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Private Siding - Lockdown Cakebox


ManofKent
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With my first layout in 35 yrs barely started what better idea is there than undertaking a second project :D

 

Since the challenge was announced various ambitious schemes entered my head, but I confess I'm still hopeless at thinking in scale...

 

I ordered a couple of cake boxes from that dodgy auction site and my first thought was "I hadn't realised how small 8 inches was" (as the actress said to the bishop).

 

 

Cakebox.jpg

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Over Christmas I spent a lot of time browsing the Middleton Press books on Kent's branchlines, and after much playing around, and sketching I decided  to go with a small private siding off a small rural branch line. The main building will be low relief with a hut or porch to one side and a shed on a loading platform to the other. The intention is to try and create something that looks rural, bucolic and Kentish - set some time  between 1930-1950.

 

Construction is going to be of the Col. Stephen's approach - cheap but hopefully functional, using odds and ends spare/left over from building my main layout. I've got plenty of foam left, various bits of wood and I think I've got a piece of foamex I acquired as an off-cut that I can use for a baseboard.

 

I realised composition is particularly important in such a small space - and hopefully this rough plan will work.

 

 

Plan.jpg

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I was going to pick up some ply but acquired some Foamex offcuts that I cut to size. The White piece wasn't quite long enough to do two full sides as a backdrop, but I don't think that matters too much. Track is just a couple of spare bits of Hornby set track spare from the main layout.

track.jpg

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The RMWeb drives me to drink update

 

To form the basis of the rough ground at the front of the diorama I wanted something light and easily to cut with a knife. Three bottles later and enough wine corks to create the foundations for the ground.

 

 

corks.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Whilst I had the filler out I knocked up a loading dock base out of scraps of foam, then coated it in filler. After sanding I tried engraving bricks in the filler... I'm sure it's a possible method for representing brick work but I soon realised my hand is not steady enough, and my boredom threshold too low... Plan now is to cover the thing in brick paper or offcuts of brick plasticard. Probably coffee stirrers for a planked top.

 

 

loading dock.jpg

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A bit more progress.

Loading stage knocked up - coffee stirrers and brick plasticard. Needs refinement.

Assembled a lean-to that was left over from a kit to use as a porch/entrance.

Made the framework of the main building out of more foam off-cuts.

 

 

Progress.jpg

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  • 1 month later...

Apologies for photo distortion.

 

Warehouse largely finished - painting and a few details still to be added.

 

Shell is foamboard off-cuts, windows are from a Dapol/airfix engine shed kit. Roof is scrap wood. Lintel is a bit of plastic T strip with door from wood strips. Wooden cladding are veneer offcuts cut into strips with the brick plasticard the only think I've bought specifically for this project.

 

 

warehouse.jpg

back.jpg

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Still plenty of detailing on the buildings needed, but they've been painted and it's coming together.  Various Tamiya paints for main coats and cheap Liquitex acrylics for weathering. Small porch/hut on left is a modified unused lean-to from an mdf kit that's been covered in plasticard and a door added. Small structure on right is a complete hack of strip wood, mdf and plasticard. DAS for the road/yard (first time I've used it for this sort of thing) needs some work...

 

 

painted.jpg

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Stone sets completed apart from a little weathering powder.

 

DAS clay, scored with a grid using an old blade. Left to dry overnight then individually scribing each set, roughly following the grid, but adding a few smaller stones. Slow work! Base coat of mid gray acrylic, then a mix of mid grey and blue, picked out a few stones with same mix with a little tan added in varying proportions. Final wash of sepia India Ink to tie in the shades and add semi-gloss finish. Fairly happy as a first attempt!

 

 

stone sets.jpg

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21 minutes ago, Andrew D said:

That looks well impressive! Great job :good_mini:

 

Thanks - fairly happy. They're arguably at the larger end of stone sets, but I think still 'to scale'. I am starting to envy the 7mm modellers though :) If I do them again I'd probably make the contrast between the different colour stones a little bolder as the ink wash tones homogenizes a little more than I'd expected, but some stones do have little colour variation...

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13 hours ago, ManofKent said:

 

Thanks - fairly happy. They're arguably at the larger end of stone sets, but I think still 'to scale'. I am starting to envy the 7mm modellers though :) If I do them again I'd probably make the contrast between the different colour stones a little bolder as the ink wash tones homogenizes a little more than I'd expected, but some stones do have little colour variation...


Your buildings are coming on a treat and are superbly dramatic.  If you want more contrast on the stone sets, a subtle bit of weathering to reflect the comings and goings on that bit of track might be all it needs. It looks good to me.


Polly

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Weather continued to be awful so I gave up on trying to spray the backdrop outside and found a large cardboard box, opened the window and sprayed indoors (being such a small piece a box from a beer delivery sufficed). I used acrylic car paint - Ford Light Bermuda Blue from Hycote. It's a perfectly plausible sky colour, but probably means the grass and foliage needs to go Spring or early Summer as the buildings and yard are quite dark and sombre which creates quite a contrast.

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A bit more progress on Sunday and this lunchtime.

 

Windows glazed (plastic cut from tray of tomatoes), rear internal wall added (just off-cuts of pine strip, but I'm not lighting the interior) and buildings glued in place.

 

Bits of  plastic kits used for drainpipes and guttering (lead flashing involves drinking a bottle of wine, so that will have to wait until after tonight - the things I do for model making).

 

I started on weathering and goy distracted by the blank side to left so knocked up a gate out of matchsticks - maybe a little hefty looking but not implausible.. Still wasn't happy so added a door/hatch (strip wood) and pulley (kit spares - roof trusses and tank wheels I think).

 

 Not having modelled for 35 yrs I lacked the bits and bobs you acquire over the years so I picked up a joblot of partly completed plastic kits (mainly military) from ebay for about £5. £5 well spent even if I only use a few bits.

 

 

 

 

assembled.jpg

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Lead flashing fitted to building joins and under windows - thin strips cut from the foil cap that goes over the cork on wine bottles (screw cap wine doesn't offer the same model making opportunities :no:). The foil is less shiny than most foils, but still benefited from a thin was of grey paint.

 

 

flashing.jpg

Edited by ManofKent
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Playing around with static grass yesterday and this morning. Basically, although the soil worked it was unnecessary as it's completely covered up. I'd never used static grass before (last time I did anything it was coloured sawdust if you wanted grass). I picked up a WWS set that came with the glue and spray in the January sales for the main layout (not that I'll be ready for grass for months on that) and it came with a few small bags of their grass. The longer grasses were fine and the tool worked well, but whoever came up with spring 2mm basing grass had this weird notion that grass has bright red stems in the mix. Okay when covered with the longer stuff, but I'll be looking elsewhere for the base grass when I do anything else... Will save a photo until I've cleaned up and added foliage.

Edited by ManofKent
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On 18/03/2021 at 05:33, ManofKent said:

Playing around with static grass yesterday and this morning. Basically, although the soil worked it was unnecessary as it's completely covered up. I'd never used static grass before (last time I did anything it was coloured sawdust if you wanted grass). I picked up a WWS set that came with the glue and spray in the January sales for the main layout (not that I'll be ready for grass for months on that) and it came with a few small bags of their grass. The longer grasses were fine and the tool worked well, but whoever came up with spring 2mm basing grass had this weird notion that grass has bright red stems in the mix. Okay when covered with the longer stuff, but I'll be looking elsewhere for the base grass when I do anything else... Will save a photo until I've cleaned up and added foliage.


Hope it works out OK? We have to be brave sometimes and give it another go!
 

Marlyn

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2 hours ago, Marly51 said:


Hope it works out OK? We have to be brave sometimes and give it another go!
 

Marlyn

I just went for slightly longer grass than originally intended - the next layer covers it well enough. Adding areas of flock (well actually a crumbled up hedge strip I picked up in a bargain bin a few months back) helps. 

 

What isn't going so well is trying to make something that resembles a Hawthorn. I seriously overscaled the first one, and a walk out over the fields confirmed the trunk doesn't want to be much thicker than a model figures leg... I may go for a bramble patch instead if I can't get something I'm happy with.

 

Time is running out and I've got to make/repurpose a wagon or van yet. Probably a low wagon - the door is scaled to take a van but trying one out on the siding make me realise how much it blocked sight of. 

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Grass and foliage is added (well apart from some cow parsley that I want to add but am struggling with...). It's a complete mix of bits and pieces, odd packets I'd picked up in bargain bins and stuff I'd bought ready for the main layout, with the grass that came with the machine & glue set. It's a far cry from the coloured sawdust and rubbery lichen I last used - things have moved on in 35 years... It's been a learning curve, and I might do somethings differently in future but I'm reasonably happy with it. The setting looks more rural which was the main aim.

 

Ballast is down - I just used a bit of fine grit with a little ash from our open fire - mainline ballasting standards not required!

 

Still a wagon to add and plenty of details. Oh and it still needs a name...

 

 

foliage.jpg

 

Yes I did manage to break the hoist in the process - a repair job needed...

Edited by ManofKent
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