Jump to content

Modelling Track Buried in stone


Recommended Posts

Hi,

 

I’m having trouble in finding a solution to modelling track that has been buried in stone, dust sand etc that is found around an aggregate terminal as well as the surrounding ground to blend it all in.

 

I’ve tried the Chris Nevard method of DAS Modelling Clay, but I simply can’t get anywhere near the same results, so I’m looking for an alternative.’

 

What suggestions do people have?
 

Simon

Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the crude but effective method of sinking the track into the clay, plaster, or whatever medium you are modelling the ground surface in, and, before it dries but while it is stiff enough not to 'slump' back into it's original position, run an old wagon with coarse scale wheels through it a few times to create a flangeway for stock to run in.  Old Triang, Hornby Dublo, and similar wheelsets will cut a flangeway deep enough for modern stock to run properly in and allow sufficient width for locos to pick up current from the railheads.  The last part of the operation, after painting the ground surface, is to polish off the tops of the railheads. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold
5 hours ago, PMP said:

I’d suggest to re-try Chris’s technique, it is very effective, but does need a little practice to perfect.

C8D835ED-745E-4FE2-93E4-3CCF50940EAC.jpeg.36b1b66a2ae3d1b9c810805512080098.jpeg

and quite often the initial result looks better than you think when its painted, weathered and a bit of vegetation added...

Chris

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

 

https://ferreteria.es/tapagrietas-pasta-ligera-liteplast-750-ml.html?gclid=Cj0KCQiAwf39BRCCARIsALXWETwG81QgfHPxjCP4NhLnw5rncMXwYYm77iFKZP6zeG6eTGuPRnzyQTMaAkZqEALw_wcB

 

Apologies for the local page, but I can't get on with DAS either, so I use this which I find easier to lay and more workable when dry.

 

Mike.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Enterprisingwestern said:

 

Apologies for the local page, but I can't get on with DAS either, so I use this which I find easier to lay and more workable when dry.

 

Mike.

With the DAS method you work it whilst it’s wet. The only time I’ve needed to work it when dry was using it as concrete 

D1BDF2ED-B082-44F6-9B2A-C32A1584AFA3.jpeg.839097c79963ec688827fd591d7f8fa5.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold
Just now, PMP said:

With the DAS method you work it whilst it’s wet. The only time I’ve needed to work it when dry was using it as concrete 

D1BDF2ED-B082-44F6-9B2A-C32A1584AFA3.jpeg.839097c79963ec688827fd591d7f8fa5.jpeg

 

That's why I prefer my method Paul, takes away the pressure of time element, but, as always, each to their own, it obviously works very well in yours and Chris's hands!

I was also aware of the need to keep the weight down on Span Yard for airline baggage purposes when the layout came over to the UK for exhibitions (oh how we laughed), so was also looking at it from a slightly different angle.

 

Mike.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Mike, you can increase the time element by either adding water, or shortening it with additional heat such as a hairdryer. The weight I’ve not found a significant issue, as it dries it loses quite a bit of its mass.
E60689FF-6706-40D5-9F30-1D21719D2849.jpeg.0bca81823518f0ae1d9e9f9b3a02fd8f.jpeg

 

Once dry, like any similar medium it is susceptible to cracking if flexed significantly. You do need to let it dry properly which can be a couple of days depending on relative humidity, and temperature.

 

  • Like 1
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

Chris Nevard has a short video on Instagram showing his technique;

 

https://www.instagram.com/p/CFwj-YAHn0g/?utm_source=ig_web_button_share_sheet

 

and a write up on his blog;

 

http://nevardmedia.blogspot.com/2011/08/creating-effect-of-ash-ballast.html

Edited by Wellyboots
  • Thanks 1
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 28/11/2020 at 14:11, Wellyboots said:

Chris Nevard has a short video on Instagram showing his technique;

 

https://www.instagram.com/p/CFwj-YAHn0g/?utm_source=ig_web_button_share_sheet

 

and a write up on his blog;

 

http://nevardmedia.blogspot.com/2011/08/creating-effect-of-ash-ballast.html


Hi,

 

Thanks , when I contacted Chris initially he only sent a flow chart picture through, so the blog post detail is a great help, gave me a couple of details I was missing on my test piece!

 

I also found that the end of the slab clay I was using had dried a bit, where as stuff in the middle was nice and squishy and mouldable.

 

So, I’ve taken the plunge and tried the method on the layout for real, I’ll try painting it tomorrow!

 

Simon

Link to post
Share on other sites

I used clay, mushed in some pva to give it flexibility and applied using a brush. Cleared the inside of the rails with a screwdriver. Then painted it and covered it with dustings of weathering powders.

 

More pics can be found on my layout Jencaster. 

 

Not stone as such but texture can be added as necessary using sand, ballast etc.

20190325_070613_resized.jpg

 

20190318_070908.jpg

20180515_070919.jpg

Edited by ianLMS
  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.