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I think this drawing is an advert in the old Model Railway News, it's dated August 1985, it would be interesting to see what those other kits in the list looked like?

 

The drawing enlarges well with out the lines become wide and blurred.

 

I did not really believe the rather wacky looking brake van shown in the drawing until I saw the photo in the RCTS LNER wagon book, it really existed, A model could be made using some sort of groved plasticard and strips, there is no drawing of the end so the end elevation would have to be worked out or guesstimated from the photos and the width calculated from another accurately know drawing of some rolling stock from a similar era.

 

 

post-6220-0-06861700-1336042846_thumb.jpg

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Still available on Ebay and swapmeets; I think they're from the 'Model Wagon Company'. I thought I had a picture of mine completed, but this is all I can find.

 

nbincbrakeos7_zpse4b2ee99.jpg

Edited by jwealleans

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I think it is unusual, but will make an excellent model, not many will have on their layouts.

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These were originally constructed without much (or any?) superstructure and were used as brake vans to assist in the breaking of passenger trains down Cowlairs incline when it was rope worked. When rope working was dispensed with, they acquired the superstructure and were cascaded to normal goods use and lasted until the mid 1930's.

 

There is no diagram available for them, hence the absence of a drawing. Also, as the superstructure was added in the NBR's works, it is likely that each vehicle was a bit different so you can probably do what you wish and still be right.

 

There is a second photo in LNER Wagons vol 3; Scottish Area (Peter Tatlow: Wild Swan) plus a little more than I have quoted above.

 

I did not know that a kit had been produced; as Jonathan has says, that looks like a Model Wagon Co kit.

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That photo of the Brake van looks a little like the Midland railway one at Swanwick Junction of the Midland Railway in their museum (The Kirtley building)

 

apart from theirs is Grey and some other details. Like the body framework is inside but is very similar in construction

 

 

 

Edited by Madcaravanner

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Model Wagon Company, one of my 'most regretted' defunct suppliers. Their best kits really were very good, although one usually had to throw some of the parts away and replace them with better bits.

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That photo of the Brake van looks a little like the Midland railway one at Swanwick Junction of the Midland Railway in their museum (The Kirtley building)

 

apart from theirs is Grey and some other details. Like the body framework is inside but is very similar in construction

 

If you look at the OP, the advert does describe it as from the North British Railway.

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Hi Bruce

 

Noted that, but I said it was similar although the Midland one is not an incline van but is of a similar vintage and I have local access to it in the dry too

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Hi,

 

It is a Model wagon Co kit. These white metal kits were produced by Ian Middleditch around the same time as I was experimenting with my first plastic ones. We compared notes at Scottish Exhibitions. Between RAF and full time model making I was for a short time a Technical teacher. Ian too was a Technical teacher by day and a model maker in his spare time. He stuck at the teaching rose to head and retired quite recently he now works in scale 7 and scratch builds lovely GSWR locos, I still see him at exhibitions.

 

Somewhere I have seen photographs of the original open incline brake wagons. These had handrails along the side and a "ships wheel" style brake handle. I believe they were worked in multiple and the crew had to move from one to another as they rattled down the incline. Must have been brave men to be pushed over the top of the Cowlairs incline and into the tunnel standing on one of these. When cable haulage was abandoned the best of these wagons had the bodywork added to allow them to be used as ordinary brake vans .

 

best wishes,

 

Ian

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