Jump to content

Anglian

LBSCR ? Gladstone Class ? Beresford

Recommended Posts

I have an image of Loco  no 200 Beresford in Muriel Searle's book, Down the Line to Brighton and am trying to find further images of this engine. Ideally I'd really like to be able to buy a photographic print or postcard but at this stage any further images would be of great interest to me.

 

Can anybody point me in the right direction? Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The NRM has the most famous of the class preserved - Gladstone him/herself. 0-4-2s weren't really up to their original mainline task with the heavier trains in use by the turn of the century, which is why Billinton built the B2s and B4s. Thus the class was gone by 1933.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not Beresford I'm afraid, but the best portraits of Gladstones I know of are those in the "E J Bedford of Lewes" Wild Swan book.

 

Maybe the Brighton Circle http://www.lbscr.org/circle/ can help?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anglian

Is the question about Gladstones in general or Beresford in particular? And is the period/livery important?  

Best wishes

Eric

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks all for your responses. 

 

Burgundy: it is no 200 Beresford itself that is important. The livery – I'm guessing it's improved engine green which features the name painted on the splasher but I may be wrong in my assumption.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bradley (Locomotives of the L.B.& S.C.R. Part 2, RCTS 1972) does not include a picture of Beresford. She seems to have been a Brighton loco most of her career, and would have lost her name some time after the 1905 decision to replace the green with umber, although several other Gladstones did keep their names thereafter.

 

She entered service January 1888, was withdrawn April 1929.

 

On 11th February 1893 she became one of the first locos to receive steam-heating equipment on that railway, and 4 days later worked the first train to use that equipment. Thereafter she was the regular engine on the steam-heated 0845 Brighton to London Bridge.

 

She was one of only two Gladstones to retain a copper-capped chimney right through until Grouping in 1923, although by then she was in the Duplicate List, i.e. not in everyday capital service.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your information. Duncan thank you for the image is this no 200 itself? I notice two spotters sitting far left within the railway boundary!

 

Oldddudders – great info and good to know she was a well turned out Brighton engine – that fits in with my long term plans nicely.

Edited by Anglian
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sadly there was no information with the glass plates, although most of them have been identified. I can't be certain which member of the class the neg is of. I will see about digging out the neg and seeing if it is possible to do a higher res scan of just the number, although it is not very clear.

Duncan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a flag there were small differences between Gladstone herself, and the other members of the class. Check any drawings or photographs.

 

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.