Jump to content

Midland in Tewkesbury


Tricky
 Share

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, t-b-g said:

 

Although the carriages may have started life as varnished teak, the chances are that by the time they got sold off as second hand, they would be so old that the varnished teak finish would have deteriorated to the stage where many railways gave them a coat of brown paint instead. If the coaches were in such good nick that they could still varnish them (not lots of repairs and patches that would be visible) they would probably have kept them a bit longer.

 

So a painted finish is more likely.

 

Back at that period, many industrial locos tended to mirror the main line railways and go for liveries a bit fancier than black.

 

So if they were black, they might have some fancy lining.

 

I tend to think of what livery combinations worked on the main line railways and most of the companies that used teak or brown livery carriages hauled them with green locos, apart from the GER with their dark blue. There will be other variations and there were some black locos hauling brown carriages but they were much less common than green ones. I am totally biased but GCR green looks very nice with teak/brown!

That’s useful, thanks. I like the sound of brown coaches and perhaps a black loco still but with some fancy lining, red coupling rods, bit of polished brass and nameplate - that sort of thing….? 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Premium
4 hours ago, Tricky said:

That’s useful, thanks. I like the sound of brown coaches and perhaps a black loco still but with some fancy lining, red coupling rods, bit of polished brass and nameplate - that sort of thing….? 

 

That works for me!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold

Very nice Tricky mate.

I wish I could say the same about progress on my Tewkesbury it's stalled a bit due to issues with my koi pond. I have been able to get a nice collection of loco kits together though and I even have wheels for most of them now. My lack of test track is holding me back a bit so I may build a small one with a few bits of track and a couple of points just for loco building purposes as I need to make them go through turnouts properly well, that's my excuse anyway.

Regards Lez.   

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Premium
13 minutes ago, Tricky said:

Although I’m not so sure now….brown and black? I’d need to see a precedent for that I think! 

 

I thought about that before I replied.

 

Lots of LNER passenger trains, especially after many green locos went black after 1927/8 were teak, sometimes painted brown, with black locos and the same combination appeared on the GCR where after 1907, teak or brown painted carriages ran with locos in mixed traffic lined black. Other railways had similar combinations.

 

From a purely artistic view, I think the combination of a light green, like LNER green, with brown carriages is really pleasing to the eye. But black and brown did happen in many places.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, t-b-g said:

 

I thought about that before I replied.

 

Lots of LNER passenger trains, especially after many green locos went black after 1927/8 were teak, sometimes painted brown, with black locos and the same combination appeared on the GCR where after 1907, teak or brown painted carriages ran with locos in mixed traffic lined black. Other railways had similar combinations.

 

From a purely artistic view, I think the combination of a light green, like LNER green, with brown carriages is really pleasing to the eye. But black and brown did happen in many places.

I agree light green and brown sounds lovely. I’m not sure how that combo sits with other red locos though, or perhaps I’m over thinking it? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Premium
1 hour ago, Tricky said:

I agree light green and brown sounds lovely. I’m not sure how that combo sits with other red locos though, or perhaps I’m over thinking it? 

 

It works well. I have had layouts with Midland red locos running alongside GNR liveried ones and they look fine together.

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Premium
5 hours ago, Tricky said:

More progress on the low-relief buildings. 
BE03CE35-22A2-45C8-8DD9-C9C143B1D0A6.jpeg.e3d232cbfcc2305ba7141124e129ca04.jpeg

 

The oldest buildings on the Tewkesbury Quay Branch dated from the 1840s, so were around 60 years old in 1907. Most photos of Tewkesbury shed were taken in the 50s and 60s - the buildings were then getting on for twice as old and had no doubt been less well-maintained than they had been in their first 60 years. I think you know where I'm going with this...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

40 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

 

The oldest buildings on the Tewkesbury Quay Branch dated from the 1840s, so were around 60 years old in 1907. Most photos of Tewkesbury shed were taken in the 50s and 60s - the buildings were then getting on for twice as old and had no doubt been less well-maintained than they had been in their first 60 years. I think you know where I'm going with this...

Yes, but then look at some of the buildings in the background of photos of turn of the century wagons. I think you know where I’m going with that…!! Having said that, the building above with the two windows and door is in good condition. Very light weathering only to tone down the shiny cream spray paint…

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Premium
12 minutes ago, Tricky said:

Yes, but then look at some of the buildings in the background of photos of turn of the century wagons. I think you know where I’m going with that…!! 

 

Touché! The editor of the Midland Railway Society Journal was frankly shocked and incredulous that this was a Midland Railway building photographed on 14 February 1903:

 

1751761428_99-0257DY2493crop.jpg.2aa864926a24378083ed31260e858c9d.jpg

 

[Crop from DY 2493 / MRSC 99-0257.]

Edited by Compound2632
  • Like 2
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

 

Touché! The editor of the Midland Railway Society Journal was frankly shocked and incredulous that this was a Midland Railway building photographed on 14 February 1903:

 

1751761428_99-0257DY2493crop.jpg.2aa864926a24378083ed31260e858c9d.jpg

 

[Crop from DY 2493 / MRSC 99-0257.]

Shocking indeed! That photo threw my pet hate out of the window of over-doing the slipped/broken slates so beloved of some modellers! Obviously broke a few panes in the process… 

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Premium
4 hours ago, t-b-g said:

 

It works well. I have had layouts with Midland red locos running alongside GNR liveried ones and they look fine together.

 

I agree. I've often thought that a model of Hawes with Midland and NER trains would be very attractive.

 

Dave

  • Like 1
  • Agree 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s funny where inspiration comes from sometimes. Just started this puzzle for the dark autumn evenings - and it’s a rather fetching red Metropolitan engine with equally fetching teak coaches. A very pleasing combo. I have a feeling @t-b-g will be a bit dismayed if I have coaches still in teak livery but I do like this painting! I’ll just have to think of ways in which I can vary the MW livery sufficiently so that it’s not a Midland livery - I guess with non-Midland lining, say something more elaborate? 

5F78C709-B56E-41A4-9A90-53B9184361E2.jpeg.90deb607d9832bc2a7a7bd1ec5286fa0.jpeg

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Premium
46 minutes ago, Tricky said:

It’s funny where inspiration comes from sometimes. Just started this puzzle for the dark autumn evenings - and it’s a rather fetching red Metropolitan engine with equally fetching teak coaches. A very pleasing combo. I have a feeling @t-b-g will be a bit dismayed if I have coaches still in teak livery but I do like this painting! I’ll just have to think of ways in which I can vary the MW livery sufficiently so that it’s not a Midland livery - I guess with non-Midland lining, say something more elaborate? 

5F78C709-B56E-41A4-9A90-53B9184361E2.jpeg.90deb607d9832bc2a7a7bd1ec5286fa0.jpeg

 

Not dismayed in the slightest. I am happy to put forward suggestions but I don't sulk if people don't follow them!

 

It is unlikely that carriages sold of second hand would still be in a good quality varnished teak livery but not impossible.

 

That is a rather lovely picture, very reminiscent of a layout that Paul Bambrick is/was involved with. I saw it at Railex at Aylesbury several years ago and it was truly lovely.

 

http://bambrickstudio.co.uk/whitchurch-road-2/

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, t-b-g said:

 

Not dismayed in the slightest. I am happy to put forward suggestions but I don't sulk if people don't follow them!

 

It is unlikely that carriages sold of second hand would still be in a good quality varnished teak livery but not impossible.

 

That is a rather lovely picture, very reminiscent of a layout that Paul Bambrick is/was involved with. I saw it at Railex at Aylesbury several years ago and it was truly lovely.

 

http://bambrickstudio.co.uk/whitchurch-road-2/

 

 

I never saw it in the flesh but I have certainly heard of it. I think he has sold it on now - but I’ll have to ask him how he did his teak coaches! 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The picture with Metropolitan no.1 (the replacement no.1 - built 1898) and the Dreadnought coaches (built 1910 - 1923) at Quainton road is set in the late 1920s / early 1930s - before the Brill branch closed and the Met was merged into the rest of London Trans[port in 1935. The varnished teak livery on the Dreadnoughts would have lasted till the LT takeover.

 

I can't provide you with a picture of Met No.1 at the same platform at Quainton Road, but here is Met No.1 on 10th Jan 2013 at Moorgate (02.56hrs) with the special working to celebrate 150 years - to the day - of the opening of the Metropolitan Railway.

 

P1050198.JPG.950584f80c326415292226344991056c.JPG

 

The Milk Van (1903) was last refinished in varnished livery when sent to Clapham Museum - it hasn't been repainted / varnished since.

 

The 4 wheel "Jubilee" stock coach from the early 1890s had been sold to the WC&PR circa 1905 where it worked till circa 1940, when the body was sold to a military tailor in Shrivenham. It arrived at the LTM collection in a very dishevelled state in the mid 1970s - being properly restored by the Ffestiniog Railway at Boston Lodge in readiness for the LU150 celebration. All the side panels and one set of end panels are original and were restored with little rubbing down before varnishing.

 

The other 4 coaches were the Bluebell Railway owned "Chesham" set from the late 1890s, that started as steam stock, before conversion to become a 4-car Electric set circa 1905 and then back to a Steam set in the late 1930s.

 

It was all good fun as my early retirement job.

 

Regards

Chris H

 

P.S. - Electric Loco 12 "Sarah Siddons" was on the other end of the train, as seen here before we formed up the train in Lillie Bridge Depot (22.37 hrs), before the departure (circa 01.00) to Olympia and Moorgate:

 

P1050169.JPG.a1c6170ab7ab3ea88961c9bda7a215f0.JPG

 

CH

  • Like 9
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...