, axle guards and curb rails.  The deck is scribed plasticard.  It's very heavy and has no makers identification that I can see.  The white metal parts appear soldered together.

 

post-2484-0-95917000-1503687157_thumb.jpg

 

It has been lettered E906245 LOWMAC.

 

I cannot find much reference at all other than in my book ; British Railway Goods Wagons in Colour by Robert Hendry.  There is a diagram on page 89 giving details of the HYMAC EP, of which 6 were built at Lancing Works.  B906000 - B906005, So I might trawl my Southern Wagon books.

 

The wheels in the diagram are shown as 2'9" and I suspect it had ordinary wagon size fitted as the buffer height is a bit on the high side.

 

 

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Thanks for the tip. I'll trawl the internet for pictures. A set of smaller wheels will give it the right look. Then to find a suitable load. I did think about a group of wagons representing a farmer moving farms....

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There are photos of a similar wagon here:- http://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/byhymacex 

By the time the photo was taken, the wagon had received roller bearings: Paul might be able to confirm, but I think it was being used as spacer wagon between wagons carrying long pre-cast concrete beams, which I think may have originated at Lenwade. It's an odd type of wagon; most of the things it would have carried could have been put on Lowfits and Lowmacs, the former of which was readily available, and the latter being more flexible. It was probably built to replace a pre-Grouping type which had become life-expired, even if the traffic it was built for was no longer carried by rail- this happened a lot in the 'Specials' fleet.

I would not be surprised to find that the original design was a Great-Eastern wagon. There were a lot of agricultural-machinery manufacturers on their patch.

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Thanks Brian. It's in a later series and flatter. I think there is a kit of one in etched brass that was a NER prototype. I think I might have to "wing it". As you know I'm a bit of an uncouthed heathen....

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Connoseur Models

 

Agricultural Implement Wagon

 

PROTOTYPE. Seventeen of these wagons were built by the NER in 1916 for the transportation of farm machinery, tractors and small portable engines. These were driven or winched onto the wagon from an end loading dock and then lashed down into the well section using the floor mounted securing rings. The lowered centre section of the wagon provided high loads with extra clearance to allow them to remain within the railway loading gauge.

 

When first built these special purpose wagons would be used to convey loads from North Eastern stations to destinations throughout Britain. After the 1923 grouping any LNER station could order up one of these wagons to dispatch a load to destinations throughout the country. These wagons lasted in service well into British Railways days.

 

KIT. This is a very straightforward kit. Some push out rivet detail, a few parts requiring simple folding and a selection of small detail parts make this an interesting project. The careful modeller can make the individual load securing rings fully working and then use these to lash down one of the delightful 1:43 scale Die-Cast tractors or agricultural machines that are available from model and toy shops.

Edited by The Bigbee Line

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Connoseur Models

 

Agricultural Implement Wagon

 

PROTOTYPE. Seventeen of these wagons were built by the NER in 1916 for the transportation of farm machinery, tractors and small portable engines. These were driven or winched onto the wagon from an end loading dock and then lashed down into the well section using the floor mounted securing rings. The lowered centre section of the wagon provided high loads with extra clearance to allow them to remain within the railway loading gauge.

 

When first built these special purpose wagons would be used to convey loads from North Eastern stations to destinations throughout Britain. After the 1923 grouping any LNER station could order up one of these wagons to dispatch a load to destinations throughout the country. These wagons lasted in service well into British Railways days.

 

KIT. This is a very straightforward kit. Some push out rivet detail, a few parts requiring simple folding and a selection of small detail parts make this an interesting project. The careful modeller can make the individual load securing rings fully working and then use these to lash down one of the delightful 1:43 scale Die-Cast tractors or agricultural machines that are available from model and toy shops.

 

BR still had 13 different Hymac diagrams inherited from LMS, LNER and GWR in 1953. Their own was unlike these because it had a horizontal side strip which 'hid' the well.

 

This is probably a model of one of the numerous designs of  LNER IMPs - mainly inherited from their constituents. The number is reminiscent of one of the series used by the LNER for engineers stock.

 

Paul

Edited by hmrspaul

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GETTING OLDER

 

As you get older you forget things,,,, my foray into O gauge has been an enlightening experience. I am trying very hard to avoid the "Too much stuff" syndrome. But at the same time getting on with stuff and using all the bits and pieces that I've purchased. To that end I need to list all my O gauge projects and allocate the relevant parts. Sad but essential. Once my current eBay bids have run their course that will be it for purchases.

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BUFFERS

 

Good morning.  During non modelling periods I quite often find myself thinking through various things....  One of these is buffers, the thoughts are:

 

Sprung buffers often have the mechanism gummed up or rusty

 

The coil springs are very fine and prone to jamming.

 

The shortness allows them droop, which I think looks naff.

 

I had a thought about making the heads and shafts myself so looked for a low tech method.  Last night I put one theory into practice using M2 bolts with the heads filed down and a thin brass washer soldered on....

 

Three variants:

 

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Close ups:

 

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Comparison with a Coopecraft head:

 

post-2484-0-74499900-1503914615_thumb.jpg

 

Head comparison with a Parkside whitemetal RCH:

 

post-2484-0-15725600-1503914621_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

 

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post-2484-0-77788300-1503914583_thumb.jpg

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7 Plank Mineral Wagon

 

After an evening sorting out stuff yesterday I thought I had to do a bit of modelling today.

 

The mineral wagon needed its removable solebar fettled to allow adjustment.  The holes were slotted a little:

 

post-2484-0-66485100-1504032618_thumb.jpg

 

It was then screwed on, the slack taken out of axle end float and the 2 screws tightened, snug as a bug in a rug...

 

post-2484-0-31077300-1504032628_thumb.jpg

 

On Saturday during our visit to Bristol we went to the Antics Online Shop.  Not a bad shop, and I purchased some weathering washes..

 

I decided to give the Mineral Wagon some treatment:

 

post-2484-0-01468000-1504032639_thumb.jpg

 

The some additional layers and then decals...

 

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The Dapol 7 plank seems too large in comparison.  I might try weathering and see what that does.....

 

post-2484-0-69214500-1504032669_thumb.jpg

 

Brass door stop from a bit of spare fret from some couplings

 

post-2484-0-23063100-1504032680_thumb.jpg

 

Here with the door stop a little shorter; it was re-bent and the extra allowed a nice tang into the hole in the wagon side..

 

post-2484-0-08524200-1504032695_thumb.jpg

 

The couplings need adding, plus white line to denote the end door, white on the brake lever.  I think some general whitish weathering..  Then that might be it...  Maybe a removable coal load....

 

 

 

 

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Do I, don't I.....  Mmmmmm...

 

Out came the brush and a quick coat of weathering wash on the Dapol 7 plank...

 

A definite improvement.

 

post-2484-0-37355800-1504043300_thumb.jpg

 

Compared with the 3H wagon it looks a scale bigger.  I must say I prefer the look of the 3H over the Dapol.

 

post-2484-0-67075600-1504043304_thumb.jpg

 

This is the weathering enamel by AK Interactive.  Nice and easy to apply, I'll be sending for some other colours to give some variety

 

post-2484-0-57570300-1504043310_thumb.jpg

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Although the Dapol one is the more accurate, ignoring the brake lever, making the 3H one look relatively crude in terms of its detailing.

 

Jim

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Tamiya have something called Panel Lining Paint which seems to me to be similar.  It does a nice job bringing out natural wood detail.

 

John

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Although the Dapol one is the more accurate, ignoring the brake lever, making the 3H one look relatively crude in terms of its detailing.

 

Jim

Jim,

 

Thanks for that.  The brake levers are on the hit list..  Is the lettering Ok as it seems a little on the large size?  Should I also more the pivot bar for the end door?  Those look like easy fixes (maybe)

 

Ernie

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Tamiya have something called Panel Lining Paint which seems to me to be similar.  It does a nice job bringing out natural wood detail.

 

John

John,

 

Thanks for the tip I'll have a look.  Quite please with how these went on today.  Thin but giving the chance to build up the colours, just need to find a few colour pictures of wagons from the late 50's / early 60's

 

Ernie

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Jim,

 

Thanks for that.  The brake levers are on the hit list..  Is the lettering Ok as it seems a little on the large size?  Should I also more the pivot bar for the end door?  Those look like easy fixes (maybe)

 

Ernie

The lettering is a little on the heavy side, but whether or not you want to replace it is a matter of taste. as regards the end door pivot bar, there is quite a lot of variation permitted by the RCH specifications, Dapol haven't got it quite right for any of the versions, but they haven't got it badly wrong either and any alterations you could make would be very delicate, so froma practical viewpoint, it is probably better left alone.

 

Jim

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The lettering is a little on the heavy side, but whether or not you want to replace it is a matter of taste. as regards the end door pivot bar, there is quite a lot of variation permitted by the RCH specifications, Dapol haven't got it quite right for any of the versions, but they haven't got it badly wrong either and any alterations you could make would be very delicate, so froma practical viewpoint, it is probably better left alone.

 

Jim

Jim,

 

Thanks for the tip.  I have been looking for pictures on the internet, thinking that there would be loads, but actually seem elusive...  Especially showing the detail that you want....

 

Regards,

 

Ernie

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Tank Wagon via the Trainferry

 

I've been looking to add some early Ferry Wagons from the late 50's / early 60's and regularly do a search on ebay.  Came across this tank wagon the other day.  Looks to be a tank wagon suitable for the period,  Running from the continent via Dover and Headcorn for a Chemical Plant in Tenterden.  In reality the Exmover used by BR was made in the Tenterden area.....

 

post-2484-0-43233900-1504188944.jpg

 

A nice model.  Sprung axleboxes and all brake work.  Maybe just add a vacuum through pipe.  It only has a handbrake on the veranda.  Must check some contemporary tanks to see if a lever of wheeled handbrake would be appropriate.  I know that some wagons operated to the UK with veranda handbrakes only.  The lettering can have a black patch over the existing (to allow easy removal if required) just need to sort out some suitable lettering.  Then need to check when the towing and tie down eyes were added..

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Tank Wagon via the Trainferry

 

I've been looking to add some early Ferry Wagons from the late 50's / early 60's and regularly do a search on ebay.  Came across this tank wagon the other day.  Looks to be a tank wagon suitable for the period,  Running from the continent via Dover and Headcorn for a Chemical Plant in Tenterden.  In reality the Exmover used by BR was made in the Tenterden area.....

 

attachicon.giftank.jpg

 

A nice model.  Sprung axleboxes and all brake work.  Maybe just add a vacuum through pipe.  It only has a handbrake on the veranda.  Must check some contemporary tanks to see if a lever of wheeled handbrake would be appropriate.  I know that some wagons operated to the UK with veranda handbrakes only.  The lettering can have a black patch over the existing (to allow easy removal if required) just need to sort out some suitable lettering.  Then need to check when the towing and tie down eyes were added..

A quick look through the two volumes of 'Non-Pool Freight Stock 1948-68' by David Larkin showed several similar, German-registered tanks, photographed in the '50s. All had lever handbrakes, generally without the noticeable bends at the top characteristic of British stock.

Was there much rhubarb growing around Tenterden? Exmover was based on oxalic acid, the toxin in rhubarb leaves.

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A quick look through the two volumes of 'Non-Pool Freight Stock 1948-68' by David Larkin showed several similar, German-registered tanks, photographed in the '50s. All had lever handbrakes, generally without the noticeable bends at the top characteristic of British stock.

Was there much rhubarb growing around Tenterden? Exmover was based on oxalic acid, the toxin in rhubarb leaves.

Thanks for the info.  In the mid 80's I did a stint as Acting Chargeman on the Cleaning and Freight Gang.  At the time the in thing was Wundergung a thickened version of exmover.  I remember the company was in Tenterden, but cannot remember exactly where...

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Thanks for the info.  In the mid 80's I did a stint as Acting Chargeman on the Cleaning and Freight Gang.  At the time the in thing was Wundergung a thickened version of exmover.  I remember the company was in Tenterden, but cannot remember exactly where...

Funny how some of these firms were tucked away. Rail-head de-icing fluid was produced at a plant in Haltwhistle, between Newcastle and Carlisle, which also made similar products for airports.

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