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Thank you for these, as always some curve balls in there for bogies.

I will have to look and see if any need different bogies as they are all on 8ft ones. Though if it is only 8ft6 I might ignore it, will anyone notice that little. 
I base mine around fox bogies of different lengths mostly from dart castings, which I add to to make them look right. I pick the most simple so that I have the least to cut back. Though these mostly have brass ones designed by Gibbs. 

richard 
 

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I have been looking at my copy of Jenkinson's "British Railway Carriages of the 20th Century : Volume 1", specifically looking for the detailed drawing of the Luggage Composite (page 168), and spotted the bogie wheelbase is given as 8ft.  I foresee an order for more ex-LNWR 8ft bogies being placed...

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Word on the street is that Worsley works are shrinking the 7mm suburbans they do down to 4mm and these will be available for 40pds each which seems reasonable to me for all etched bits floor and above. Drop him a line if interested. The more gcr people are buying the more who are going to want to make stuff to support it...........like 6ft, 8ft, 10ft6 bogies.......hint hint any manufacturers out there.

Richard  

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21 minutes ago, richard i said:

Word on the street is that Worsley works are shrinking the 7mm suburbans they do down to 4mm and these will be available for 40pds each which seems reasonable to me for all etched bits floor and above. Drop him a line if interested. The more gcr people are buying the more who are going to want to make stuff to support it...........like 6ft, 8ft, 10ft6 bogies.......hint hint any manufacturers out there.

Richard  

 

I did once ask Allen Doherty (Mr Worsley Works) if he would be interested in doing some etched bogies, just leaving axleboxes, springs etc. to be sourced. He said he would if drawings were available. I didn't need any at the time and didn't have any drawings myself so I didn't take it any further but if somebody has some, it is a good opportunity.

 

Perhaps the axleboxes etc. might be a possible little job for somebody to do in 3D printing.

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I believe there is already a source of 4mm 3D printed 10'6" bogies, which appear to me to have more faithful features than either of the preceding types by D&S or 247D. I don't know who produces them, but I believe that "Headstock" knows the source.

 

I may in due course be in a position to do something myself about MSLR carriage axleboxes in cast resin. I cannot forecast the timescale...

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1 hour ago, gr.king said:

I believe there is already a source of 4mm 3D printed 10'6" bogies, which appear to me to have more faithful features than either of the preceding types by D&S or 247D. I don't know who produces them, but I believe that "Headstock" knows the source.

 

I may in due course be in a position to do something myself about MSLR carriage axleboxes in cast resin. I cannot forecast the timescale...

 

MSLR Axleboxes.

 

I am producing around 4/5 MLSR coaches.  The first, a 3D print of a 4 wheel tri-composite has upside down Attocks boxes which seemed similar to the picture of the restored version.  The others are six wheelers.  I am using these springs from Dart castings.  The sides and ends have been cut on a Silhouette and drawn from the diagrams at the back of a Dow book which had been sent to me by the GCR society.

 

So I would be interested in the axleboxes if you ever got round to them.  My wheels may have to go naked before that. 

 

Thank you Richard, for letting me intrude. 

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3 hours ago, gr.king said:

I believe there is already a source of 4mm 3D printed 10'6" bogies, which appear to me to have more faithful features than either of the preceding types by D&S or 247D. I don't know who produces them, but I believe that "Headstock" knows the source.

 

I may in due course be in a position to do something myself about MSLR carriage axleboxes in cast resin. I cannot forecast the timescale...

Carriage axle boxes and springs are the poor relation as wagon ones are definitely available. So a source for those would be great.  The 3d print ones I think are from Mike trice, but I could be wrong. They are cosmetic sides so need a sub structure. 
 

 

2 hours ago, ChrisN said:

 

MSLR Axleboxes.

 

I am producing around 4/5 MLSR coaches.  The first, a 3D print of a 4 wheel tri-composite has upside down Attocks boxes which seemed similar to the picture of the restored version.  The others are six wheelers.  I am using these springs from Dart castings.  The sides and ends have been cut on a Silhouette and drawn from the diagrams at the back of a Dow book which had been sent to me by the GCR society.

 

So I would be interested in the axleboxes if you ever got round to them.  My wheels may have to go naked before that. 

 

Thank you Richard, for letting me intrude. 

it is really not intrusive. If it is in any way connected and helps someone then happy to have comments on the thread. I enjoy seeing others work as it spurs on my builds / standards. I have enjoyed some of your builds immensely.

richard 

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Taking the advice of others, though no lining pen used or bow pen. Tidying up was by a small brush and a(s) steady (a) hand (as I could manage.) 

F88C60EF-5D25-4962-B62C-BFACA31A1D15.jpeg.b1e9265821853b73fdee52ca1c3f0bee.jpeg
I though using masking tape would help with the narrow waste band panels, but it really did not as it encourages paint up to it so an even steadier hand on the next time.

thank you one and all for your advice. It is not perfect but it is much better than I thought possible.

roof and corridor connection still to paint. The French grey next to it has not progressed anywhere near as far.
richard 

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Different technique this time. No masking. Trusting to a steady hand and a well shaped brush.

68D1DA3A-9514-40AC-A7F0-4A648D64B7D9.jpeg.c76bdc2ffed1234732a81925cd769d20.jpeg

I think it actually looks a lot better, so must be improving. I will need to wait to practice again as the rest are going into French grey. I actually found it quite therapeutic to do. I feel more coaches coming on in this livery. 
I have a set of etches for 6 wheelers. I was going to do them in varnished wood, but maybe...

I know hattons has its generic ones in French grey, I might get a set of 6 wheelers. I know they are wrong but a feel we need to show there is a market for gcr pregrouping to get the manufacturers to consider making more. 
richard 

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15 minutes ago, richard i said:

Different technique this time. No masking. Trusting to a steady hand and a well shaped brush.

68D1DA3A-9514-40AC-A7F0-4A648D64B7D9.jpeg.c76bdc2ffed1234732a81925cd769d20.jpeg

I think it actually looks a lot better, so must be improving. I will need to wait to practice again as the rest are going into French grey. I actually found it quite therapeutic to do. I feel more coaches coming on in this livery. 
I have a set of etches for 6 wheelers. I was going to do them in varnished wood, but maybe...

I know hattons has its generic ones in French grey, I might get a set of 6 wheelers. I know they are wrong but a feel we need to show there is a market for gcr pregrouping to get the manufacturers to consider making more. 
richard 

 

Certainly looking very good!

 

Re the Hattons models- that's exactly my way of looking at it.  The French Grey ones are far too early for me (but I could tempted when the time comes), so I've ordered the GNR ones and will be repainting them. 

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Incoming Pedant Alert!

 

On Wright Writes, you mentioned giving the French grey ones less weathered roofs. The brown and cream livery came after the French grey, so carriages in the earlier livery would have more weathered roofs, having been out of the paint shops longer.

 

That assumes of course that you intend to run all the carriages together in one train; for all I know you may be intending two trains representing different periods...

 

I do like very much what you have done; especially picking out the cross-piece of the windows in mahogany (or similar?) to give the impression of the darker inner frames. So please consider that any observation I make is not intended as saying "you've done it wrong" but merely in the hope of encouraging you onward and upward!

Edited by Compound2632
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1 hour ago, Compound2632 said:

Incoming Pedant Alert!

 

On Wright Writes, you mentioned giving the French grey ones less weathered roofs. The brown and cream livery came after the French grey, so carriages in the earlier livery would have more weathered roofs, having been out of the paint shops longer.

 

That assumes of course that you intend to run all the carriages together in one train; for all I know you may be intending two trains representing different periods...

 

I do like very much what you have done; especially picking out the cross-piece of the windows in mahogany (or similar?) to give the impression of the darker inner frames. So please consider that any observation I make is not intended as saying "you've done it wrong" but merely in the hope of encouraging you onward and upward!

You are right in all observations. If run together the French grey would be more weathered. However, I will run trains in distinct periods as this transition era modeling really plays with my ocd. So the French grey will be set just after the London extension opened with fresh clean carriages with new locos. Or that is the plan. 
richard 

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Don't forget then, as you're going for the brand new London Extension look, you'll want a couple of the brand new engines to go with... a couple of Pollitt express locos would do the trick, maybe an 11A and a 13... or Robinson 11B?

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9 hours ago, Manxman1831 said:

Don't forget then, as you're going for the brand new London Extension look, you'll want a couple of the brand new engines to go with... a couple of Pollitt express locos would do the trick, maybe an 11A and a 13... or Robinson 11B?

These are in the pipeline. Just as a lone modeler building most locos, all carriages and wagons plus the layout buildings etc. it is taking a while. The problem of kids and a job, they get in the way of modeling time.

richard 

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Any one know the colour of tail lamps and side lamps on brake coaches in gcr days. I have a nagging feeling it is buffer beam red but I do not know why. Also the lenses on the side lamps were both red or forward clear and rear facing red? 
any help gratefully received. 
richard 

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I will need to make three of the large vents, 2 can be seen here. ( not the torpedo ones) 

32E90AAB-05F5-4B5A-A177-00BB044CD1B4.jpeg.198b7a5839418a06d68dd9ed79d47e11.jpeg

I have tried building them. I can see that brass rod in a lathe could be turned to make nice ones. No brass rod, and no lathe. 
I have plasticard but in a turned in a drill end I can see this all going wrong. It is really 2mm discs spaced apart slightly on 1.5mm rod. 
ideas?

richard

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Richard,

You could try a 1.5mm rod to fit inside a 2mm tube.  You would then need to slice the tube very thinly.

 

My mum used to have varying size hole punches for working with leather.  I sometimes think something like that would be useful in circumstances like these.

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24 minutes ago, ChrisN said:

My mum used to have varying size hole punches for working with leather.  I sometimes think something like that would be useful in circumstances like these.

I have one of these which was my father's.  They are OK for thin plastic, but can cause a bit of distortion on thicker stuff.  Co-incidentally I used it to produce the locating holes in the base of the building I'm working on at the moment.

 

Jim

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5 hours ago, ChrisN said:

Richard,

You could try a 1.5mm rod to fit inside a 2mm tube.  You would then need to slice the tube very thinly.

 

My mum used to have varying size hole punches for working with leather.  I sometimes think something like that would be useful in circumstances like these.

I had half tried this and it was hard to get thin and consistent cuts and to have them stick to the rod at consistent distance apart. I am pleased to see there might be mileage in the rod in the mini drill trick. I guess using a file to make the cuts?

richard 

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Files are okay, but I got the clean sharp angles and the "slot" between the two closely spaced disc-like features by very careful use of steadily supported and keenly honed miniature (jeweller's) screwdrivers, mis-used as cutting / scraping tools, and, believe it or not, a fine toothed saw of suitable blade width for the slot.

Obviously, I watched out for risks to eyes, fingers and for anything like clothing that can get caught by the rotating drill chuck!

Edited by gr.king
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Few pictures of late because it has mostly been a case of chasing the line which separates the French grey from the brown. 
(some wet paint here) 
3D1BA037-2AF8-4C94-BF44-9F8415648799.jpeg.9fcc1bdc4de98d53344562082154d2c2.jpeg

first the brown and then the French grey but then it covers over some brown so more French grey. However a small slip and then the brown again. And so on and on.  To keep the colour consistent a panel needs doing for each slip. 
cleaning the door handles some paint chips off so repeat the process. 
no need to mention lining. Tried it and discounted it. It leaves ridge lines.

next the roofs. To spray ( in this weather and all that masking.......if it lifts the paint already applied I will ————-) or to brush paint ( with likely hood of brush marks.) the gas pipes are also not white, (black or red?) so that will be fun!

richard

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28 minutes ago, richard i said:

.......or to brush paint ( with likely hood of brush marks.) the gas pipes are also not white, (black or red?) so that will be fun!

If you brush paint with several coats of well thinned paint, spreading it out well and not making any attempt to cover with the first couple of coats, you are unlikely to get brush marks.  That is how I do all my painting (other than when using a rattle can).

 

For the gas pipes being a different colour, paint them by using the brush, not too heavily loaded, side on, running it lightly along the surface of the 'pipe'.  Solder a length of wire onto a scrap piece of metal, paint with the roof colour and then practice on that.

 

Jim

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