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Following on from the diorama start in 2mm FS I've now got a layout on the go.  The original aim in joining the society/starting work was an eventual large layout of Yeoford and Coleford Junction in early BR(S) times, but that really is a long term plan.  The diorama set me to thinking about a small quick-win learning layout on a single 4' x 2'6" board to get started.  From that thought Bosaleck was born.  The premise is basically if the SR had found it's way down one of the Cornwall rivers, somewhere like Fowey and the line had then been incorporated into BR Southern region.  Set in April 1954 (Wolves have just won their first league title) it means any stock I build up can also be used on the eventual Yeoford layout.

Here's the plan so far:

1555749837_Bosaleckv20-1.jpg.3e84464939a3abb6d807863e9dd28f03.jpg

 

This is a TurboCad print with the dxf Templot output inserted as a layer.  Imagine the buildings rising away from the river up a steeply sloped hillside.  Hidden tracks in grey and traverser off to the right.  Just to make life simple(!) I'd like the traverser to be automated and I'm also thinking about having road vehicles that can travel for periods when there's no train movement on the scene.  Oh and single line token, lever frame and working signals.

 

I've made a start on some of the buildings (which are all based on prototypes either from Lime Regis, Clovelly or Fowey) and also some track and will update progress to the current position over the next few days as and when I get time.

 

Thanks for looking 

 

Chris

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Although such a line would have been in the Southern Operating Area in 1954, it would have been in the Western Region for commercial and engineering purposes. 

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Posted (edited)

Dear Chris, isn't Cornwall southern delightful stuff!

 

What's the radius on your single slip? It looks like it could be so tight that only John Greenwood would be able to make it work.

 

Best wishes, 

Edited by MinerChris

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The village will look very good and interesting street views, church on the back scene?

 

Tim

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Becasse - Sadly so in the real world, but let's not open up old sores.....;)

 

MinerChris - My 4mm stuff is East Devon 1930 SR, so I'm an M7 fan, but what sold me on Yeoford was the shear amount of movements with trains (short and long) arriving from all over and stuff being transferred left right and centre.  Plus I'm a sucker for a spam can!  When you look into the SR in Devon/Cornwall you do realise the variety and I agree it's great stuff.

 

The single slip is a B6 with a minimum radius (if I build it to the template!) of 450mm according to Templot.  we'll know soon as it's actually half built as we speak.  It's actually a single and a quarter slip as after the export to TurboCad I added half a trap point as I realised there was nothing stopping an unsignalled move from the front 2 left sidings onto the passenger line.

 

Tim - yes you're at exactly where my thoughts/ideas are (Having seen CF a few times that does not surprise me).  I think the key thing with the buildings is going to be getting the heights/gradients to look right.

 

Cheers

 

Chris

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Next Stage after the plan was more or less finalised was to start work.  As I was using the laser cutter for some other stuff and the track bits I'd ordered were en-route I set about trying a couple of the buildings.  These are all build with card of various thickness.

 

First up was the 3 terrace just above the station.  Trewavas Grocers and Gilmour's Fruit & Veg at either end with a dwelling in the middle.  This block is based on a building towards the top of Broad St in Lime Regis.

 

340299427_Bosaleck20-04-001.jpg.e813e3c970a7967015b26edb0fa71a94.jpg

2041942121_Bosaleck20-04-002.jpg.506729f1566e99819f08deb894a1a92a.jpg

 

Not entirely happy with it yet so I may build it again (the beauty of laser cutting is I can just run off another "kit of parts").  That said I may feel better when it's got the canopies etc for the shops on.

 

169647171_Bosaleck20-04-003.jpg.b04382f895d92932509bbaf615d8cfc2.jpg

This one gives an idea of the gradient of the street.

 

Next up was the 3 story terrace block next door (there will be a flight of steps between the two buildings).  This is based on Dolphin House in Lostwithial St, Fowey but with a step added for my gradients and it contains Rutherford's Newsagents.  There's an article on Wolves' league win (did I mention that already?;)) in the door window and all the magazines/comics are period for 1954.

2037964279_Bosaleck20-04-004.jpg.dd5bd243d91af84c6ea01e25894b75dc.jpg

 

873048536_Bosaleck20-04-005.jpg.a3451659393a62a05753c43800c06cec.jpg

This one is not finished yet as it still needs sills, ridge tiles and some downpipes, plus the shop canopy & sign and the corbel panel hiding the join at first floor level on the two houses.  Bit happier with this one though.  Again ruler to show gradient of street.

 

Whilst building Dolphin House I also made a start on the first of the pointwork as the bits had arrived from the shop - would have been rude to just let them fester in the bag.  As a result building progress has now slowed whilst I switch to the trackwork.

 

Thanks for looking - more updates tomorrow hopefully

 

Cheers

 

Chris

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Some paper windowsills will give you something to hang the weathering off, but maybe I am commenting too soon. 
 

Tim

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Lovely work on the buildings.  Regarding the sector and the storage sidings under the scenery. I wonder if a simple traintable as used by others Modbury is a good example would take little more room than the sector and would allow much better access than hidden  roads.

 

Don 

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Tim - Yes sills are cut out just not fitted yet.  All comments/suggestions are appreciated!  I do love the description of weathering hanging from them - very fitting!

 

Don - Thanks for your comments and suggestion.  The main reason for the sector plate is simply that I've never built an automated one before.  I've done quite a few automated traversers (including Cadhay's P4 one) and also quite a few turntables but for some reason there's never been cause for a sector plate.  What's not shown on the drawing is that there will be a loco traverser at the left end and (electric) uncoupling magnets at each end of each siding so that within the sidings a train can in theory be ran round and readied for departure without stock being handled.

 

The design has (again) evolved from the posted drawing (at least in my head) in that I think it will have 2 roads on the sector plate thus allowing the scene-bound train to be loaded onto one road, before the fiddle yard bound train enters the second road and then it's just a short move to allow the scene-bound train to come on scene, rather than having to wait whilst the fiddle-bound train exits the sector plate and then it is loaded with the scene-bound train.  I hope I've described that so that it makes sense!!!

 

Cheers

 

Chris

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I mentioned in yesterday's post that progress on the buildings had stalled after the trackwork bits arrived.  I decided to start with the straight B6 turnout at the left end of the platform loop, as this seemed the simplest to get into things with.  Unfortunately I did not manage to take any photos during the construction but here's a shot of the turnout and the stub of track that goes immediately to the left of it completed and timbering/sleepers sprayed.

1105929141_Bosaleck20-04-006.jpg.9e94a13cc8ce1ba10d8ad6947089128f.jpg

The three wagons I have go through fine in either direction as do a couple of re-wheeled Maunsell coaches.  Still need to fit the stretchers (although I have now worked out how I'm going to do that).

 

The plain track is Easitrack with a couple of pcb sleepers at each end to facilitate power supply and also for a bit of security!

 

The turnout was built up using the etched chairs.  I found these quite straightforward and very satisfying to use.  Assembly order was as per the Track book (a great book that I bought before I started building P4 track!) starting with the straight stock rail.

 

I'm now onto the single slip/curved turnout to the right of the platform loop, and have taken in-progress pics of this one so will post these in stages going forward if there is interest?

 

Thanks for looking

 

Cheers

 

Chris

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34 minutes ago, CDGfife said:

 

 

I'm now onto the single slip/curved turnout to the right of the platform loop, and have taken in-progress pics of this one so will post these in stages going forward if there is interest?

 

Thanks for looking

 

Cheers

 

Chris


Oh yes please. It will be very nice to see the outcome, especially the single slip and a quarter, with these etched parts. I only wish they had been around when I built the track for Priory Road. 
 

Izzy

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Which side of the slip is only half there. It would seem that you need a double slip. One slip is for  access to the sidings from the head shunt and the other for the run round.

 

Regards Roger

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Roger

 

Thanks for the comment -  it's a single slip giving access to the following:

1- from the loop to either the right hand siding or the main line

2 - from the left front 2 sidings to the main line

3 - from the main line to either the loop or front left sidings

 

Making it a double slip would mean the shunting is easier and I like my operators to have to think!  The main line in will need to be used for a head shunt for the front left sidings.  The starter signal will be close to the bridge meaning single line permission for shunting ahead should only be required very infrequently, although there may well be a signal on that post for that.  It also means that the shunting will need to be complete before the signalman accepts an incoming train (as his clearing point may not be clear!), but that mirrors the pressure of the real thing.

 

This one is actually now a single and a quarter slip because I've added a single point blade to the nearside stock rail which will be enough to derail anything that tries to move from the left front 2 sidings to the main line without the road set, thereby fulfilling the trap point to passenger line requirement.  It also makes it an interesting and unusual bit of formation.

 

Cheers

 

Chris

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Next instalment of progress on Bosaleck.  A start was made on the single slip.

 

First off the templot template was printed and stuck to the piece of plate glass I keep for track pieces and loco chassis building.  The plot was marked up with highlighting for slide chairs and check chairs (see the later photos for this) plus where the power connections go and where the isolation gaps in the timbering need to be.  Then the timbering (and a few sleepers) was gapped and stuck down with pritt stick.

184244459_Bosaleck20-04-007.jpg.bf2fe1deeb4e7e9025bdcaa886c39ac5.jpg

Next the gap grooves were filled with squadron putty - lots of ventilation required. You can also see the holes drilled for track power connection on this photo. 

1511131664_Bosaleck20-04-008.jpg.cb7e45f4952e8b5ce596e8552fe7ca2d.jpg

The squadron was given overnight to fully harden and then sanded down.  I used a fairly rough sandpaper and sanded along the timbering.  This has the added benefit of imparting wood grain like scratches onto the copperclad, which cannot be seen in any of the photos but I know it's there!!!

 

The first stock rail was then cut to length and curved so that it lay unfixed in about the right shape.  I'm not going to go into how I made up the chairs as I followed Laurie Adams method as per his article in the 2mm magazine, using the jig and finding it pretty straightforward.  First off I made up a couple of slide chairs and a few standard chairs.  Offcuts of the chair etch surround were then used at the heel end and in the middle to keep the rail level (and at the right height) whilst the first chair was attached at the toe end. (the etch bits were obviously too untidy for the photographer but you can see how the rail is bent to lie naturally to shape!!)

396533044_Bosaleck20-04-009.jpg.9b512dfc307f4cef701f454ca948bd2c.jpg

Chairs were then added at around 4-5 timber spacings carefully positioning the rail on the curve of the template.  Once at the other end (and fortunately not having soldered in a standard chair where a check or slide should be!!) it was back to the toe end and filling in the gaps over 3 or 4 passes.  End result for the day was as below:

624061962_Bosaleck20-04-010.jpg.ffc5b60d48117fa9536b2e5a1c9d4ac9.jpg

So there we are with the first rail fitted (alright it was one of the easy ones!).  The gap in chair fixing has been left to allow positioning of the blade before chairs are added.

 

I should also have added that I drilled 2no 0.6mm holes in the web of the rail between slide chairs 1&2 and 3&4 ready for the actuator wires.  This is a habit from my P4 building as it guards against the blade lifting.  More later on that.

 

Thanks for looking

 

Cheers

 

Chris

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Another coffee break - another update!

 

Next the first crossing was filed and assembled.  These are all 1:6 and I used a 2mm Association filing jig and also the assembly jig to put them together.  I soldered this one together in the jig using 0.6mm wire in the gaps between the timbering (you can see one poking out just to the left of the V) before I realised that the obvious way of doing it would be to use the appropriate sized Versaline plate in line with the timbering!!  The assembled crossing was then gauged from the stock rail using a combination of roller, triangle and button gauges (wish I'd got the latter in P4 - they are surprisingly useful) and soldered in.  It's still just placed in the photo - I like to ensure that assemblies will lie more or less in their allotted place before I solder as I think it gives a better chance of the final alignment being more accurate.

1052179952_Bosaleck20-04-011.jpg.f5c6b84ffb0c397e404d89068e8444f8.jpg

Here's the wider view (the 20p was placed so my East of Scotland 4mm friends could appreciate the difference in scale!!) with some soldering of chairs now started.

1474055946_Bosaleck20-04-012.jpg.21baa2a074de55fe5b1caff679bd0d81.jpg

Next up was the point blade/closure assembly.  I've almost always done these as one unit before (Sorry CaleyJim - no loose heeling here!!) and elected to do so again here.  After filing up the toe end, the slightly over long rail was cut to length (remembering to gap it from the crossing) and then offered up so I could mark for 2no 0.4mm holes in the web to match the two that were drilled in the stock rail (as discussed last time).  Small lengths of 0.4mm nickel silver wire were soldered into these so that they would protrude through the stock rail holes.  This is a long standing habit I've had as they prevent the blades from lifting and I will use the other end for attaching stretcher bars.  You can see them in this shot.

You can also see why I left the 5 un-chaired timbers when I fixed the stock rail - as well as not creating obstruction to the smooth lie of the blade, I wanted to see how the blade will naturally move before deciding on which chairs or half chairs to fit here.

972997282_Bosaleck20-04-013.jpg.c64dacdfcf43a980d936175de8a1c0f9.jpg

The closure rail/blade was fixed carefully to the template line and eyed in down the length to ensure no dog-leg at the joint to the crossing, and a nice smooth curve.

 

Finally a wider image showing the closure rail/blade now in place.  In the background is the opposite blade which was filed at the same time.  You can see how long I first cut it just in case I messed up the blade filing!!

516880197_Bosaleck20-04-014.jpg.1efa129649465c485ce404592ea2dd46.jpg

 

 

As I've moved through this formation I've refined the wire detail so I'm now folding it to 90degrees prior to soldering into the blade.  More pics showing that will come in later updates.

 

Thanks for looking

 

Cheers

 

Chris 

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Next instalment.

 

First up was the fitting of the far side stock rail as far as the gap to the crossing.  I did this first as it allowed un-impinged gauge access (without the far side blade/closure rail fitted) from the nearside blade/closure rail and also once in I could mark the blade against it for the web hole/wire locations.  Once that was tacked in by a few chairs, the blade/closure rail for that side was cut to size and fitted by gauging off the nearside stock rail (not forgetting to drill the web holes and solder in the wires for the movement/stretchers).

420025434_Bosaleck20-04-015.jpg.332c2fff8560daad3fb3702684733b83.jpg

Here's a close up of both sides just needing their stretcher bars

1657234925_Bosaleck20-04-016.jpg.6aae58e275ef89788c2e865f72f6655c.jpg

Next the return curving stock rail and double bladed first side of the nearside K were worked up.  Again the stock rail was curved to lie in more or less the right position before fixing.  This shot shows it fixed by a few chairs and the double blade dropped in (the fret is there to support it at the right level) to check fit and alignment. 

1070780335_Bosaleck20-04-017.jpg.d2839a63200b967f09bc146ec22f1e77.jpg

What I'm looking for is the continuation of the line from the crossing vee on the left and the template track on the right.  This is checked by looking along the lines to ensure no dog-leg.  This is the tightest radius on the whole layout so needs to be carefully and evenly fixed in line with the template!

20318834_Bosaleck20-04-018.jpg.b81951e9e4e5105cb2aaed19b6998e25.jpg

So that's another little sub-assembly or two chalked off.  I've always found it easiest to break formations down into small sub-assemblies - I think the hardest part of pointwork building is doing the assemblies in the right order!!!

 

With the slip area approaching I took some time to work out exactly how to do the stretchers, particularly where they need to cross under closure rails within the slip, so that's what will follow next.

 

Thanks for looking

 

Cheers

 

Chris

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I find your method of drilling the rail to fit connections to the stretchers. I have read of this being done in 7mm where it also prevents horrizontal movement as well as the blade lifting. So far I have always cheated by using someting soldered to the base of the blade which prevents the blade lifting but does not stop horrizontal movement. I assume the wires will extend beyond the stock rails I wonder  if this is less obtrusive perhaps a trial is in order.

 

Don

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So after a welcome conversation with Izzy re wheel flanges and clearances (more in a minute) I did realise I should have made it clear with this thread that I'm posting for a few reasons:

  • It makes a great record of what has been achieved and documents the history of the layout
  • I am relatively new to 2mm FS and I certainly found when starting in P4 that putting regular updates up produced lots of encouragement, advise & comment regarding things to look out for from more experienced modellers working to those standards
  • Pictures and words showing what and how can be helpful to others who may be on the verge of or considering starting something

With that in mind I'd like to be clear that I welcome comments and questions on this thread with regard to what I'm doing, so please feel free to put forward such comments/advise in a positive manner (and appreciating I may reserve the right to not pay heed and learn from my own mistakes! ;)). 

 

Now to the stretcher bars and the usual issue of "it would be easiest to solder with metal but metal has that nasty conductive electrickery thing" [in P4 land my mate Jim McKenzie will be saying "that's why you need radio controlled battery operation" as usual!].  The first iteration (and this photo is the turnout off the running line at the right hand end of the loop) was to cut a small strip of 20 thou plasticard to act as a stretcher.  To this I plastic welded some small angle to give a flat base through which to drill for the actuator wire (which will be servo driven via a horizontal actuator through a small baseboard hole)  A 0.4mm hole was drilled in each end of the stretcher bar to fit over the (now bent to 90degree) wire from the blades at the correct spacing to keep the blade tips in the right place. The stretcher was manoeuvred into place, the angle plasticwelded in situ and then the stretcher/wire interface fixed with a tiny dab of cyano.  This photo shows the idea:

24161056_Bosaleck20-04-019.jpg.c0159d43310a5a521e2043705952c83f.jpg

I wasn't that happy with it as although I suspect once everything is painted and weathered it will be less obtrusive it still looks a bit chunky to me, so next I set about using some acrylic clear (actually from a Farish box) - think I saw this in either the Track book or on a thread here somewhere.  The other stretcher in the pic above shows how that came out - a lot better, however I can't plasticweld the angle to it so if I go for this route on all the stretchers on straightforward turnouts I'll need to engineer another way of getting the movement to the stretcher.  It might be as simple as a piece of rodding moving horizontally via a through-baseboard hole under some dummy cranks outside of the 4foot - not sure yet.

 

For the slip it was more complicated as the stretcher needed to pass underneath a closure rail at each end (in fact two at one end).  I was worried that a cut-down acrylic stretcher would not be stong/resilient enough and also a pain (if at all possible) to fit, so I've compromised with the following method.  It uses a strip of 20 thou and some 1.2mm plastic angle:

1615291718_Bosaleck20-04-022.jpg.1cd4c126984af78b96d0b71d0d626015.jpg

The strip of 20 thou was pushed under the rails and small lengths of angle drilled 0.4mm to attach to the wire from the blades.  With the blades in the right place the angles were plasticwelded down to the 20 thou strip.  This could be achieved in other ways (metal and epoxy for example) but I did like the fact that I can spill the plasticweld all over and it will still only fix the angle to the strip as there's nothing else plastic there!!!  Here's the first end of the slip with the 2 angles showing and the gap left for the closure rail

221415074_Bosaleck20-04-020.jpg.e76b9a8295cd2b8b64cdb8639d70ec4a.jpg

Here's the other end

413170559_Bosaleck20-04-021.jpg.39fb12c927c4f145a56bc2c0222832b4.jpg

 

Izzy was rightly concerned about wheel clearance with the wire set halfway down the rail and a 0.5mm wheel flange.  This was an issue that I had encountered the first time I tried a wagon through the first set of point blades I made and an example of what works in P4 not automatically working in 2mm!  I needed to take a small needle file to the top of the wire just adjacent to the blade to clear a deep enough path to allow the wheel flange not to be lifted.  You can just see the signs of the file on the wire in the middle of this shot (sorry about the focus!):

1225009777_Bosaleck20-04-023.jpg.9a8886dfcba3c2a3779494f94991466c.jpg

Subsequently I have been drilling the holes towards the bottom of the web of the rail which has meant that (apart from the one I drilled inaccurately!) not much fettling with the file has been required.  The top blade in this photo shows the clearance when you get the hole in the right place!  You should be able to tell that this one is the latest one I did - you always get to the standard you want with the last one you do!!!

 

This also brings up another point, which is that I always have a wagon or two to hand so that as soon as something is tacked in I can try a wagon through it.  Much easier to move/tweak a rail when it's only anchored in a few places or change a plan when you're not all the way in!!  On the subject of tweaking, I've found the etch chairs really easy to adjust if required - applying the tip of the iron to the timber adjacent to the chair and levering the chair/track with ceramic tipped tweezers.

 

The last 3 photos are a little out of sequence with the main build as I took them to show the stretchers.

 

Apologies for the length of this post and back to progress next time!

 

Also Don - your post crossed with me writing this so hopefully this gives you a bit more insight?  I'm certainly pleased with the blade stability and movement so far (notwithstanding the comments above).

 

Thanks for looking

 

Cheers

 

Chris

 

 

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Yes I did like the explanation. In pre-group days the strecher bars were round. I have been thinking about using a  fine wooden rod ( my father in law had a box of them from the chemist which could be ideal then crimp a couple of small brass tubes onto the rod and solder the blades to them. A plastic rod would be little use as you couldn't solder the blades to the brass. Previously I have tended to use a moving sleeper either PCB or a wooden one with brass pins to take the solder.

 

No need to apologise for the length of the post better that you put in all the information rather than people having to keep asking questions because someone looking though later can find it all in one place.

 

Don

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After having worked out a plan (or two) for the stretchers it was back to the track assemblies.  Next up was the opposing Vee which was filed and made up using the 2mm Assoc jigs.  The Vee was tacked in, gauged off the nearside Vee with careful alignment for the siding road off the template.  Once tacked in I did realise I'd left a rather large isolation gap! 

1295059132_Bosaleck20-04-024.jpg.1dfa0f15024687e9574377c7c4777f6c.jpg

I could have done this Vee before the first part of the K but my thinking was that with the K blades in place I have the option of using a triangle gauge if I want.  The beauty of button, roller and triangle gauges is there is generally one you can find to fit a circumstance.

257607973_Bosaleck20-04-025.jpg.61e01878f7694c0bc215806809bec28e.jpg

Once the Vee was in I moved on to the first of the closure rails within the slip (here my lack of terminology is going to let me down!).  I filed the point of this as a 1:6 using the jig then cut it carefully to put the point in the right place using the template (although in the knowledge that I might need to tweak this).  It was tacked in gauged off the opposite K blade.

1406812117_Bosaleck20-04-026.jpg.4f4a5b8b79562706a3bd90c4d9fc9dca.jpg

Next was the adjacent closure rail, with similar (but mirrored) point.  This was gauged off the opposite K blade but also a straight edge was used off the first closure rail to make sure the point was I the right place relative to that rail.  Once a couple of chairs/plates were tacked in the straight edge was again used along the latest closure rail to check clearance to the first one.

1258166819_Bosaleck20-04-027.jpg.f04bbf8f8f4642a1215db8e04608e652.jpg

By this time I was using the Versaline chair plates to solder in rail through the crossings where a standard or check chair could not be used.  Just a matter of fishing out the correct length and going back when everything is in to fit a half standard chair on the outside.

1182110168_Bosaleck20-04-028.jpg.41f13b5b04e317f57879c6589c4a6086.jpg

Starting to look like what it's going to be!

 

 

Thanks for looking

 

cheers

 

Chris

 

 

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I wouldn't worry too much about the wide insulation gap.  My experience is that as long as there is good horizontal alignment and smooth ends to the rails, stock will cope with that, though there might be a slight 'bump' as wheels go over it.  Not un-prototypical in a yard setting.

 

Jim

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Thanks for the re-assurance Jim,

 

So far the stock seems to get over it ok with just a small bump.  If it annoys me in the end I guess I could fill and file with plastic if it comes to the worst.  As you say track was rarely actually perfect especially in yards!

 

Cheers

 

CDG

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I think I would remove some of the rail towards the V, and graft in a new piece, maybe 1cm long, leaving two small gaps.

 

You probably already know that the Association roller gauges are also 9.42mm diameter, so they can be used end-on like the button gauges. I have found that useful on several occasions.

 

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Thanks Ian, yes that would be quite easy to do.  Not sure why I didn't think of that way of solving it!!  This is the beauty of posting stuff.  We'll see how I feel about it once I've had chance to think on it and go from there.

 

I do like Freshwater by the way.

 

Cheers

 

Chris

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Next up was the small V check rail inside the far K, soldered to the Versaline plates.  It was gauged off the nearside blade/closure assembly

1982068093_Bosaleck20-04-029.jpg.855c7208b0bae5e705ae08597c9b37ec.jpg

Following this was the curved double blade, gauged off the nearside stock rail.  It took 2 goes at this as the first one was cut one timber too short.  Stupidly I didn't check fit it before I nicely filed 2 perfect blade chamfers!!  Second one wasn't too long in the making and at least I can re-use most of the rail on the first one for check rails etc

366842731_Bosaleck20-04-030.jpg.bb63250c040a357382bbfcccdea063ea.jpg

Next to be fitted was the last of the Vees.  Again filed and assembled using the Association jigs and carefully aligned and gauged from the nearside stock rail.  By this time I was using the versaline plates to fix the assembly in the jig so t was simply a case of planting, gauging and carefully soldering to the timbering:

1453137006_Bosaleck20-04-031.jpg.eba468ce5adb938d90b8ecfc6c89c734.jpg

Finally (for this update) the nearside closure rails were fitted using straight edges and the template as described for the other side pair.

1018714503_Bosaleck20-04-032.jpg.ab45c73f63865a22a68b7dde0a09b6ea.jpg

This then allows me to gauge to the far side stock rail/trap point.

 

Thanks for looking

 

Cheers

 

Chris

 

  • Like 8
  • Craftsmanship/clever 2

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