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Vin

Gresley Buffet - 7mm Ian Kirk kit conversion

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Hi All,

 

I've recently purchased an Ian Kirk 7mm Gresley buffet kit. Why I've done this is because I have built a couple of these 4mm kits from the eighties. So I thought I try a 7mm kit. These modular kits do need a bit of work, but nothing too drastic.

 

post-11695-0-99195200-1335548053_thumb.jpg

 

This is what is in the kit. At the top is the styrene floor for the underframe with the solebars and trussing below the body parts. All the side panels are in the order that they need attaching together, which would produce an original body style. The lower set of panels are the ones for conversion as most of the windows were re-panelled on conversion.

 

post-11695-0-25178000-1335548630_thumb.jpg

 

Here is the results of the conversion. Achieved by back plating the unwanted windows with 20thou plasticard and then making the blanked off holes flush with 30thou plasticard fillets. This all being done at the same time as cleaning up the mouldings. The new vertical beading on the window line is 30thou x 30thou plastic strip, set out at 19.6mm apart. Then finished off with squadron filler and a lot of sanding!!

 

post-11695-0-90132000-1335549165_thumb.jpg

 

The chassis went together just as easy as the sides had done. The main adjustments are liquid lead in the battery boxes to give a little more ballast. Removal of the buffer headstocks from the end mouldings. This just makes the fitting of buffers, couplings and pipework easier. The white parts aren't in the kit but add to the overall appearance of the model.

 

I do need some extra help for the roof, so if anybody can help it'll be much appreciated?

The last thing is does anybody know how many vacuum reservoirs these buffets had (also not in the kit)?

 

Thanks

Vin

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Hmm intersting. Are the underfrane fittings enlarged versions of the 4mm version? I tend to replace these with MJT in 4mm.

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I am afraid I cant help with the imformatiom, but will be watching the build as I might be getting the Kirk SR coaches.

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The D167 buffets have two vacuum reservoirs which are located between the battery boxes, arranged end to end.

Edited by Western Star

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Hi All

 

Thanks to N15 for following I'll be putting more detail photos on as I take them. Cheers to Western Star for the positioning info of the vacuum reservoirs. A lot of photos of the prototype don't show this feature. I guess it must be the angle of most shots (3/4 views and from platform height). Yesterday I was busy with the roof. Firstly keying up the surface for the vents and rain strips. Then I built up some lighting modules to be glued onto the inside.

 

Vin

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Hi All,

 

More progress and many concentrated on the interior. I've sprayed the insides of the body. Firstly primed in white (Halfords white primer) and then painted in yellow (warning panel yellow (pre 1984)) and then masked off for the salmon pink (rail red with a touch of white).

 

post-11695-0-35411700-1335874491_thumb.jpg

 

The 60 thou styrene strip along the bottom edge of each side keeps the panels in line. This is set 2mm above the bottom edge of the panels so they will sit on the floor of the underframe.

 

post-11695-0-16962000-1335874753_thumb.jpg

 

These are the ends and the internal partitions. The top right is the coach end gangway and painted yellow too match the interior. The two left hand partitions are scratch built as they are included in the kit.

 

post-11695-0-94912200-1335874733_thumb.jpg

 

This is the roof with the led strips in place. The water tanks at the end hide the connections and the DCC decoder.

 

Vin

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The D167 buffets have two vacuum reservoirs which are located between the battery boxes, arranged end to end.

 

The basis of this information is some photographs which were provided by either Mike Trice or LNERJP - both of those gentlemen are members of this forum.

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Hi All,

 

I've done a lot more work on this project. This being mainly concentrated on the interior and the spraying of the pearl grey and red band on the outside. The roof has been sprayed white on the inside and the LEDs have been tested. On my last post the interiors had been painted yellow and salmon pink, these were then sprayed with acrylic gloss. Done so that the transfers for the interior would adhere.

 

post-11695-0-30693600-1336138363_thumb.jpg

 

This is the test A4 sized sheet before I put the expensive transfer paper into the printer. The artwork was drawn on Google SketchUp 8 (a free download drawing package). Firstly drawing a rectangle to the limits of a piece of A4 paper by a depth of 50mm (the depth of the coach side). This was copied and pasted 3 times so to fill the sheet and make enough for all the walls and partitions. Select all components and then go to the fill (paint bucket icon), then select 'materials' this should show a list of different textures. In this list there is one called 'sketchy'. Within this there is one named as '(sketch-stone)3'. This was then edited with the x axis changed from 2.400m to 0.600m. Which will also alter the y axis to the same value. Then the rectangles are then filled with it. At this size it doesn't look like stone wall but the pattern used by BR in the late fifties. I then printed this in black ink only, as the colours bleed slightly on the transfer paper. The transfer paper was then coated with Plasticote Krystal Clear to protect the ink.

 

post-11695-0-46109900-1336139590_thumb.jpg

 

As you can see the results are very effective and a good representation of the original on the internal partitions. Showing both the yellow and pink base colours.

 

post-11695-0-24875400-1336139574_thumb.jpg

 

This is the rest of the interior. Which took about 90 minutes to apply. This was because of all the windows and recesses found on the mouldings, I had cut them out into manageable lengths.

 

Vin

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Hi all,

 

I've just finished the bogies, this didn't take very long as I had built the basic shape (only three pieces glued together). After drilling out the axle boxes to accept the Slater's brass top hat bearings. The inside of the side frames needed the circular moulding removing, to enable the Roxey Mouldings 3' 7" wheels to fit in the frames. I prefer to use the Roxey Mouldings wheels for two main reasons, firstly a very good profile and general look to the wheel faces. Secondly they are made of steel and are quite weighty, which keeps the centre of gravity low on the light weight plastic kit.

 

post-11695-0-24754700-1336398693_thumb.jpg

 

This picture shows the finished bogies on the piece of automotive glass mirror that I build all bogies and short wheelbase wagons on. These bogies are basic but once on the chassis do look the part, as all the internal detail is hidden from view anyway. The only additional parts I've put on each bogie, compared to the original kit are the 'Easy-build' brake blocks on scratch built hangers and fitted to a piece of 30thou brass rod. I haven't fitted them to the inside edges of the wheels because the leafspring cushioning pads get in the way.

 

post-11695-0-07946900-1336399347_thumb.jpg

 

The bogie at the top of the picture has the pickups for the DCC decoder super glued. The wires will be threaded through a 5mm hole in the chassis at the kitchen end of the coach so will be hidden from view. I will be painting the PCB and part of the red wire matt black to disguise its prominence.

 

Vin

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Nice bit of modelling Vin. Are you remembering that one of the battery boxes (the one under the buffet side) was swapped for two gas boxes and to the left of them was the compressor unit for the fridge? I assume as well - judging by the decor it's 9135 you're modelling? - When the remaining ones all finally ended up at York carriage sidings in 1977 it was the only one left with that god awful red formica - fortunately the rest were the more subdued grey in the passenger saloon.

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Nice bit of modelling Vin. Are you remembering that one of the battery boxes (the one under the buffet side) was swapped for two gas boxes and to the left of them was the compressor unit for the fridge?

 

Bob, your comment suggests that you just might have some information as to what fittings and boxes were underneath the floor of these Buffets... so, how many battery / gas / compressor / switch boxes were fitted to thse carriages after the conversion to propane cooking?

 

thank you, Graham Beare

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Just one double gas box (2 x 2 bottles) on the buffet side and to the left - just at the bogie end a - compressor box for the fridge unit as far as I'm aware. The tonum control panel and fuse box for the Stones generator was under the corridor side door at the kitchen / buffet end to the right of the generator. I'm only going on memory from working on 9132 and some of it's brethren in the 70s however so it would be worth asking Mike Trice on here if he's any photo's - preferably taken before the "restorers" undid most of the conversion work....

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Just one double gas box (2 x 2 bottles) on the buffet side and to the left - just at the bogie end a - compressor box for the fridge unit as far as I'm aware. The tonum control panel and fuse box for the Stones generator was under the corridor side door at the kitchen / buffet end to the right of the generator. I'm only going on memory from working on 9132 and some of it's brethren in the 70s however so it would be worth asking Mike Trice on here if he's any photo's - preferably taken before the "restorers" undid most of the conversion work....

 

Thank you Bob. Mike has provided serious help with the underframe gear for the D167 and as a result I am reasonably sure as to what is where.... bar one box which appears in some photos. No wonder there is no pre-1950 model of these beasts - either electric or gas cooking.

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Hi,

 

Yes it will be W9135E. I've finished the ends of the vehicle, pipe work, lighting control jumpers and other bits. Work on it will stop until Friday because of work. Then I'll come back to the underframe. More pictures to follow.

 

Cheers

Vin

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Hi All,

 

Not a lot of progress has been made this week, work getting in the way again! I have managed to complete the ends with styrene strip for the gutter tops and 30thou brass bar for the down pipes. The circular connectors for the train lighting controls are from the scrap box. Cambrian kits 4mm axle box covers. The doors have been reskinned with 10thou plasticard to represent the refurbished doors that replaced the gresley panel ones.

 

post-11695-0-49846600-1336937547_thumb.jpg

 

The one on the left is the kitchen end. The one on the right is the other end showing the M3 nuts which are sunk and superglued into a piece of 80thou plasticard. This was then glued to a 60thou piece below it. The assembly was then glued (liquid poly) at 90 degrees to the coach end. These will attach the body to the chassis with 12mm M3 bolts.

 

post-11695-0-32519100-1336937971_thumb.jpg

 

This photo shows the corridor end on the left. Noting the differences between the ends. Since these two photos where taken yesterday both ends have been sprayed rail blue with the doors painted pearl grey.

 

Cheers

Vin

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Hi All,

 

I've done a lot of work on the interior before I finish the chassis modifications. This includes making 24 chairs from 8.7mm diameter styrene tube for the base and chair backs. The legs (all 96 of them) are made from 40thou square strip. I'm glad I didn't make a mark 1 RFO with 48 of them too do. It really tests your sanity after the first ten or so. The sole bars on the underframe have been painted rail blue as all of the mods are inside them.

 

post-11695-0-22028200-1337367914_thumb.jpg

 

Photo showing the chairs painted orangey brown (crimson mixed with golden ochre) with black for the legs. Also the large tables in position. Scaled from a 4mm drawing of a mark1 coach first open table.

 

post-11695-0-93758100-1337368140_thumb.jpg

 

This one shows the tiled floor to good effect. Accomplished by using grey primer and then sponging pearl grey on top. The lines are done by hand with a steel set square and a black ultra-fine Sharpie pen. The pink walkway tiles are salmon pink wash painted on the desired tile and then dabbed off to reveal the mottled grey below.

 

post-11695-0-11489900-1337368175_thumb.jpg

 

Final photo with the painted body shell in position. The central partition is glued to the body to stop it bowing but the end partition with the door is glued to the chassis. This allows easy fitting of the door glazing and a guide for the body on the chassis.

 

Cheers

Vin

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Crikey! You certainly have more patience that me.

 

Well done with all those chairs.

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Vin

 

The carriage is looking very nice how are you going to weight the carriage to give better running?

 

Pete

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Hi everyone,

 

Those chairs weren't that bad as I built them in fours to break the monotony. Unfortunately since I took the photo tonight one of the chairs has vanished. So I'll have to make another if I can't find it.

Pete, I'm going place liquid lead in the empty channels in the underframe. The battery boxes and gas bottle boxes are already filled. The Roxey steel wheels are quite heavy. I'll weigh the coach once I've modified the underframe.

 

Cheers

Vin

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Lovely work Vin. Looking forward to seeing it all lit up after all that work you've done. I've built a few of the LMS Kirk coaches and they seem to be heavy enough with all steel wheels in the bogies. If it still isn't heavy enough Premier Components do a range of cast whitemetal bogies. I've seen them and they look Ok but the price doesn't include wheels!

ATB

Jon F.

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Hi All,

 

I might have to swap the bogies for white metal ones if it doesn't weigh enough. At the moment it weighs about the same as an Easy-build coach so I'll have to see how it goes. In the meantime I've finished the seated area including passengers.

 

post-11695-0-91448400-1337976651_thumb.jpg

 

The passengers are a mix of pre-painted 1:43 scale Chinese made figures and Slater's figures, which took ages to paint.

 

post-11695-0-83990400-1337976972_thumb.jpg

 

Low down shot of the side and interior. The bored passenger is probably waiting for the buffet counter to be finished or maybe just a roof ! The white lining is from Fox transfers which go on well and in one go if they are soaked for long enough. The door grab are spares from an Easy-build mark 1 coach kit.

 

post-11695-0-53602400-1337977369_thumb.jpg

 

A close up of the buffet counter. Made from 40 thou styrene with the curves skinned with 10 thou styrene sheet.

 

post-11695-0-86861900-1337977550_thumb.jpg

 

The counter and kitchen compartment awaiting a coat of yellow, brown detailing and transfers.

 

post-11695-0-39287400-1337977684_thumb.jpg

 

The interior test fitted for final adjustments before painting.

 

Next is the roof......

Vin

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Hi All, steady progress with the painting of the buffet counter and kitchen area. The shelving and wooden supports picked out in 1970's brown. The transfers tone down the bright yellow paintwork. I'm just waiting for another set of transfers to dry, having run out of the original sheet.

 

post-11695-0-40926100-1338066408_thumb.jpg

 

Does anybody know what the uniform for the buffet attendant wore during the 1970's? I can only find the 1960's style white suit with black trousers, I'm not sure if this uniform was carried through to the 1970's.

 

post-11695-0-23865900-1338066648_thumb.jpg

 

Back to the underframe now. These are the tie bars which allow the buffers to spring but not to rotate. The two cranks in them avoids the back of the coupling hook. With both nuts being soldered to a piece of 20thou brass rod.

 

post-11695-0-33656200-1338067244_thumb.jpg

 

The buffer heads just screw into the shank, once happy with the position of the buffer (these have a clipped top) they are secured with tamper proof paint (the red bit on each nut). I could have used Locktite but I couldn't get the lid off!!

 

Vin

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For the staff serving at the buffet counter - Dark navy blue trousers (or skirt)! white shirt and (when they wore them) a bright red jacket - Lounge jacket kind of, with blue lapels - and the obligatory dickie-bow. Depending on the service they were usually pretty well turned out (at least my mate was on the Perth-Kensingtons and the Glasgow-Aberdeens, but the buffet staff - particularly the with RMBs soon dispensed with the jacket and bow-tie! The Buffet Car attendants also occassionally seemed to sport dak blue waistcoats instead of the jackets, as did the women with of course a light blue pin striped? blouse.

Edited by Bob-65b

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Thanks Bob,

I think I'll be going with the more casual look without the bow-tie. Out with the paints. :good:

 

Vin

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