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Pre-war and wartime road vehicles


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The Russian staff cars that I mentioned are very similar. Item # 310267877821 on e-bay.

 

Ah yes Phil that one is perfect for Bonnie and Clyde's last stand as they had a 1934 Ford V8 4 door sedan!

 

Must get one of those!

 

Agree with you about the Austin 18 ambulance just got mine and its a cracker, even if it didnt want to come off the screws on the baseplate!

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Ah yes Phil that one is perfect for Bonnie and Clyde's last stand as they had a 1934 Ford V8 4 door sedan!

 

Must get one of those!

 

Agree with you about the Austin 18 ambulance just got mine and its a cracker, even if it didnt want to come off the screws on the baseplate!

If you get one they come with alternative grill and bonnets, but the etched brass bits are only for the one illustrated on the box. The body is the 1934 Ford, the press tools were sold to the Russians. The one illustrated is the earlier model hence the two grills. The Russians only had the Ford body, the front ends were a copy of the contemporary International Harvester light trucks and they used an engine copied from Dodge.

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If you get one they come with alternative grill and bonnets, but the etched brass bits are only for the one illustrated on the box. The body is the 1934 Ford, the press tools were sold to the Russians. The one illustrated is the earlier model hence the two grills. The Russians only had the Ford body, the front ends were a copy of the contemporary International Harvester light trucks and they used an engine copied from Dodge.

 

So if it was say parked in a side street pointing away from view, so you only saw the rear and part of the side, to all intents it would pass as a 30s Ford! Are the alternative grill and bonnet more utilitarian?

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So if it was say parked in a side street pointing away from view, so you only saw the rear and part of the side, to all intents it would pass as a 30s Ford! Are the alternative grill and bonnet more utilitarian?

Quite the opposite! I think the trader has the one with the later grill in stock. The IH light trucks were imported into the UK during the thirties. What I am considering doing is cutting off the car body behind the front doors and fitting a lorry or van body to the chassis.

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So if it was say parked in a side street pointing away from view, so you only saw the rear and part of the side, to all intents it would pass as a 30s Ford! Are the alternative grill and bonnet more utilitarian?

Here is a bit about the IH trucks, just go to the third item 'delivery trucks' then go to page 12. >>

http://www.wisconsin...mick/trucks.asp

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I.m modelling a country branchline terminus circa 1946 and would like to see a model of a milk tanker produced. I understand these vehicles travelled to the local farms to collect the milk, which they then delivered to the goods yard. They were able to pump the milk directly into the six wheel rail tanks.

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I.m modelling a country branchline terminus circa 1946 and would like to see a model of a milk tanker produced. I understand these vehicles travelled to the local farms to collect the milk, which they then delivered to the goods yard. They were able to pump the milk directly into the six wheel rail tanks.

The Base Toys Albion tanker would be ideal for what you want. Just add the necessary transfers etc.

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That is a breakdown/recovery vehicle. London Transport used a similar type of gear fitted to the ex LS type buses.

 

Looks like its based on an old gantry crane variant http://ccmv.fotopic.net/p65101116.html (with the gantry crane removed and a breakdown jib added at the back) so if anyone still has their Airfix Magazines from 1970/71 (like me) they will also have the plans (for the gantry variant) to build one from!!

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Motorcycles and 3 Wheelers.

Some motorbikes were designed specifically for sidecars such as the Ariel Square four and BSA V-twin. The Sunbeam was even designed exclusively for sidecars. There was about four different passenger sidecars, the open single seater was the simplest followed by an enclosed coupe' version. Next was the saloon version that could hold up to 4 persons and then the 'family' type some of which could seat 7! The only limiting factor was a weight limit of 8 cwt (896lbs) which also applied to 3 wheeled cars and vans. With two or three motorcycles and four sidecars a manufacturer could come up with plenty of (motorcycle) combinations. The earliest Reliant 3 wheelers had the front wheel and forks exposed like a motorbike, this followed on from the Raleigh 3 wheel vans which had the same arrangement. Raleigh also made the 'Super Seven' which was similar to the post war Reliant 3 wheelers. Most 3 wheel cars were like the Morgan with a single wheel at the back, the only other significant make was BSA which had the distinction of being front wheel drive. I would like to see some motorcycle and/or sidecars produced as well as the Raleigh vans and Morgan 3 wheeler.

 

Definitely- that's a major gap in what's currently available- and not just for the pre-war/wartime period. A core range of 2/3 different popular bikes of the era with a variety of sidecars would definitely fit the bill. With a bit of clever tooling design it ought to be possible to mix 'n' match different combinations of bike & chair.

 

Morgan and BSA 3-wheelers? Yes please to both

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Definitely- that's a major gap in what's currently available- and not just for the pre-war/wartime period. A core range of 2/3 different popular bikes of the era with a variety of sidecars would definitely fit the bill. With a bit of clever tooling design it ought to be possible to mix 'n' match different combinations of bike & chair.

 

Morgan and BSA 3-wheelers? Yes please to both

I would suggest the following:- Motorcycles Ariel square four, Sunbeam (two cylinders inline, shaft drive) and a BSA V-twin. All three were intended for use with sidecars. There is at least four different types of passenger sidecars + some commercial 'box' types that were used by the GPO, AA and RAC.
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A little more information:

 

http://www.derelictp...ead.php?t=16405

 

 

Scroll down, and you will find a 1948 photo (apologies to Phil for breach of timeline!) of Seaton Junction forecourt, showing the lorry fleet belonging to Express Dairies. Flatbacks, and churns can be seen. I am sure that this was typical. If you particularly want a GWR connection, then there was at one time an Aplin and Barrett creamery at Yeovil, which shipped its products from the GWR bay at Yeovil Town.

 

Thanks for going to the trouble of supplying all this information which is facinating. Given the very rural setting for my terminus I probably will do a rethink on a road tanker!

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Definitely- that's a major gap in what's currently available- and not just for the pre-war/wartime period. A core range of 2/3 different popular bikes of the era with a variety of sidecars would definitely fit the bill. With a bit of clever tooling design it ought to be possible to mix 'n' match different combinations of bike & chair.

 

Morgan and BSA 3-wheelers? Yes please to both

 

 

Have a look at some of these .

 

http://www.autocraft.plus.com/

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What I am considering doing is cutting off the car body behind the front doors and fitting a lorry or van body to the chassis.

 

That happend quite alot in order to get around some sort of petrol rationing rule - light vans and farm vehicles were exempted so lots of 4 door saloons became pick ups or vans overnight. There are 2 on the farm where I keep my cars. The ones I have seen are very "rural" and "hill-billy" - plank sides covered with creosote or any paint that they got their hands on.. Because the MOT didn't arrive until 1960, these things would be kept on the road well into the 50s - cars were a heck of a lot easier to mend in those days.

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A bit like running your diesel today on heating oil or cooking oil with a small diesel supply to start it and heat the mainifold. But I digress.

 

My tuppence worth - lots and lots of motorcycles and optional "chairs" as well please.

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It seems that motorcycles are the one item that people want. Apart from some military kits from Airfix and Fijumi that contain motorcycles there is nothing else besides some expensive white metal kits. For more modern applications some of the motorbikes from Micro-Machines are about OO scale.

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  • 1 month later...

Just a heads up guys, the latest Oxford Diecast list has AEC Matador (Army and Wynns wrecker), RAF David Brown tractors (presumably as in the old Airfix Stirling kit), an Armstrong Siddeley Hurricane and Bedford MW's coming up.

 

Lets hope the wheels/tyres are correct on this Matador!

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Hello wamwig, many thanks for this advance intelligence.

 

Can you please advise if there is a website (and link) to the source? I have just scanned the Oxford site (as at this morning) and cannot find reference to Matador, DB tractor, and MW. If these are to the better standards that are now the norm, then timtayshun will be overwhelming. :)

 

PB

 

Hi Peter

 

Time Tunnel Models have them on their website, other dealers may also have them

 

http://www.goldstarstockists.com/therest/oxford.htm

 

Hope that helps

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Hello again WW.

 

Yes, a very great help. Also somewhat overwhelmed in anticipation of what is on offer; I just hope that their manufacturing asset does not let them (or us) down. Perhaps Pocketbond will match these new items. I find it almost impossible to conclude a preference of one over t'other; so my display cabinet is getting samples from both.

 

As an aside, there is and has long been a glut of aviation models of popular warbirds in 1:72. So it seems odd to me that a new range of aviation subjects aimed at a disciplined 1:76 market, should opt for something noticeably out-of-scale. Even so, that little Tiger Moth will be irresistable, and I feel some relief that they (Oxford) are not producing a full range of 1:76 warbirds.

 

PB

 

Hi Peter

 

Glad to be of help

 

Indeed, the Matador artists impression certainly looks promising in the wheel dept! Hmm think I might need to get a new display unit with all these new releases from Oxford (Austin ATV, Bedford WLG and now Matador and Bedford MW), looks like Ikea here I come! Strangely while Oxford are pushing on with their ranges Pocketbond seem to have slowed down of late, as do Base Toys!

 

I've found the Dragon Rapide irresistable and have ordered it, but then I do have quite a few aircraft as well although luckily I have already covered most subjects in plastic.

 

WW

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  • 1 year later...

Here is my wish-list. To my knowledge, none of these are produced as either diecast models or kits in 1/76. There ae a few luxury cars, but the every day saloons are the most useful:

 

Armstrong Siddeley 18 HP Malvern Saloon, 1927

Austin 16 Saloon, 1928

Bean 11.9 Tourer, 1925

Bentley, 6.5 litre Speed Six Tourer, 1930

Clyno Royal Saloon, 1926

Ford Model T Sedan, 1925

Hillman Minx, Light 6 Saloon, 1932

Humber 16/50 Saloon, 1930

Jowett 7 Long Saloon, 1929

Jowett 7 Short Saloon, 1930

Rolls Royce, Phantom I, 1929

Rover Light 6 Saloon, 1929

Rover 10 Saloon, 1933

Singer Junior Saloon, 1928

Singer Junior Tourer, 1928

Singer Junior Saloon, 1931

Standard 9 Saloon, 1927

Standard 10 Saloon, 1933

Star 20/50 6 Stella Saloon, 1926

Star Comet Saloon, 1932

Swift 10 Saloon, 1930

Triumph Super 7 Saloon, 1930

Vauxhall Cadet Saloon, 1930

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1 item strangely missing from the Oxford diecast mechanical horse range is the LMS van trailer. All the other companies trailers have been produced but not the LMS one. I did contact them last year and they said they would consider it but nothing yet!

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I could say yes please to any one from your list.

 

Thanks, if I can work out how to make a decent model of a pre-war car, you'll be the first to know!

 

Although Austins seems to have pre-dominated in terms of sheer volume, there were so many domestic marques in the '20s and '30s that the variety seems almost endless. I'd love to represent them all with 1 or 2 models each. Who wouldn't want a Clyno or a Singer?

 

I'd love to do short production runs of some of these, because for those who want to add further variety to their street scenes, they would provide that extra layer of depth and distinctiveness.

 

Any views on colours? I never know whether you can trust the colour scheme of a restored car. Early colour films seem full of Fordian black, but contemporary adverts tend to show the cars in colour. Blues and wine reds seem the most popular schemes, with the more expensive models and versions often sporting balck roofs and pillars with coloured bodies (perhaps still harking back to cariage painting in the horse drawn era). Even a top of the range Austin 7 would get this treatment.

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