Jump to content
nick_bastable

Whats on your 2mm Work bench

Recommended Posts

I think I've gone as far as I can with the Toad E until I get home. The model is missing a few bits which I need to fabricate replacements due to either not reading the instructions properly or losing the bits because I wasn't careful in cutting them out. The roof is just balanced on at the moment and it appears that one of the hand grabs by the ducket wasn't soldered on very well. I think I'm going to replace the long horizontal handrails with guitar wire and handrail knobs as they are rather fragile.

 

post-943-0-06347900-1535012689_thumb.jpg

 

Overall I'm really happy with how this has come out and for about £12 for all the bits, you can't really go wrong. I'm definitely going to build at least one more (hopefully learning from my mistakes on this one) and have my eye on the dia. 1/506 brake van to convert into an early Toad D. If only somebody did a Toad B, I'd be able to have the whole LNER set! :)

  • Like 15

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well here are the test pieces of ex-teddy rested in place on the layout. It maybe needs a little toning down and as Julia mentioned above a spray with some Matt varnish to take the shine off, but otherwise I think it looks ok, and i'm pleased with the variations in tone and colour, something which is difficult to achieve with static grass I feel. 

 

attachicon.gifCU0J0364.jpg

 

Must sort out that errant piece of cable trunking though!

 

Tom. 

Some time ago Tom but have I missed how you coloured this 'fur'? I am about to start to experiment with some for 4mm. Yours looks really good. Did you retain it by the way?

Phil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some time ago Tom but have I missed how you coloured this 'fur'? I am about to start to experiment with some for 4mm. Yours looks really good. Did you retain it by the way?

Phil

Hi Phil.

 

The basic method was covered in this blog entry: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/blog/347/entry-13164-ropley-no-bears-were-harmed-in-the-making-of/

 

The fur will probably require less savage trimming for 4mm, but if you try this method I would still recommend cutting it before using any paint to colour it.

 

Hope this helps!

 

Tom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since the beginning of the year, I've been tinkering with a 3D printed GNR articulated twin. The prototype was rebuilt from two six wheel vestibule coaches and fitted with Fox bogies. As something to do while waiting for test prints (and when I almost lost the will to live with CAD), I've been building the bogies for this twin using the 2mm Association etches and have, over the last few days, built the three required.

 

post-943-0-13484500-1537631860.jpg

 

They are fitted with the Association's N Gauge coach wheels and, having gotten to this point, I couldn't resist placing them under the 3D printed coach bodies to get an idea how things would look when I finally complete this (no sole bars or any kind of underframe yet).

 

post-943-0-58550900-1537631955.jpg

 

This is very much another one of my 'tinker with as and when I have time' builds so I doubt it'll be finished any time soon - if I can have a running model by the end of January, I'll be happy enough!

 

 

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Phil.

 

The basic method was covered in this blog entry: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/blog/347/entry-13164-ropley-no-bears-were-harmed-in-the-making-of/

 

The fur will probably require less savage trimming for 4mm, but if you try this method I would still recommend cutting it before using any paint to colour it.

 

Hope this helps!

 

Tom.

Hi,

 

Sam Kennion brought to my attention the method shown in this Youtube link, using cat fur. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5nTtOOKan-U. I haven't tried it myself, but it might be worth considering.

 

Nig H

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been playing around with bits of card to make the first section of my Priory Road station buildings while trying to decide exactly how and where I want them as I am not at all sure what looks best or right.

 

attachicon.gifrmweb 02.jpg

 

attachicon.gifrmweb 03.jpg

 

attachicon.gifrmweb 04.jpg

 

 

Hi Izzy,

 

Did you use a digital card/paper cutter to cut those?  Very impressive!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

29361845127_700aa6f436_b.jpgWeichenbau in 1:160 by RCW1810, on Flickr

 

29361845507_de6df0e947_b.jpgWeichenbau in 1:160 by RCW1810, on Flickr

 

44717981631_c1ea1d72f1_b.jpgWeichen-bau teil 2 by RCW1810, on Flickr

 

Not quite 2mm fine but close to I guess, a first attempt at rail building with code 40 on 9mm for a European (possibly Swiss or maybe Tsjech diorama). Next up is staining the wooden sleepers before starting the process of soldering (which is going to be a challenge for me). Any tip wil be welcome for soldering the track onto the cast bases.

 

Kind Regards

Robert

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

29361845127_700aa6f436_b.jpgWeichenbau in 1:160 by RCW1810, on Flickr

 

29361845507_de6df0e947_b.jpgWeichenbau in 1:160 by RCW1810, on Flickr

 

44717981631_c1ea1d72f1_b.jpgWeichen-bau teil 2 by RCW1810, on Flickr

 

Not quite 2mm fine but close to I guess, a first attempt at rail building with code 40 on 9mm for a European (possibly Swiss or maybe Tsjech diorama). Next up is staining the wooden sleepers before starting the process of soldering (which is going to be a challenge for me). Any tip wil be welcome for soldering the track onto the cast bases.

 

Kind Regards

Robert

 

Fascinating to see this system being used. Horrifically expensive though.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Izzy,

 

Did you use a digital card/paper cutter to cut those?  Very impressive!

 

Hi Carl,

 

Thanks for the kind comment. No, just my standard combo of a Swann Morton No 11 blade in a No 3 handle. My wife, (into card making in a big way), did look at digital cutters a while back but found them wanting in several areas. We do get through fair quantities of SM blades though (the non-surgical variety) so buy them in boxes of 20 packs a time (5 blades a pack).

 

I have finished the second building now, it's twin to sit on the opposite platform.

 

post-12706-0-75555400-1537722986.jpg

 

Designing the canopy between the two is next. It should sit height-wise between the two horizontal stone strips.

 

Izzy

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fascinating to see this system being used. Horrifically expensive though.  

 

Very true, but I've tried some others and so far this seems more of a success then the others (N-tram, Finescale-und-mehr). That said, I obviously haven't done any soldering yet so that might change. Luckily the ground area would be limited to 60 by 15cm at the most, so its quickly filled with these long switches.

 

Kind Regards,

Robert

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've started a bit of bow pen lining this even for a commission. The slightly wonky line under the cab Windows has been corrected. Hopefully I'll get a chance to put the red on tomorrow - I'm not trying to put the cream line on in this scale...

 

post-943-0-72817400-1537989427_thumb.jpg

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just coming off my workbench are my next 3 coaches.  These are all my own work being etched by PPD from my own artwork, including the 6 wheeled chassis which have a floating centre axle.

 

post-12089-0-49700700-1538056173_thumb.jpg

 

post-12089-0-52258400-1538056236_thumb.jpg

 

I'll put a little more detail about them (including some close ups in my Modbury thread later.

 

Ian

 

 

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fascinating to see this system being used. Horrifically expensive though.  

 

€109 per point! Makes Fast Tracks look like a snip.

 

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished the build of the next 6 wheeler in the set, a Diagram U21 1st/2nd Composite with centre luggage compartment.

 

The Underframe (the wiggly bit of wire at one end represents the vacuum pipe and is used as a hook to link to the next coach in the set) :

post-12089-0-93323900-1538495330_thumb.jpg

 

Body and Underframed united (although body merely plonked on top) :

post-12089-0-18743400-1538495343_thumb.jpg

 

All ready now for a coat of primer, before heading to the paint shop proper :-)

 

Ian

  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished the build of the next 6 wheeler in the set, a Diagram U21 1st/2nd Composite with centre luggage compartment.

 

The Underframe (the wiggly bit of wire at one end represents the vacuum pipe and is used as a hook to link to the next coach in the set) :

attachicon.gifunderframe1.JPG

 

Body and Underframed united (although body merely plonked on top) :

attachicon.gifU21.JPG

 

All ready now for a coat of primer, before heading to the paint shop proper :-)

 

Ian

Hi Ian,

 

It would be most interesting to see your paint process if you can spare the time. The paintwork of your recent 6 wheeled coaches is so precise and neat, I'm intrigued about how you do this.

 

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ian,

 

It would be most interesting to see your paint process if you can spare the time. The paintwork of your recent 6 wheeled coaches is so precise and neat, I'm intrigued about how you do this.

 

Steve

 

Steve,

The painting is really nothing special.  After priming, the areas that will be chocolate are masked off (and the roof), and the cream upper panelling sprayed.  After a day or two of drying and hardening (with the masking removed), the cream side panelling is masked off with Humbrol Maskol (I assume that can be had in New Zealand?) - I allow it to completely fill the windows too.  Once that is dry, the chocolate lower panels and ends are sprayed (I use Precision Paints GWR Coach Cream and GWR Coach Brown).  Once dry the maskol is removed (don't leave it on for more than a day or so as it becomes difficult to remove after that (how do I know that I wonder?!))

 

Then comes the fun part - the black moulding lines are ruled on with a 0.1mm nib Rotring Isograph Pen with Black Rotring Ink.  For some reason the ink takes well to the cream surface but not to the chocolate (perhaps it's because the cream has had the Maskol on it, I don't know), so I only line the cream areas with the pen.  The moulding lines on the chocolate panels are picked out with Humbrol Matt Black and a fine brush, any errant paint on the panels is quickly removed with a thinners moistened brush.  The window bolections (and door droplights) are carefully painted with Precision Paints Mahogany - getting the right consistency of paint is key as it needs to flow easily off the brush but not so runny that it leaches onto mouldings or cream paint.

 

When all of that is done and dry, it is then into the iterative rounds of tidying up.  Any spills on the cream or chocolate panelling are touched up with one or two very thin coats of the relevant colour using capillary action to draw the paint up to the raised mouldings but not onto them.  Any touching up of the mouldings is done with the pen - this time because the mouldings around the chocolate panelling are painted matt black the ink will take quite well if necessary.  Any touching up of the door droplights really can be iterative, I seem to apply mahogany then cream then mahogany again until I've got them looking ok from normal viewing distance - unfortunately the camera tells all!!

 

Once happy that it is all as good as I'm going to get it, I then apply the transfers.  A protective spray of satin varnish (again Precision Paints) finishes the pretty bits.  Finally, I brush paint the roof with a suitably smokey grey colour.  Once all of that is dry, the glazing is added using the Associations Cobex sheet which is held in place with "Canopy Glue".

 

And onto the next one!

 

Ian

 

Edit : I forgot to add that before I varnish the model, I carefully scrape the paint off the door handles and G scroll handles to leave a nice shiny brass finish.

Edited by Ian Smith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve,

The painting is really nothing special.  After priming, the areas that will be chocolate are masked off (and the roof), and the cream upper panelling sprayed.  After a day or two of drying and hardening (with the masking removed), the cream side panelling is masked off with Humbrol Maskol (I assume that can be had in New Zealand?) - I allow it to completely fill the windows too.  Once that is dry, the chocolate lower panels and ends are sprayed (I use Precision Paints GWR Coach Cream and GWR Coach Brown).  Once dry the maskol is removed (don't leave it on for more than a day or so as it becomes difficult to remove after that (how do I know that I wonder?!))

 

Then comes the fun part - the black moulding lines are ruled on with a 0.1mm nib Rotring Isograph Pen with Black Rotring Ink.  For some reason the ink takes well to the cream surface but not to the chocolate (perhaps it's because the cream has had the Maskol on it, I don't know), so I only line the cream areas with the pen.  The moulding lines on the chocolate panels are picked out with Humbrol Matt Black and a fine brush, any errant paint on the panels is quickly removed with a thinners moistened brush.  The window bolections (and door droplights) are carefully painted with Precision Paints Mahogany - getting the right consistency of paint is key as it needs to flow easily off the brush but not so runny that it leaches onto mouldings or cream paint.

 

When all of that is done and dry, it is then into the iterative rounds of tidying up.  Any spills on the cream or chocolate panelling are touched up with one or two very thin coats of the relevant colour using capillary action to draw the paint up to the raised mouldings but not onto them.  Any touching up of the mouldings is done with the pen - this time because the mouldings around the chocolate panelling are painted matt black the ink will take quite well if necessary.  Any touching up of the door droplights really can be iterative, I seem to apply mahogany then cream then mahogany again until I've got them looking ok from normal viewing distance - unfortunately the camera tells all!!

 

Once happy that it is all as good as I'm going to get it, I then apply the transfers.  A protective spray of satin varnish (again Precision Paints) finishes the pretty bits.  Finally, I brush paint the roof with a suitably smokey grey colour.  Once all of that is dry, the glazing is added using the Associations Cobex sheet which is held in place with "Canopy Glue".

 

And onto the next one!

 

Ian

 

Edit : I forgot to add that before I varnish the model, I carefully scrape the paint off the door handles and G scroll handles to leave a nice shiny brass finish.

Thanks for the painting overview Ian - you do a superb job, in my opinion the best coach painting in our scale. There are a few good key points I note and will tuck away.

We don't have precision paints in NZ, I managed to bring some back from a UK trip one year and they are very good.

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there was an article sin MRJ 52 or 53 I can't find it as I've just moved that shows the painting and lining of 4mm LNWR coaches by Jol Wilkinson of London Road Models which uses a very similar technique . I hope that helps

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there was an article sin MRJ 52 or 53 I can't find it as I've just moved that shows the painting and lining of 4mm LNWR coaches by Jol Wilkinson of London Road Models which uses a very similar technique . I hope that helps

John.

It's issue 52, p27 http://www.modelrailwayjournal.com/issue.php?s=52.

 

Jim

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been working on a devlopment/concept model for an N Gauge Ivatt C1 Atlantic.

 

post-943-0-58731300-1539801067.jpg

 

post-943-0-42179700-1539801072.jpg

 

post-943-0-27576900-1539801077.jpg

 

Believe it or not, there is a good part of a Dapol Hall chassis under the body!

post-943-0-58731300-1539801067.jpg

post-943-0-42179700-1539801072.jpg

post-943-0-27576900-1539801077.jpg

post-943-0-58731300-1539801067.jpg

post-943-0-42179700-1539801072.jpg

post-943-0-27576900-1539801077.jpg

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Believe it or not, there is a good part of a Dapol Hall chassis under the body!

Well the Hall body is pretty awful, so a good choice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.