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LT Panniers at Kensington Olympia - why would they have been there?

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Hi,

 

I have a number of negs of Panniers L94 and L95 at Kensington Olympia in August 1970.

They are on what appears to be short engineering trains with LT brake vans and the wagons are either opens of bogie bolsters loaded with rails (possibly recovered rails).

 

 

Can anyone help with exactly what they would be doing there and would this be a common occurance? I was wondering if it could be component recovery or perhaps just a shunting movement for Lillie Bridge?

 

Cheers Tony

 

Edit - sorry about the horrible English in the Subject Title - does anyone know if it is possible to edit it?

Edited by Rail-Online

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Probably working out of/in to Lillie Bridge.

 

If you go in to your first post, you can edit the title.

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They came directly out from Lillie Bridge and onto to LT Olympia Branch. At the No.2 G.F. south of Hammersmith Road Bridge, they gained access to the Down Main Line. After passing under the bridge, they would propel their trains over the crossover and onto the Up Goods Line. They would then continue back to the sidings at the former Warwick Road Goods Yard - An exchange of wagons would take place there, and then the same procedure would then take place in reverse - Basically, the move was to obtain new and dispose of old LT PWay components - During my time at Kensington South S.B. in 1973, the move had been dieselised with a 'Sentinel and shunter's wagon which helped to operate the signalling track circuits, and took place at about 7.30am each weekday - 'hope this helps! :-)

Edited by Horizontal

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Great!  I think that might be later than 1965 though.  There is a bright yellow BR van.  I think these were late '60's onwards.

 

Tony

With a Blood & Custard one next to it, so early in the yellow era, which i think started 1963/4.

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Great!  I think that might be later than 1965 though.  There is a bright yellow BR van.  I think these were late '60's onwards.

 

Tony

 

With a Blood & Custard one next to it, so early in the yellow era, which i think started 1963/4.

If you look at the yella van it has the "flying crate" logo not the arras of indecision so I think the caption is correct. The flying crate on containers and road vehicles came into being about 1962. Vans were grey to start with but this superseded by yellow very quickly.  

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The LT panniers also made forays to Olympia BR later in the day to pick up coal wagons from either Olympia BR platform or Warwick Road goods. I spent some time with A.D.K Young early in 1971 photgraphing the panniers at Lillie Bridge, which included such a trip working. Unfortunately I had a crap quality plastic camera but still have the pics somewhere.

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I don't have the answer - but I did know a man who probably would have!  Kirk Martin, our former neighbour in London, jointly wrote the book Red Panniers: Last Steam on the Underground with John Scott-Morgan. I did see his copy, but didn't buy one myself. I seem to remember that it was quite well illustrated. I think Kirk took a number of the photos himself.

Edited by phil_sutters

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These movements are interesting. Some of you may have seen the Kensington Olympia in N thread where acmg is considering how best to model this stretch of line. It would make an interesting layout in itself (suitably reduced in length) with the Kensington High St and Cromwell Rd bridges as the scenic breaks at each end.

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Hi,

 

I have a number of negs of Panniers L94 and L95 at Kensington Olympia in August 1970.

They are on what appears to be short engineering trains with LT brake vans and the wagons are either opens of bogie bolsters loaded with rails (possibly recovered rails).

 

 

Can anyone help with exactly what they would be doing there and would this be a common occurance? I was wondering if it could be component recovery or perhaps just a shunting movement for Lillie Bridge?

 

Cheers Tony

 

Edit - sorry about the horrible English in the Subject Title - does anyone know if it is possible to edit it?

They crossed over to reach the sidings at Warwick Road via Olympia station. The sidings opposite Lillie Bridge were a convenient changeover point for scrap, rails and empty wagons leaving the LT network. Likewise of course a convenient interchange for materials inbound. To be honest I wished I had known about their duties there earlier, as I would have spent more time here as a kid watching them. 1938 stock from Hounslow East and then spotting the last few bits of Q stock from the District line that I needed from the bridge parapets by the Lillie Bridge entrance, interspersed with freights and excursions through on the BR lines.

 

Happy days.

 

Kevin

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Not many 38 stock units on the Piccadilly Line in those days! 

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Not many 38 stock units on the Piccadilly Line in those days! 

If we saw one going towards Hounslow West we would wait until it headed back towards town and jump on just to get a ride in the 1938 stock rather than the run of the mill stuff, likewise on the District Line we would hang around at Acton Town and wait for some Q Stock rather than ride on the R Stock. Likewise at Ealing Broadway to ensure we rode back in the Q Stock after a spotting session on the BR platforms watch Warships, Westerns and NBL Class 22s on local freights, interspersed with Class 123s on the Oxfords and of course the Blue Pullmans, although by this stage they were more grey than blue sadly.

 

Reminds me on sundays there was a stores train at Ealing Common sometimes with a Pannier in charge as an extra treat to make up for the reduced sunday services if spotting at Ealing Broadway on a sunday.

 

Kevin

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Not many 38 stock units on the Piccadilly Line in those days! 

Apologies, going off topic:

 

7590222162_76a9494ea2_z.jpg1938_Piccadilly_17-5-74 by Robert Carroll, on Flickr

 

9980261856_e03052d75c_z.jpg1938-Stock_BaronsCourt_c1965 by Robert Carroll, on Flickr

 

Sort of back on topic:

 

2871610275_4c8832e178_z.jpg?zz=1L95_Neasden_AUG-69 by Robert Carroll, on Flickr

 

6222209179_dc47a73dba_z.jpgL90_Farringdon_APR-70 by Robert Carroll, on Flickr

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