Jump to content
Pixie

Any Question Answered

Recommended Posts

The 2mm journal has a series running from Nov 1962 to March 1963 on building a West Country Pacific - clearly things have moved on a good deal since then but the model appears to be quite fine, and I am interested in trying to mimic the process with a few modern substitutions (such as association axle bearings, PCB frame spacers, etc.):

 

image.png.fb51a85f523ab83773a34e031a3ec076.png

 

Part 1 http://www.2mm.org.uk/membersonly/backnumbers/1960s/1962/Nov1962.pdf#page=16

Part 2 http://www.2mm.org.uk/membersonly/backnumbers/1960s/1963/Jan1963.pdf#page=14

Part 3 http://www.2mm.org.uk/membersonly/backnumbers/1960s/1963/Mar1963.pdf#page=18

(all of these links are password protected, do not fear!)

 

Any thoughts (whether they are to encourage or dissuade) would be appreciated!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

There is a wonderful story about the locos that Les Brown made, told to me by Ian Pusey.  There was a get together of modellers in London and the MN was also accompanied by a Schools class from Les.  Both performed well individually, but when they ran in opposite directions on parallel tracks the two tenders clapped together because of the massive magnets contained therein.  At that point it was decided that the future prospects for 2mm modelling might be curtailed.
 

Tim

Edited by CF MRC
  • Like 2
  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The pacific and the Schools are currently in my care along with a lovely rake of Bulleid coaches which are very much of their time with shaped Perspex sides with paper overlays and obechi floors. As far as I'm aware the Schools still has its original motor which I believe is from a Triang rocket but the MN has a more modern one although I've not investigated fully as yet. I 

 

Jerry

 

D139232FFBEA45FCBBE0B7BC62BEE710.jpg.2630c636904b927e75a821d62e1215a2.jpg4C4803FC7B9D4B8494B1AB0C79A2F656.jpg.83c6131f47a139ea21e2e706c5648e54.jpgB097292831C949B8971C2C04DDC94E4E.jpg.409ef411b1367d907206455492f42476.jpg

  • Like 8
  • Craftsmanship/clever 1
  • Friendly/supportive 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, who'd have thought!?  Lovely to see, for sure - and even in the sunshine livery too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I had a go at making this up this evening. I just dove in and didn’t really think about it. Now that I’m thinking about it I’m wondering if the steps are on the right side (is there a trick to tell or do I just look in a reference book). I’m also wondering how you fix the roof, I’ve soldered it now. But there is no base. At the time I thought the roof would be more difficult hence I done that part first. This is a worsley works etch, no instructions or pictures of it complete from my extensive searching.

 

any tips appreciated, and the first time I’ve soldered a coach... so be kind.. 

358C4AE2-C011-4CF0-BB7A-E8F51E50A4CB.jpeg

  • Like 2
  • Craftsmanship/clever 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, garygfletcher said:

So I had a go at making this up this evening. I just dove in and didn’t really think about it. Now that I’m thinking about it I’m wondering if the steps are on the right side (is there a trick to tell or do I just look in a reference book). I’m also wondering how you fix the roof, I’ve soldered it now. But there is no base. At the time I thought the roof would be more difficult hence I done that part first. This is a worsley works etch, no instructions or pictures of it complete from my extensive searching.

 

any tips appreciated, and the first time I’ve soldered a coach... so be kind.. 

 

 

Looks fine Gary. Worsley coaches are designed to be similar to Comet kits, generic instructions for these can be found here

https://www.engelsmodelspoor.shop/media/pdfs/Building Coaches the Comet Way.pdf

 

Jerry

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, garygfletcher said:

So I had a go at making this up this evening. I just dove in and didn’t really think about it. Now that I’m thinking about it I’m wondering if the steps are on the right side (is there a trick to tell or do I just look in a reference book). I’m also wondering how you fix the roof, I’ve soldered it now. But there is no base. At the time I thought the roof would be more difficult hence I done that part first. This is a worsley works etch, no instructions or pictures of it complete from my extensive searching.

 

any tips appreciated, and the first time I’ve soldered a coach... so be kind.. 

358C4AE2-C011-4CF0-BB7A-E8F51E50A4CB.jpeg

Gary,

Coach body looks ok to me. However, have you soldered in the strengthening/fixing plates on the inside of the coach ends (How close your thumb is to the end makes me suspicious that you haven't). These allow the body to be bolted to the under frame. Also if you have, did you remember to solder a nut on top? (I have forgotten that on at least 2 occasions now and it's a pig to rectify once the roof is on).

Ian

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Ian Smith said:

Gary,

Coach body looks ok to me. However, have you soldered in the strengthening/fixing plates on the inside of the coach ends (How close your thumb is to the end makes me suspicious that you haven't). These allow the body to be bolted to the under frame. Also if you have, did you remember to solder a nut on top? (I have forgotten that on at least 2 occasions now and it's a pig to rectify once the roof is on).

Ian

 

8 hours ago, Ian Smith said:

Gary,

Coach body looks ok to me. However, have you soldered in the strengthening/fixing plates on the inside of the coach ends (How close your thumb is to the end makes me suspicious that you haven't). These allow the body to be bolted to the under frame. Also if you have, did you remember to solder a nut on top? (I have forgotten that on at least 2 occasions now and it's a pig to rectify once the roof is on).

Ian

 

Could you solder the nut onto the fixing plate first  then solder them in the sides. A bit of cocktail stick through the nut could keep it in line with the hole in case the solder softens? Not tried it myselfjust an idea.

 

Don

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Donw said:

 

 

Could you solder the nut onto the fixing plate first  then solder them in the sides. A bit of cocktail stick through the nut could keep it in line with the hole in case the solder softens? Not tried it myselfjust an idea.

 

Don

been there done that,   a lightly oiled bolt worked for me in securing one that came loose

 

Nick B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
47 minutes ago, Donw said:

 

 

Could you solder the nut onto the fixing plate first  then solder them in the sides. A bit of cocktail stick through the nut could keep it in line with the hole in case the solder softens? Not tried it myselfjust an idea.

 

Don

 

David Eveleigh demonstrates a neat way of soldering in bits flush with the bottom of the coach sides in the latest 2mm Magazine.

 

Simon 

Edited by 65179
Spelling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Donw said:

Could you solder the nut onto the fixing plate first  then solder them in the sides. A bit of cocktail stick through the nut could keep it in line with the hole in case the solder softens? Not tried it myselfjust an idea.

Another way is to solder a strip of thick brass (c1mm or more) onto the top of the bracket before attaching it to the coach,  drill a tapping hole through using the holes in the bracket as a guide and then tap them for the bolts.  I did this when I built the CR 45ft coaches designed by john Boyle (who sadly died last week) which have a similar means of attaching the body to the underframe.  No issue if the strip moves slightly when soldering on the bracket since you're not drilling the holes until after that.  Also saves on nuts - but then I'm a parsimonious Scot!  ;)

 

As an aside, I only used two bolts, diagonally opposite one another.

 

Jim

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Caley Jim said:

Another way is to solder a strip of thick brass (c1mm or more) onto the top of the bracket before attaching it to the coach,  drill a tapping hole through using the holes in the bracket as a guide and then tap them for the bolts.  I did this when I built the CR 45ft coaches designed by john Boyle (who sadly died last week) which have a similar means of attaching the body to the underframe.  No issue if the strip moves slightly when soldering on the bracket since you're not drilling the holes until after that.  Also saves on nuts - but then I'm a parsimonious Scot!  ;)

 

As an aside, I only used two bolts, diagonally opposite one another.

 

Jim

 

Jim I am very sorry to hear about John Boyle I knew him from the Gloucester 0 gauge group. 

 

Don

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Donw said:

 

Jim I am very sorry to hear about John Boyle I knew him from the Gloucester 0 gauge group. 

Thanks, Don. 

 

I got to know him in the early '70's and he was very generous in having some of his hand drawn etch artwork shot down to 2mm for me, locos and coaches. My Jubilee pug being one of them. I had hoped to show it to him at the CRA AGM which should have been last month. I in turn made some brass masters for him. 

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Hi everyone

How would you recommend modelling washing on a line.

I have the posts in place and a thin loop of nylon dolls hair for the line but would like washing such as a double bed sheet and pillow cases hanging over or from the line.

Have others achieved this and if so, what did you use to get best look?  I feel paper is a bit stiff, tissue is too see through and I haven't found a piece of cloth yet that is thin enough or one without a weave that is too obvious.

Thanks

John

Edited by John Brenchley

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if aluminium foil might be an answer obviously painting it might be an issue.  I remember Dave Rowe doing some in 4mm I think he may have used thin lead 

 

Don

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely agree with Donw also sweet wrappers with foil. I have used these for tarps as well, obviously painted but you need to get the crinkles you want first unless all the paint will crack and rub off when you start manipulating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Dona and No46

 

The idea of some sort of foil sound interesting.  I just happen to have some Malteser Truffles still uneaten from Easter and they have foil wrappers.  Worth a try

 

John

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could try softening white or coloured paper by reducing the thickness with abrasive paper. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about cigarette papers? A couple of thin mist coats should stop them being too see through but still allow enough manipulation to bend them over a washing line. 

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is Midland cottage on Bath at the entrance to the stables. The line itself could do with being replaced with something finer but I think the cigarette paper sheet works.

 

Jerry

1693361230_DSCF4509(2).JPG.14719e1a51c8d1e950320133575387d9.JPG

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Till receipts offer another possibility, there is usually enough white space for them to usable in 2FS and they are commendably thin and flat. "Weave" is far too fine to be visible in 2mm scale.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kobaru do an etch - they're excellent, as are all their other detail bits and pieces. They used to be available on eBay via PlazaJapan; currently none listed but their stuff seems to appear in waves. It's shown on their website here: https://www.plazajapan.com/4562246951219/.

 

Etched washing, what a time to be alive.

 

Pix

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beautiful etches and a great idea, but who puts their washing on coat hangers before they hang it out on the line? Is this a cultural pitfall for modellers of the Japanese scene? Or something that is prevalent amongst those of us who are "special" enough to be railway enthusiasts?

 

image.png.79912d4189d38bb18b2549941075d33e.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could try dried out tea bags as I used for wagon sheets. Sending this on my phone so can't quote a link, but I think there are photos in my Kirkallanmuir topic somewhere. 

 

Jim 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.