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Tony Wright

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Gordon Highlander still looks very good in the museum at Bowness, my wife and I both thought how stunning it would look in steam, maybe on the Far North line.

 Bowness is well worth a visit lots of interesting 'stuff' there.

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1 hour ago, Mike 84C said:

Gordon Highlander still looks very good in the museum at Bowness, my wife and I both thought how stunning it would look in steam, maybe on the Far North line.

 Bowness is well worth a visit lots of interesting 'stuff' there.

 

Better clarify the 'Bowness' as one's satnav might take you to Cumbria. 'Bo-ness' is short for Borrowstounness on the banks of the Firth O' Forth.

 

Hope that helps,

 

Dave.

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5 hours ago, Clem said:

Yep, I totally agree.Here are a couple of photos of Gordon Highlander in 1964 in steam on Perth shed I took one and a mate took the other with me standing in the cab ( I was just 13 at the time). She (he?) looked absolutely beautiful. This was the first time I came across 49 and I was totally in awe.  I saw her a few times on a couple of  further visits to Scotland in my spotting days and it was always a joy.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/49_Perth_1_general_qf.jpg.3a30daa6d7b7728d6f912a83c9c90231.jpg

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/49_Perth_3_in_cab001.jpg.4fb002632bf1522a8eea7c7ada334612.jpg

One for the next RTR OO wishlist, Clem?

 

Especially as we now have the equally-beautiful Wainwright D announced. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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32 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

One for the next RTR OO wishlist, Clem?

 

Especially as we now have the equally-beautiful Wainwright D announced. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

Hello Tony

 

We listed GNSR D40/D41 4-4-0 combined in The 00 Wishlist Poll 2019 and gave reasons within the accompanying Guide (where we refer to Gordon Highlander).

 

The locos came in around the middle of the Middle Polling segment...that is up from having been in Low Polling in previous years.

 

Brian (on behalf of The 00 Poll Team)

 

 

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Here's a little progress update on my generic N/2mm coaches project (should anyone be interested). I've selected the four I'll be working on, have repaired a broken body corner (with filler), cut off the end handrails (ready to add wire ones) and smoothed off the five bumps on the roof (ready to add oil/gas lamps and vents). I also had to try and remove a thick and rough layer of gloss varnish that someone had painted on the sides. I've given them a coat of primer as it helps to see any further deficiencies.

 

DSC_8461.JPG.f12600fddac21145848dffafe88eb538.JPG

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On 05/11/2019 at 17:20, Headstock said:

 

In defence of the Parkside (ex Parkside?) GWR Horsebox kit. I painted a train of Hornby and Parkside GWR Horseboxes a year or two ago. The two boxes are similar but slightly different diagrams. The level of detail on the Parkside horsebox was much finer than that on the Hornby ones. The grab handles, for example, are well overscale on the latter. I think that Hornby have also got the vac cylinder and also the gas cylinder (?) wrong way about.

 

I'm several pages behind (still am) and read on to see if anyone else replied but I didn't spot anything, so apologies for any duplication. 

 

Something I didn't spot until I designed an etched chassis for some GWR horseboxes is that the vacuum cylinder and lighting reservoir swapped sides from the earlier diagrams with the same wheelbase for the N16 diagram that the Hornby model represents. In the beginning I'd wrongly assumed that the difference was the length over headstocks due to the change from ends with a turn under to straight ends, which could have easily been accounted for by chopping a bit off / different overlays, and I could use most of the same parts for many diagrams but alas I could not.

 

The brake cylinder on the Hornby model in the photo looks to be the correct way around.

Edited by richbrummitt

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8 hours ago, davefrk said:

 

Better clarify the 'Bowness' as one's satnav might take you to Cumbria. 'Bo-ness' is short for Borrowstounness on the banks of the Firth O' Forth.

 

Hope that helps,

 

Dave.

...which reminds me of the apocryphal football result:

 

Forfar 5, East Fife 4.

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39 minutes ago, St Enodoc said:

...which reminds me of the apocryphal football result:

 

Forfar 5, East Fife 4.

Not apocryphal (although long after Eric's death) -

22nd July 2018

East Fife 4, Forfar 5

(Cup match - after penalties)

You were close, Sunshine!

 

Alan

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Seeing Tony's newly built B16 and its train has prompted a question:

I'm too young to remember main line steam but I seem to recall reading in a David Jenkinson piece that special loads would usually be placed behind the tender or in front of the brake van so they could be monitored. So in this instance should the sheeted load on the flat wagon be at one or other end of the train? What rules tended to apply to this type of situation?

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7 hours ago, Anglian said:

Seeing Tony's newly built B16 and its train has prompted a question:

I'm too young to remember main line steam but I seem to recall reading in a David Jenkinson piece that special loads would usually be placed behind the tender or in front of the brake van so they could be monitored. So in this instance should the sheeted load on the flat wagon be at one or other end of the train? What rules tended to apply to this type of situation?

Yes......but.....

it depends on what is under the sheet. Is it special? Lots of things were sheeted but only some were considered special because they were dangerous, expensive, did not want them to shift en route. I am sure someone with more knowledge than me can be more precise and correct inaccuracies in this advice.

richard

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As the wagon with the sheeted load is not marshalled under the watchful eye of a guard in an adjacent brake van, we can assume it's not a special load of the type that would require such precautions. 

 

Back in the 19th century, when most ordinary merchandise traffic was carried in open wagons and covered vans were few in number, sheeting was the norm. As the proportion of vans began to rise through the first half of the 20th century, sheeting of opens began to decline as they carried a smaller proportion of merchandise that required protection from the elements. Nevertheless BR built fitted wagons with sheet rails, so there must have been the expectation that there would be traffic conveyed in them by express goods trains* that would require the protection of a sheet. But I'm sure that Tony Wright's trains are correctly observed and that express goods trains on the ECML at his date were almost entirely composed of vans.

 

We only get a fleeting glimpse of that open wagon. It seems to be a low-sided or flat wagon with a load wrapped in a sheet, rather than the wagon itself being sheeted. See the instructions (cty Barrowmore Model Railway Group).

 

*Pardon my 19th century terminology.

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18 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

One for the next RTR OO wishlist, Clem?

 

Especially as we now have the equally-beautiful Wainwright D announced. 

 

Hi Tony. I'm surprised to hear you say that, when there's a Nucast kit to be revived by SEF? :-) ... . No, I'm just joshing you. (I assume the verb 'to josh' is not intransitive).   Of course, it would be perfect example for the RTR guys to choose and if fact I'm surprised they haven't done it already. BTW, I'm hoping to be at Warley tomorrow so I'll pop by and say 'hello'. However, there'll be little left in terms of traders that is of real interest to me. Just Alan Gibson, Branchlines, Dart Castings, Eileen's and perhaps a couple more, but it's a nice day out and a chance to chew the cud with a few people and see some interesting modelling.

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3 hours ago, Clem said:

 

Hi Tony. I'm surprised to hear you say that, when there's a Nucast kit to be revived by SEF? :-) ... . No, I'm just joshing you. (I assume the verb 'to josh' is not intransitive).   Of course, it would be perfect example for the RTR guys to choose and if fact I'm surprised they haven't done it already. BTW, I'm hoping to be at Warley tomorrow so I'll pop by and say 'hello'. However, there'll be little left in terms of traders that is of real interest to me. Just Alan Gibson, Branchlines, Dart Castings, Eileen's and perhaps a couple more, but it's a nice day out and a chance to chew the cud with a few people and see some interesting modelling.

Josh away, Clem,

 

It does seem a logical choice - Pre-Grouping, Big-Four, BR, preserved example, but who knows? 

 

I long ago ceased to even guess what the RTR boys might be considering, and, as time goes on, what they produce interests me less and less - other than from the journalistic point of view, where it makes good stories. 

 

There are RTR equivalents for the following, but (in my case) so what? 

 

1840753211_SEFinecastA360111ENTERPRISE.jpg.86d2d9efbf69275cf152abece3215ade.jpg

 

1116575979_SEFinecastA360111ENTERPRISEonlayout.jpg.54e2213fe811998ecb7d26dba38be478.jpg

 

Another SEF A3 built by me and painted by Geoff Haynes. One could argue that the Hornby one is 'crisper', but all that's needed to acquire that is money. 

 

1206488660_DJHA160119PATRICKSTIRLING.jpg.29e323d0d542faf5209d764b4db44e6d.jpg

 

908069814_DJHA160119PATRICKSTIRLINGonlayout.jpg.a50b90f64fa3b10b8bcd84add33a3299.jpg

 

And another DJH A1 for LB (as is the A3). Do I need another A1, or A3? Of course not, but this is what I do. In the case of this one, I didn't build it all. I acquired it earlier this year at a very good price, mainly-made (builder unknown, but deceased). It didn't run very well, though - why is poor-running a feature of so many kit-built locos? So, a mechanical strip-down, finish off the bodywork and ask Geoff Haynes to paint it. Uniquely, 60119 was the only A1 which never received the correct style of '6' and '9' on its front numberplate. It's a bit 'wobbly' in places, but it doesn't half go now! 

 

1021969710_IvattMickeyMouse2-6-0.jpg.79a96c06d426747aa43b8b16a79343fb.jpg

 

1517711515_IvattMickeyMouse2-6-0onlayout.jpg.51c01106803cce04f7974f996ee58fa9.jpg

 

The same builder of the A1 also started this Hornby Ivatt 2MT conversion. It was in bits, in an ex- margarine tub, so I took pity on it, built the chassis (Comet) and finished it off. Geoff painted it. I think it needs front footsteps - a future job. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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5 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Young Jesse and I have been busy-bees.

 

Yesterday, I took him to see Buckingham, now in the care of Tony Gee, and one of the most important layouts in the whole history of railway modelling. 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/258153526_TonyandJesse01.jpg.97e61c385c4d717fc432e99a133cae0a.jpg

 

In 'stern' mode, Tony explains some operational point to the lad.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/31010972_Jesse01.jpg.ac88a30fe989bcc7be121badef958f6e.jpg

 

Who is an extremely quick learner.....................

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/434453277_AlanRollins.jpg.f2f6bc2eac062180bf6827918db6b911.jpg

 

Sending and receiving trains to/from Alan Rollins, who was operating Grandborough Junction. Alan is a regular operator of this classic layout.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/me.jpg.67fbd81b81efdf69d86b8f3947ae709d.jpg

 

Unlike me! I did manage to successfully uncouple a loco from its train in the terminus, jumping as the flash went off - I'm usually behind the camera! 

 

One thing which has delighted me about Jesse is how his modelling has come on since I first met him - not because of me, but because of his thirst for knowledge and the development of his skills. 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/256818295_Jessesengineerstrain01.jpg.54dfd9952b8a996a98baaef311591264.jpg

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/1029022521_Jessesengineerstrain02.jpg.07967142062331eda4dec3edb0168358.jpg

 

He's made this LNER engineers' train, from scratch and from kits. He wasn't happy with the original painting, so between us we've repainted the three vans.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/2132699414_threeengineersvans.jpg.72edebcb471215bf1a8231514f3071b1.jpg

 

Just the application of transfers needed, then some weathering. 

 

Great stuff, my young, antipodean friend! 

It was an amazing evening yesterday, thank you Tony and thanks to Tony Gee and Alan, a really lovely couple of hours. 
 

I am pretty pleased with myself, regarding the Department train, has to be one of my favourite trains on my layout because I’ve built it. Thanks again for the help with the repaint, that blue does look much better! 

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12 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

one of the most important layouts in the whole history of railway modelling

 

Why is this? Could I have bit of background please. 

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8 minutes ago, jbmccarthy said:

 

Why is this? Could I have bit of background please. 

 

I would suggest you go and read some of the dozens of articles about building and operating the layout that appeared in the modelling press from the the late 1940s until well into the 2000s. Or the three books written about the layout. 

 

Great pictures Tony. You look as though you are about as proficient with three links as I am! Kim is very good but I struggle.

Jerry

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First site of Buckingham, via the Rodeller, in my case in the late 1960s, remains a never forgotten experience. With imagination and the application of skill and patience, you could create a believable miniature world, in this case (fairly rigorously) based on past practice, bring delight to all who came in contact with it and derive tons of satisfaction as its creator. There was very little ready to run kit available, so the good reverend made it himself. What an aspiration! Buckingham was a true original and game changer.

 

best wishes,

 

Alastair M

Edited by A Murphy
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33 minutes ago, jbmccarthy said:

 

Why is this? Could I have bit of background please. 

 

When the layout came to me, around 9 years ago, I gave a couple of talks at model railway clubs about the layout and how it came to be with me.

 

I was astonished, when I finished the first talk, that a good number of people at the clubrooms hadn't heard of Peter Denny and Buckingham before.

 

If I told you that the two 0-6-0 tender locos on shed at Grandborough Junction were built in 1946 and 1947 and that the loco shed building is a similar vintage, it should bring it home that Peter Denny was one of the pioneers of the hobby, building very good models for their time, from scratch, in EM Gauge, two rail. At the time, 4mm modelling of any gauge was in its infancy and the vast majority of RTR was Hornby Dublo 3 rail. They were good for their time and many stand up to close scrutiny today. Even most of the the horse drawn carts are made from card, paper and wood, with wire spokes for the wheels.

 

Peter wrote many articles for magazines over many decades, showing how he had used very basic materials and tools to get very acceptable results and his articles have inspired many modellers to have a go themselves. Articles have appeared in Japan, the USA and in Scandanavia and the layout has appeared on television several times.

 

At a time when any 4mm layout with a full scenic finish was rare, the first Buckingham was, as far as we know, the very first 4mm EM gauge scenic layout to be seen at an exhibition or in the press.

 

The layout is still, after all these years, inspiring others and I have recently been sent a set of photos of a layout based very closely on Buckingham, presently under construction.

 

But to me, it is far more than a bit of history. It is a layout where the design, control systems and methods of operation are still miles ahead of many modern layouts and despite a few minor mechanical and electrical hitches, usually due to wear, tear and age, the vast majority of it still runs superbly most of the time and out of all the many layouts I have ever had to opportunity to operate, it is the the one I have enjoyed most by some distance.

 

 

Edited by t-b-g
To correct poor language use!
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25 minutes ago, jbmccarthy said:

 

Why is this? Could I have bit of background please. 

 

2024228914_31nWzvdNudL._BO1204203200_.jpg.611319535991950e95b3d4c846198531.jpg1307058966_51K671mfVpL._SX373_BO1204203200_.jpg.0ca6a889d28e69eb66ef2d2aaa7d9577.jpg46.jpg.85f3e7b89c2150ac28c8e87a7521def3.jpg60.jpg.15ebb93f1cb1cbb3fda85df0b88390c7.jpg

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39 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Young Jesse and I have been busy-bees.

 

Yesterday, I took him to see Buckingham, now in the care of Tony Gee, and one of the most important layouts in the whole history of railway modelling. 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/258153526_TonyandJesse01.jpg.97e61c385c4d717fc432e99a133cae0a.jpg

 

In 'stern' mode, Tony explains some operational point to the lad.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/31010972_Jesse01.jpg.ac88a30fe989bcc7be121badef958f6e.jpg

 

Who is an extremely quick learner.....................

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/434453277_AlanRollins.jpg.f2f6bc2eac062180bf6827918db6b911.jpg

 

Sending and receiving trains to/from Alan Rollins, who was operating Grandborough Junction. Alan is a regular operator of this classic layout.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/me.jpg.67fbd81b81efdf69d86b8f3947ae709d.jpg

 

Unlike me! I did manage to successfully uncouple a loco from its train in the terminus, jumping as the flash went off - I'm usually behind the camera! 

 

One thing which has delighted me about Jesse is how his modelling has come on since I first met him - not because of me, but because of his thirst for knowledge and the development of his skills. 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/256818295_Jessesengineerstrain01.jpg.54dfd9952b8a996a98baaef311591264.jpg

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/1029022521_Jessesengineerstrain02.jpg.07967142062331eda4dec3edb0168358.jpg

 

He's made this LNER engineers' train, from scratch and from kits. He wasn't happy with the original painting, so between us we've repainted the three vans.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/2132699414_threeengineersvans.jpg.72edebcb471215bf1a8231514f3071b1.jpg

 

Just the application of transfers needed, then some weathering. 

 

Great stuff, my young, antipodean friend! 

 

It was a most enjoyable visit and great to see you both.

 

Those are lovely photos but I will just take issue with one thing! Me being stern? Never! Just concentrating hard.

 

I think another hour or so and Jesse would be flying Buckingham solo! He would just have to learn all the little wrinkles such as not shunting on the up line to avoid buffer locking and learning which levers need a little wiggle or a firm hand to make the switches work.

 

Please come again, any time.

 

Tony 

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25 minutes ago, Lecorbusier said:

 

I had almost forgotten that video. Many thanks for posting it. It does show the Robinson 4-4-2T sailing round with one of the oldest trains. Yesterday it stalled with the wheels spinning and is on the "requires attention" list as the bogie wheels were acting more like brakes than anything else.

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The video also shows that Peter Denny wasn't afraid of making use of what RTR equipment that was available - the Triang clerestories of course (establishing something of a tradition amongst GCR modellers) but also a "H&B" van, done up as a H&B refrigerator van.

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