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Jamiel

Ellerby - 4mm, buildings, rolling stock, scratch & kit building.

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Hello, Jamie.

 

If you are referring to the plating that covers the vertical gap, the difference in height, between the running plate (the foot-boarding that runs from the cab to the smokebox) and the front foot-plating/front platform above the bufferbeam, I have always referred to it as the drop-plating - after all it drops from the running plate to the front footplate.

 

In a two-cylinder locomotive with exposed frames (as shown in your image), there would most likely be three areas of drop-plating: one on each side of the front elevation, outboard of the frames; and one filling the remaining area between the frames. Each of these areas may, of course, comprise more than one actual plate, riveted or bolted together.

 

post-7462-0-65768100-1441231098.jpg

 

If you look at the attached image of 44687, you will see no drop-plating, just the high running plate and the front platform.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Cheers,

 

BR(W).

 

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Many thanks for that.

The term will be good for the essay.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel

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I'm not in a position to dispute what BR(W) says, but I always thought the drop-plate was the hinged section at the back of the cab which bridges the gap to the front of the tender?

 

Al.

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I'm not in a position to dispute what BR(W) says, but I always thought the drop-plate was the hinged section at the back of the cab which bridges the gap to the front of the tender?

 

Al.

I've always called this the 'fall plate'.

 

Cheers,

 

BR(W).

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Thanks for the suggestions for the panel name.

Finished on the course, very tired (polite!), essay in, 3 versions of the film in, the films are good, but the essay isn't, but I hope it is enough to pass.

On to the job interview on Monday, but I hope at least a week off before taking on anything new. Hopefully some time for Ellerby to be worked on again at along last.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel

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Good luck Jamie, with both the course and the interview.

 

The idea behind the recreation is novel enough that I'm sure it will be well received.

 

Al.

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I've always called this the 'fall plate'.

 

Cheers,

 

BR(W).

 

Yes, of course you're right. :scratchhead: :scratchhead:

 

Al

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Well first a news update, I now have two jobs, but they are happy to share, so that looks good. Will find out how I have done on the course in a few weeks.

So a couple of weeks off before starting work, and time at last for some modelling.

I bought a Hornby Crosti 9F as a treat. Some detailing parts ordered so I can have a play with that soon, Brasmasters front pony truck, some brakes to steal from Parkside Dundas wagon frames, plus some general detailing to add. Hopefully photos of that by the end of next week, although both Brassmasters and RT are very busy right now some maybe longer.

So something for it to pull, a rake of Dapol Class B tankers, due to get some RT Models detailing etches. The first thing I have discovered is that 2p pieces fit perfectly into the tanks to add weight. A bit of cyano and a sprue off-cut to hold them firmly in place.
Tanker01.jpg

The holes filled as per the RT instructions.

I had built one a little while ago, and forgot to weight it, so a little filing to make an indent through which to drop in a couple of 2ps to the far end, cyano on a chopstick to stick them down. No 'belt and braces' with the sprue. For the near end, a cut with the Dremmel, and then the spruce filed down to make a holder.
Tanker02.jpg

More cynao and them pulled into place.
Tanker03.jpg

Smiths 3 link couplings again in place with cyano (no space for them to be sprung). No Esso oval plates, I want them to look pretty plain. I hope that is OK for the late 50's, definitely OK for going into the 70's.
Tanker04.jpg

I am still gradually working my way through adding the transfers on  to the Presflo's, but just doing that on 21 wagons was getting too much. Also a day getting the baseboards and track sorted so I can finally have some trains running.

Nice to have some modelling time again.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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Guest bri.s

Hi Jamie ,hope you've done well with the course and enjoy your new jobs .

 

I'll look forward to progress on Ellerby

 

Brian

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A bit more work on the tank wagons, I didn't go as far as Michael Delamar's beautiful detailed undersides for the tanks, see.

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/36812-airfixdapol-tank-wagons/?p=1044354

I did try the double links between the brake hangers, but made from plastic as opposed to brass, they were too lumpy, so I just stuck with the single bars across.

Tanker05.jpg



Tanker06.jpg

The safety bars (probably not right term) were added though, and I had much more success with these than I have in the past.

Tanker07.jpg

With the RT models detailing fret I added the parts as described, but moved the ladder to a more central position, to match the photo below, by Jon Hall from the same topic.

post-336-0-56188300-1368734945.jpg

The ladders are a little too low on the edge at the top, but will do for the fist tanker, the walkways could also be a little more central. Still much better than the original Dapol/Airfix details (which were good for their time). Hopefully the next few tankers will show a little improvement in the detailing. I am leaving off the Esso logo oval plates, it might be a bit more 70's , but a lot of photos I have seen of the tankers have them missing, and it allows the tankers to look more workaday, or used in feel.

Tanker08.jpg

I can't wait to paint, add decals and weather these wagons. I love the Presflo's, but the lettering is a 'labour of love'. Hope to get some work done on the baseboards soon as well, and get the layout running again.

More soon.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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Belated congratulations on your job success Jamie.

 

I haven't done a lot to the class Bs I have but it looks like I need to revisit them as the detailing looks good.

 

Baz

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Thanks Barry.

The RT etches do add a lot, but are very thin and delicate. http://www.rtmodels.co.uk/rt_models_032.htm

I have a real soft spot for the old Airfix/Dapol kits with the Class B Tankers and the Presflos.

Off to the shed for a bit more modelling while I have my break before starting work.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel

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A quick update.

I now have the extra boards made and in place, and have also tested the points and their motors.

Boards03.jpg

I have also run a loco and some Hornby Pullman coaches with lights in around the existing track, and although it needs a good clean, and I suspect the locos need a good run after over a year in storage, it all worked pretty well considering. I swapped a long curve right point for a 'Y' so that I can swing the near end of the station tracks wider.

So when I get time, I will roughly make the loops round for the 4 tracks, two passenger and two goods and then get running in, testing, and generally playing with the rolling stock.

I have to test my Bayer Garratt to make sure it is a good one, and test a couple of locos before doing some detailing, noticeably the Hornby Crosti 9F - more on that soon, lots of little bits bought to detail it.

More soon.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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Guest bri.s

Nice to see your back to the layout Jamie ,

I'll look forward to you testing some of your loco's

 

Brian

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A little to update. Loops around the two passenger lines laid and some locos run at last. There is one bit of track that isn't powered up, and a new multimeter was bought so that will be sorted soon. A couple of points don't seem to be working too well, probably the switches not powering the frogs. I am very tempted to try a point juicer for the two big crossover sections at either end of the station.

Anyway I chipped and ran the following.

Hornby P2, excellent runner, and I haven't found the slow speed start a problem other have. Maybe it runs better chipped to control the slow speed than DC, but very pleased with it.

Hornby Railroad Crosti 9F, had problem chipping this, see: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/80314-railroad-crosti-9f/page-32&do=findComment&comment=2042444

When finally chipped it is a good runner, and I have made a start on the detailing. Below is the Brassmasters Ivat/BR Standard front pony truck etch. My first building with brass, other than detailing RTR models with grills, cabs and sides, and the signal I have still to finish. I made a couple of mistakes, but unsoldered and worked back. I am not bothering with springing the wheels by making my own spring, I know some modellers can do that, but for the moment it is beyond me. I would rather go for the Alan Gibson sprung axle mounts next time. I think my version might be a slightly simplified truck, but it is interesting as a start in making something that works with brass.

9FTrcuk01.jpg

The one disappointment is the Heljan Beyer-Garratt. I had read the stories of failures on its thread, but hoped mine would be OK. It is a very tentative runner, and stalls in certain places. Maybe it would benefit from a stay alive setup, but the big worry is that on a gentle 'S' shape of track, with no points it stalls, I suspect due to the shape of the track putting the two engines out of synch and one pushing against the other. I can't leave it to just run in, as when it stalls, I am worried it could burn out a motor. I think the chip may be in backwards as well, it runs water end first, bunker behind, and boiler head of cab in 'forward', but since the the lights don't come on, I suspect the chip need rotating the other way round.

Anyway, nice to run some trains again, and am excited about detailing the Crosti 9F. More soon.

Jamie

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Hmmmmm. 4mm?

Well making a start on the Brassmasters Ivatt/BR Standard Pony Truck has been interesting. I was always prepared to regard the first thing I built in brass as a test, and as that it has been good, but then I thought I would try some wheels in it I discovered that the etch would not appear to be suitable for OO Gauge. The width of the truck would be 15mm, which would be fine for the back to back for EM (and P4 I presume), but not for OO gauge.

These are measurements taken from the DCC concepts b2B gauge:

DCC Concepts  DCG-BB1475
OO Gauge (1:76 Scale)
Back to Back Gauge OO/HO Fine 14.75mm

9FTrcuk02.jpg


Here is an Alan Gibson OO gauge wagon wheel sat on top of an unmade etch.

9FTrcuk03.jpg

Here is the first attempt at a pony truck jammed into the the wheels on the existing Crosti 9F.

9FTrcuk04.jpg

Obviously my first attempt at building a brass model is nowhere near that standard of many modellers on the forum, but even had I done a good job, it wasn't going to be much use anyway.

I have given up on this first attempt, but think I will have to use the next etch as a source of parts to fashion a pony truck built around a narrower scratch center for the frame. The etch is too fine to cut or file back without bending the parts.

Anyway, I will sleep on it, and see what I an manage to make, the detail is lovely, and it would be nice to make something to detail up the 9F.

Anyway, there is a beer with my name on it in the fridge I think (although I may have to change my name to IPA).

Jamie

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Jamie, chuck the gauge away and buy a set of decent verniers. B2b gauges can be wrong and that figure you mention isn't correct. The Gibson wheels look about 14.5mm to me but use a vernier and check.

 

Baz

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Hi Jason, I rather suspect it was fate warning me not to go EM after my experience with Brassmasters. Comet (via Wizard models) came to the rescue.

Barry - I only got the details of the back to back gauge from the website, I haven't actually bought one yet, although I can see it not being too long before I need one.

A couple of quick photos of the truck I built today, using the Comet frame are a little extra detailing from the Brassmasters one. I will post properly on the progress later, but have some tasks to do (Hoovering) after my skulking in the shed while Sarah made my dinner and looked after out daughter for the afternoon.

9FTruck06.jpg

9FTruck12.jpg

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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A bit more detail on the 9F pony truck, or at least a few more photos.

The Comet LS2 bar frame pony truck etch left and the Brasmasters Ivatt/BR standard etch right. The Comet etch is much thicker and was easier to work with as a beginner working in brass for moving parts, but the Brassmasters etch included a lot more detail, but aimed at EM gauge, and a higher level of proficiency in brass modelling. The Comet etch has a centre frame for both OO and EM, and it is quite striking to see how much thinner the OO (left side of the Comet etch) is than the EM.
9FTruck05.jpg

1 hour after starting the Comet etch (the aborted Brassmasters, due to being EM, not OO gauge, etch on the left and the Hornby pony truck behind). The Comet etch is much thicker than the Brassmasters one, and for a beginner much easier to work with. The Brassmasters etch does include a lot more detail though. The soldering on these photos looks worse than it is (but not as good as the experts I know), but have a look at it on the loco, and it redeems itself a little.

9FTruck06.jpg

The 'top end' of the Comet frame is a bit long to fit the space on the Hornby Crosti 9F, so to locate the the hole for the screw fitting I use a nail into my wooden soldering board to hold the position of the round washer from the etch while too hot to hold by other hand, and too awkward by tweezers.

9FTruck07.jpg

I cut in half the top/front 'box' section of the Brassmasters etch, and then filed1mm off each side, before soldering it over the front of the Comet etch.

9FTruck08.jpg

The above soldered on, plus the guitar string (literally a guitar string) spring and a wire through a tube bit at the front.

9FTruck09.jpg

I also added a plate with a bit of the brass tubing to match the lug on the Hornby truck so that the spring pushed into the body could also work with my replacement pony truck. Mistake as the pony truck ran perfectly well without the spring pushing ti down, and the spring only forced the truck to derail at points and joins in the track. I gently pulled out the spring, rather than unsoldering the plate and lug. It was a good idea, but counter productive in the end.

9FTruck10.jpg

My finished pony truck (better modellers could have done a lot more with this from the Brassmasters etch, but I drew the line here), next to the Hornby truck.

9FTruck11.jpg

As above, a comparison of the front of my replaced front truck and the Bachmann one.

9FTruck12.jpg

A side view (with the Bachmann loco in desperate need of some dusting). At the moment the space around the front of the Hornby Crosti 9F looks rather empty, but the addition of steps should help this, and then maybe a little more detailing if needed.

9FTruck13.jpg

I have started on detailing the body, but will post about that when it has progressed a little further.

I will definitely be tempted to use more of the Comet etches, but may improvise/scratch build to reproduce the details from the Brassmasters etches. I was left with a less than positive impression of Brassmasters from my experience making these pony trucks, a bit if you are not modelling in EM, then I am not really bothered about you.

 

Still, a productive day for someone starting to play with actual moving parts in brass I feel.

More soon.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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Thanks to Clearwater for the 'Craftsmanship/clever' rating, but I can't help thinking a 'Stumbling blindly forward, but at least still moving forward' click icon might suit it better, then again we would end up with 'Modelling on slightly rainy Wednesday' icons among the three dozen to choose from if we got that specific.

 

Still, many thanks, and greatly appreciated.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel

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Thanks to Clearwater for the 'Craftsmanship/clever' rating, but I can't help thinking a 'Stumbling blindly forward, but at least still moving forward' click icon might suit it better, then again we would end up with 'Modelling on slightly rainy Wednesday' icons among the three dozen to choose from if we got that specific.

 

Still, many thanks, and greatly appreciated.

 

Jamie

Stumbling blindly forward is what all of us do if we are honest. As you suggest, the trick is maintaining the "forward" bit - in my experience, it is quite often sideways!

 

This exercise demonstrates that you have cleared two hurdles that many never do - working out that you can sometimes get closer to what you really want by not following the instructions to the letter and not being afraid of messing up a few quids-worth of brass by having a go.

 

Nice pix, too. The front view of your new truck next to the original Hornby one says everything that needs to be said.

 

John

Edited by Dunsignalling

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Many thanks John.

As you say it is all a learning experience.

A little more progress, time has been hard to find this week. I have started to work on the front end of the loco, moulded grab rails replaced with wire on the boiler doors, and front of the frame. I have put on some brass etched lamp irons (RT Models), but I think they might be a bit delicate to last, probably designed to be soldered on, and so would be strengthened by the solder. I add a tiny drop of solder to the bend before attaching them, but probably  not enough to make a difference. If they fall of, then I will turn to just a simple piece of brass stuck straight into a hole in the body.

I made a couple of the circular plates seen at the front of the standards by slicing a very fine sliver off a plastic sprue from a kit, and then drilling a hole in the center. I glued them on and then filed them a little thinner once in place.

The front coupling and the drink cocks are from the detailing kits I bought from Ebay (Standard 4 and Duke of Gloucester I think).

They cylinders on the Hornby model are rather plain, in general I think the model has some excellent detail above the running plate, but is not so great below it. I cut some 10 thou plastic sheet to make the access panels for the cylinders.

For the photo the body is loosely sitting on the chassis (in case it looks a little too high).

Crosti01.jpg

I am not adding further details in this area until the two halves are ready for painting and to be fitted together. I think the front steps (Comet etch) might be easily knocked off while still working on the body, so they will be one of the last additions. I have pipes for the front to fit, and am also going to experiment with a pack of Archers rivet transfers on the front of the running plate and the cylinders.

Hopefully I will get time to do a bit more on it in the next few days. I am enjoying doing some work to make this a more detailed version.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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A little more progress.

The pipe work and valves from under the cab have been cut away using a razor saw and a Dremmel, and then sanded with the latter, plus a craft knife. I did leave the top outer valve as the detail looks good, and it is helpful to anchor the other pipes and vales I am adding. A hole drilled for the main pipe to be added back.

Crosti02.jpg

The back valve and pipes from the Comet detailing kit soldered together. Compared to the Bachmann 9F the pipes, or gauge of wire is a bit thicker, but still looks better than the moulded pipes (although I don't think they are that bad for a model of this price). I left off the vertical support wire, as it wasn't needed, and there were enough pipe there.

Crosti03.jpg

The back pipes stuck in place.

Crosti04.jpg

I also had to cut off the very end a metal moulding on the chassis that stuck out where I had put the pipes to allow the body to fit back on with the new pipes. I can't actually see that bar that I cut back on the photos, but that doesn't mean it isn't there.

I hope to get back out to the shed and finish the vales and pipe work this evening. I am going to leave the pipes above the runningplate as they are, as they are really nicelt moulded, butI might look at the valve and whistle on the top ahead of the cab.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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A bit more work, I think that apart from rivet transfers and then obviously painting and weathering that the body is done. I still have brakes, hangers and to work on the tender, and maybe a bit of detailing inside the cab.

CrostiSplitLRG1.jpg

A comparison with the original model (not my photo of the original).
CrostiSplitLRG3.jpg

Next to the Bachmann model, which has very fine details (possibly too fine, but sill very nice) on the vales and pipework. (Sorry for the split focus, not a lot of light in there tonight).
Crosti07.jpg

More soon.

Jamie
 

Edited by Jamiel
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