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Skinnylinny

Great Southern Railway (Fictitious) - Mr. Adams' Finest

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8 hours ago, Skinnylinny said:

So, with the signalbox behind me... I've started on the Petite Properties Station Road Semi kit. It's being clad with Slaters English Bond Plasticard, and this is my first experience with this material. It has been... interesting. On the one hand, I'm delighted by the neat brickwork, and the relief. On the other, trying to trim it neatly to fit the window opening is rather fiddly - the knife will quite happily follow horizontal mortar courses, but vertical ones seem more challenging.

However, for an evening's work, it is already looking a bit more refined than a Metcalfe kit!

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/House.png.407a63123429f8ada36bbdf525b56a86.png

I love working with textured plasticard. Trust me, you'll get used to it. 

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Unfortunately I can't seem to access that Web page - I'm getting an error that the page is timing out. What do you been by the courses not lining up with Slaters bricks? 

 

I mainly went with what was available at my local model shop - as I was just trying out the material it didn't make sense to pay for postage too, if I decided I didn't like it! 

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1 hour ago, Skinnylinny said:

Unfortunately I can't seem to access that Web page - I'm getting an error that the page is timing out. What do you been by the courses not lining up with Slaters bricks? 

 

I mainly went with what was available at my local model shop - as I was just trying out the material it didn't make sense to pay for postage too, if I decided I didn't like it! 

Keep an eye out for Auhagen ones and for Wills ones. They're what I use and they're very good. 

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I've tried the Wills sheets but found them extremely difficult to cut, and not flexible at all. I think I'm currently preferring plasticard glued to the laser cut wood. 

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6 hours ago, Skinnylinny said:

I've tried the Wills sheets but found them extremely difficult to cut, and not flexible at all. I think I'm currently preferring plasticard glued to the laser cut wood. 

Fair. Each to their own. 

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8 hours ago, Skinnylinny said:

I've tried the Wills sheets but found them extremely difficult to cut, and not flexible at all. I think I'm currently preferring plasticard glued to the laser cut wood. 

have you tried an Olfa cutter?  Makes working with thicker plastic much easier/

 

image.png.14dd9c49c55c1a53f34efdb77f9ecbc3.png

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A little more work has got the houses further on. I'm not quite convinced by my join at the far end in this photo, so I may try to hide it under a drain pipe from the guttering.

I have a vague memory that I read somewhere that white window frames weren't common during the Victorian/Edwardian period, due to how quickly they showed the dirt - can anyone confirm this? The windows that have been fitted so far are fitted with Glue-n-Glaze, so should be easily enough popped out. I've gone for dark colours for front doors (black and bottle green). I'm also wondering whether to fit the dormer windows in the roof, or just to make the whole roof flat - were dormer windows common in properties like this in the late 1890s-early 1910s, or were they more a product of loft conversions?

 

20190820_193112.jpg

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2 hours ago, Skinnylinny said:

- were dormer windows common in properties like this in the late 1890s-early 1910s, or were they more a product of loft conversions?

I can't comment on the south of England, but I've had a quick look through some of my Stenlake books of old photographs of towns and villages in central Scotland in the late c19th and early c20th and dormer windows are not uncommon. Some have very elaborate barge boards. 

 

Jim 

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I think the topic of window frame colours was over in Castle Aching some months ago. Certainly when I've seen properties that have been abandoned for what would appear to be a considerable length of time, the window frames appear to have been painted in green or other darker shades.

 

I think it's also to do with what the paints were based on.

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Posted (edited)

Many white paints were based on white lead, which quite rapidly discoloured in sulphurous ( read that as coal burning) atmospheres.  However by the late 1880s and maybe earlier, white paints were being based on zinc rather than lead - but at a cost.  This was a much more stable white colour.

 

So simplistically there is no easy answer.  Poorer owners of properties might well resort to darker colours (green and brown seem to have been common), but those owned by people of means could have been painted with the new improved "white".   

 

Edit to add:  properties with accommodation for the servants in the attic (aka Dormer bedroom) and with very ornate windows at the ground level suggest people who could and would afford zinc based white paint.

Edited by Andy Hayter
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Also of course white sashes with coloured frames was quite a thing.   The paintwork on my Victorian stone house was various shades of brown (with and without light sashes) until it went dark red with ivory sashes, then all green, followed by all blue, and under my stewardship cream with blue doors and black ironwork.  It must have looked very smart in red and ivory, but I suspect that the various brown/stone shades were much more serviceable! 

Steve

Shepton

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There was some discussion on Castle Aching about wooden window paint colours.  It was felt that wood was painted in dark colours.  Others pointed out that white lead paint was used, which darkened.

 

I am sure both these assertions are correct, and evidence may be found of them, but Edwardian coloured pictures and paintings also show white window work (and white casements in dark painted frames) were evident.

 

See This post for pictures

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On 15/08/2019 at 20:46, Caley Jim said:

He claimed that half his patients worked for Austin at Longbridge 

Sadly he never received any 'reject' cars!

 

 

Sadly - fortunately? The reject standard cars had gone to the showrooms. Back in the 70s our family car was a 1300; the boot lid had a tendency to pop open when travelling at 67 mph up the M6. A few years ago there was a BBC drama series about the Birmingham pub bombings. One of the characters was a Longbridge employee; the non-shutting boot on his car was a running gag.

 

On 17/08/2019 at 00:51, Annie said:

There's no LNWR signals at all 

 

That's a pity as they are so distinctive and characterful - enough to put the stamp of the Premier Line on any scene. And of course in a virtual model railway you can safely make them 60ft high! Do the Midland signals have dot in place of stripe? (And the horizontal black stripe on the rear of distant arms.) Irrespective of manufacturer, I trust the pre-grouping distants are red, not yellow.

 

28 minutes ago, Edwardian said:

There was some discussion on Castle Aching about wooden window paint colours.  It was felt that wood was painted in dark colours.  Others pointed out that white lead paint was used, which darkened.

 

I am sure both these assertions are correct, and evidence may be found of them, but Edwardian coloured pictures and paintings also show white window work (and white casements in dark painted frames) were evident.

 

See This post for pictures

 

A snippet to add to this: in Midland Style George Dow records the standard Midland structure colours as ni66er brown and Old Denby pottery cream, window frames being cream - but I'm not convinced that necessarily means sashes were cream. This scheme was used for passenger and goods station buildings and also by the locomotive department. The signal department went its own way with lemon chrome and Venetian red but signalbox widow frames were white - the difference between the white and lemon chrome is clear in period photos.

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47 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

 

Sadly - fortunately? The reject standard cars had gone to the showrooms. Back in the 70s our family car was a 1300; the boot lid had a tendency to pop open when travelling at 67 mph up the M6. A few years ago there was a BBC drama series about the Birmingham pub bombings. One of the characters was a Longbridge employee; the non-shutting boot on his car was a running gag.

 

 

That's a pity as they are so distinctive and characterful - enough to put the stamp of the Premier Line on any scene. And of course in a virtual model railway you can safely make them 60ft high! Do the Midland signals have dot in place of stripe? (And the horizontal black stripe on the rear of distant arms.) Irrespective of manufacturer, I trust the pre-grouping distants are red, not yellow.

 

 

A snippet to add to this: in Midland Style George Dow records the standard Midland structure colours as ni66er brown and Old Denby pottery cream, window frames being cream - but I'm not convinced that necessarily means sashes were cream. This scheme was used for passenger and goods station buildings and also by the locomotive department. The signal department went its own way with lemon chrome and Venetian red but signalbox widow frames were white - the difference between the white and lemon chrome is clear in period photos.

 

Puts me in mind of the GWR.  Prior to 1907 it used 3 "stone" colours, 1-3 running light to dark, and chocolate (especially on signal boxes)for wood-work, with white window frames.

 

 

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The white frames on signal-box windows no doubt stayed white - I suspect no other windows of the period received more thorough and frequent cleaning!

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1907 is the key date for the GWR, as it switched to buying in ready-mixed paint from paint manufacturers.

 

It is worth noting that the manufacture of non-lead-based paints was probably quite rare prior to the coming into force of the Lead Paint (Protection Against Poisoning) Act of 1926. 

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3 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

 

That's a pity as they are so distinctive and characterful - enough to put the stamp of the Premier Line on any scene. And of course in a virtual model railway you can safely make them 60ft high! Do the Midland signals have dot in place of stripe? (And the horizontal black stripe on the rear of distant arms.) Irrespective of manufacturer, I trust the pre-grouping distants are red, not yellow.

 

Some content creators for Trainz still manage to get such details wrong, but before any distant signal is permanently placed on my layouts it's retextured red as it should be.

I have no idea why the LNWR is so ill served in Trainz.  Perhaps with gradually increasing numbers of engines and rolling stock now being made things might change, but I'm not going to hold my breath.

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On 21/08/2019 at 13:47, sem34090 said:

I think the topic of window frame colours was over in Castle Aching some months ago. Certainly when I've seen properties that have been abandoned for what would appear to be a considerable length of time, the window frames appear to have been painted in green or other darker shades.

 

I think it's also to do with what the paints were based on.

Some info on colours

https://www.terracedhouses.co.uk/index5-paint.html

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Posted (edited)

Thanks, all. Some interesting and useful info there. For the Petite Properties kits, I'll probably stick to the white frames provided, especially the more ornate ones. I've yet to find a way to neatly re-colour these. I've tried using pens and pencils but to no avail - any pigment that was left on the acetate simply wiped off when I cleaned off the clear parts. 

 

I am wondering about the possibility of scanning the windows (against a black background) and then trying to print some frames in black or dark blue/green. 

 

Speaking of dark blue/green, I made a start on the second building kit of this batch, a rather lovely shop... This after I finished applying some laser-cut roof tiles I'd made about a year ago and never used. 

 

20190822_215057.jpg.d72533ea6f2cac9bf6ba7e0b62f5b430.jpg

 

I'm especially impressed with the detail of the shop front, which is suitably "fussy", and which will require me to get my calligraphy pens and gold ink out to attempt some signwriting... 

 

20190822_215836.jpg.ae1235e4a7f8fee2b80b433d72af726f.jpg

 

I got home and managed to find my rattle can of slate grey, so gave the roof a quick coat before bed. Not looking too shabby, I think! 

 

20190822_231323.jpg.9a70aa9a37884b9e0d5bda91121c6ce2.jpg

Edited by Skinnylinny
Edited from home to include a shot of the houses with an appropriately coloured roof!
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These kits have definitely kick started my modelling mojo; the weekend before last I started doodling up some parts for a pair of LSWR 42' carriages, which I'd been meaning to produce for a while.

 

Saturday was spent visiting the layout of a club member - not a scale model at all but lots of operational fun with lots of complex trackwork. Several of us were occupied for many hours setting up and solving shunting challenges, while other trains ran around the main ovals. 

 

20190824_194429.jpg.2ca71c509af6d75aeb61d501d7e29b0b.jpg69223990_10156357777117793_8645220282912473088_n.jpg.3338829b6f5bb765e6a95b063515edd5.jpg

 

 

 

This combined with a couple of serendipitous events at work gave me the boost I needed to get the body of the first carriage, a full third, drawn up and cut on Sunday afternoon. 

 

20190825_235322.jpg.d4ed71c1d95fb7dedbda79c568054235.jpg

 

I've not added end details yet, as I struggled to get the spindly beading to cut properly. Next one to be tackled will be a brake third, then some sort of composite. I do have rather a soft spot for the LSWR tricomposites... 

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Things have been fairly quiet on the modelling front recently, but I have managed to get one side of the above LSWR 42' third painted, and have mostly worked out the bits I'll need for the matching brake third. I'm trying to decide on what I want in a train. I think that's all the third-class I need, but what sorts of proportions of 1st-2nd-3rd would be appropriate for an LSWR train in this time period (1900-1910)? Should I be going for a 1st/2nd composite, or a tricompo? Have I already overdone it with 3rd class compartments? I'm assuming I'll want at least a 4-wheeled luggage van, and there's a nice 1881 46' 1st/2nd composite (4x First, 3x Second compartments), or a 28' 6-wheeler 1/2 compo (2 compartments each). So many choices, and it seems like the LSWR liked a nice healthy mixture of coach types in a train.

877055728_LSWR42Coaches.png.40b1258ac88cd8e6ff65eab1edbfb349.png

I know the LBSC set that I'll be using (one of the set trains for the Cranleigh line - Set Train 42) had 10 3rd class compartments, 4 first and 4 second, plus two 6-wheel brakes. I've yet to work out what the SECR train (if one appears) will look like. It would be on the SER section, but I don't know.

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If it's any help, the bogie block sets built for suburban use at that time had either 16 3rd class compartments, 6 2nd, 8 1st, or 17, 6, 7 (4 car sets in both cases)

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That is helpful, thank you. So roughly twice as much 3rd as 1st accommodation, and slightly less 2nd than first? This sounds it should be possible. So with the 12 3rd compartments I have at the moment, 5-6 first and 4-5 second compartments should do it... Sounds like two four- or six-wheelers should do it.

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