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Stockrington - The hiatus is over.


jukebox
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Hi Scott,

 

 Yes. I agree completely with Robert's post above. I have a number of photos of PN where the captions claim that a loco is " leaving with an Up train."  The lamps however do not show the working to be Class A or B, and in any event there would be no such Southbound working. What is happening is that the loco of a terminating train is taking the empty stock down to the carriage sidings. That is the only sensible way to do it really, considering the number of extra movements that would be necessary if a pilot was involved. I also have photos of Pacifics drawing the stock for Northbound departures up from the carriage sidings. The loco has had to reverse down from the shed, so it might just as well carry on till it gets onto the stock, couple up there, and bring it back up itself.

 

I do have photos of the pilots at PN bringing ECS up from the sidings, but mainly they seem to be attaching to or detaching from trains within the station area.

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Thanks for the suggestions, guys.  With Stockrington, it's more of a "need" than a "want" -  I planned to use Kestrel, DP1, Lion et al as they are heavy six axle drive D/E's that will haul up from the storage with no arguements.  But yes, there's no reason the train loco could not take the stock off scene.  The advantage to that is that the entrance to the MPD is then off the route as the loco come slight engine back up "on scene", so getting back to the MPD is a cinch.  We shall see how it pans out.

 

***

 

This week I laid out the benchwork timber; I had all but 6.6m of the vertical members (90mmx25mm) for the L-girders in the salvaged material; so it was off to the hardware warehouse for 8m of 120mmx35mm*, 40m of 70mmx22mm (for the girder tops) and 20m of 75mmx35mm (for the legs).

 

The good thing was, with a detailed plan in front of me, I was able to generate a cutting list so I knew exactly how much to buy to minimise the waste, and with my trusty 11 year-old side kick loading the cutting bench in a sunny backyard, while I manned the circular saw and tape measure, we had that +70m of timber cut to size in about two hours, and only a handfull of ~100mm offcuts that were waste.

 

It was left to me to haul it up the stairs into the railway room, which now is looking a touch crowded:

 

post-8688-0-51336200-1359204585_thumb.jpg

 

Before Christmas, I'd neatly stacked all the timber on one side and the track material on the other, however I realised this week that I needed everything in the middle so I could build the benchwork around the walls... cue a reshuffle!

 

The trick from here is to now measure and mark the salvaged timber to the right size and start making L-girders.

post-8688-0-64413100-1359204605_thumb.jpg

 

No curtains yet - and we'll lose a day because of the long weekend here - but I've been told I have to take one more week's enforced annual leave, so will get a few unplanned days to get on with the build at the end of this week before I start back at work. I can't build the benchwork in front of the windows till those curtain go in, but I can get a move with on the other three sides.

 

*Whilst most of the salvaged material is 90mmx25mm, I had enough larger material for one side of the long wall; as this is the main double decked area, and the longest section, it made sense to spend a few dollars extra and build this out of slightly heavier timber.

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Now that you have cut the timber, what about the man hole in the ceiling?

Have a good days off to for Australia Day +.

 

Mark

 

Bonus points to that man!  Yes, if you study the pair of photos you'll see the hastily removed ladder, too!   I'd just lobbed another couple of boxes of cra.. detritus up there for storage, and so shifted the ladder to get the "in progress" photos.  One or two more boxes, and then the manhole hatch (also pictured, leaning up against the wall) gets dropped back in and we can forget about what's up there for another 2-3 years.

 

Spent a few hours today with my offsider, screwing and glueing L-girders... till I ran out of glue.  Along with a box of 500 wood screws, I bought a single cartidge of Sikaflex, without thinking about how far it would go.  About 19 linear metres, and four construction splices, apparently.  17 metres still remaining, so will nip down tomorrow and grab another two tubes, just in case.  Was a shame we had to stop, as I had gotten my trades assistant into a helpful rythym, lining up and squaring glued timber as I nipped the screws in to tighen it all up. He'd just gotten the hang of it, when the glue cartridge ran dry and we had to call it a day.

 

Quote of the afternoon:

Master 10: "Dad, what would you do if I wasn't here to help you?"

Me: "Grab some g-clamps out of the shed - it would take me longer, but I'd get there"

Master 10: "Geez, I didn't know I could be replaced that easily..."

 

Surprisingly, given his old man has had trains in some form around him all his short life, neither he nor his elder brother have taken any great interest in what is planned for the room upstairs.  Maybe when there's some track down and things start moving, I might get a reaction.  But for now, there's no pressing need to go out and buy a second controller for Stockrington.

 

Maybe The Bug skips a generation...

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Hi Scott

 

I have just arrived at your thread via Jeff's Lunester Layout tag and I find a major project on the go, very impressive & one to watch.

 

Your layout drawings look very good and I particularly like your schematics, I think I might have to draw the schematics for some of my junctions, it looks like they would be a big help especially at my diamond crossings or I may change them to single slips.

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Hi Billy and welcome!   I'm quite a few months behind Jeff, I'm afraid, but at least there is now visible progress and hopefully a good story to tell as I progress.

 

I'm happy enough with SCARM for my planning - but know there are better/more detailed programs out there as well. I think getting one that you are comfortable with is what counts.  Those schematics took a bit of thinking - I over complicated the issue initially, but at some point I got a really good piece of advice: "play trains" on the drawing - imagine you are having an operating session, and see what you would do with your loco movements.    That really crystalised what I was trying to achieve and made me see what trackwork I needed.  I just need to make it look like feasible fiction now...  and of course there's still the curly matter of wiring it all up!

 

Cheers

 

Scott

Edited by jukebox
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Well it's been another scorcher here in Perth - a really humid 38C - so whilst I spent a few hours upstairs erecting girders - I'm about 1/3 of the way there - it just got too hot to push on.  Hopefully I will get more done tommorrow. 

 

I did find I'd made a few mistakes in visualising the 2D print into 3D, and have a couple of places to re-work, but no show stoppers.

 

During the week I had a bit of a play with the geometry of the T14-DS1 turnout-double slip combination (see Post #99 ): out of the box, the Shinohara #6 combination has 66mm track centres:

 

post-8688-0-46017100-1359806231_thumb.jpg

That is not a game changer, but it does make the IP-to-IP a massive 180mm.

 

You can see one of the quirks of Shinohara - the R/H turnout has sleepers perpendicular to the straight leg, whilst the double slip treats each half like a "wye" and splits the angular difference.

 

I figured I could do some surgery on these to get them tighter.  Best way to do that is practice on Photoshop first!  So I scanned them and layered them, and ended up with this:

 

post-8688-0-99355800-1359806844_thumb.jpg

Thats about 44mm centres, and the Intersection Points are now under 70mm apart - so the whole junction is 110mm shorter - very important, as the line out of the double slip down to the storage tracks needs to drop away quickly to dip under an adjacent track.

 

I will need to nip the ends off the last three or four sleepers at the back of the frog (arrowed in blue) so fit the straight track in, but it's not a complicated bit of butchery this time.  These turnouts will be installed level, so I'm planning to actually build the junction on a board at my workbench, and install and test the Cobalts there too, and then fit the whole shebang once it is doing what it needs to do.  But I'm getting a little ahead of myself... there's a few steps to get to that stage.

 

Cheers

 

Scott

 

 

 

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Well another hot one here - it was still 28C at 5:30pm - but I cracked on with the woodwork and at 7:30pm as the sun was setting, I grabbed acouple of in-progress shots, showing I now have end, the long side, and one half side free standing:

 

post-8688-0-32643300-1359891305_thumb.jpg

 

There were no huge dramas - just a few seniors moments, as I realised some errors in my conversion of 2D plans into 3D ideas... only one of which involved nibbling a girder with a jig saw to make it sit down over an underlying bench!

 

I wasn't an A-grade student in woodwork, so whilst I kind of know what I want, the results aren't always too finessed.  But the L-girder system is very forgiving, and any errors I have made can be buffered out in the risers for the trackform.  What was apparent was that a few of the longer pieces of timber had a degree of twist in them (the price of using freebies, I guess) and so some of the legs when attached tended to stray from vertical.

 

post-8688-0-16015500-1359891505_thumb.jpg

 

Once I start adding track, the cross members it sits on will lock all this lot together, however for now I have added some temporary flat braces across the tops of the girders to to keep everything square and as level as possible.

 

There's another leg + brace to add on the left hand side, whilst the river bed in the middle is the lowest point on the layout, and is set at 550mm (plus ~50mm for a base and whatever I material make it out of) .

 

A good weekend's work, I think.

 

Cheers,

 

Scott

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Scott

 

I have been quietly watching the thread in the background for a while but the last two photos have pushed me to the point where I feel I need to speak.

 

“Why, oh why, oh why oh why, oh why can’t I have a room like that”    :cry:

 

Really envious and looking forward to see how the layout develops.    :)

 

Chris

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Hi Chris - welcome, and thanks very much for posting.  Don't be too envious of the space - as you can read at the start of the thread, it came it a high cost, both financially and emotionally.  By mid-to-late last year, it would not be a huge exaggeration to describe my state of mind as depression with regards the mess the builder made of our home.  And the nagging thing is, I know deep down it has not been 100% rectified, so this coming winter I am going to have to go back into battle.  But Gilbert (Great Northern), bless him, gave me some very good positive advice and helped me realise that all things must pass... and that eventually I'd be up to my armpits in model railway and a lot happier.  And I am slowly getting to that place! The other thing that has happened in the last month is the incredibly sad news about the state of Dave Shakespeare's (Tetleys) health.  I think the combination of these things has made me really want to just crack on and build.  It's only a glorified train set, and if I make a mistake, or don't like something, I can change it - it's not a stone carving!

 

Robert - yes, it's splinter and sawdust time!  I must say I'm glad I did the homework, even if some of th eanswers were wrong, it still has helped me think about how the whole kit comes together, and so I've been able to get things built quite quickly.  Still warm here - will be for another month or so, too. But luckily for me, Stockrington faces east - it gets a lot of morning sun, but also a breeze, so the room is very comfortable to work in.  My mid-afternoon, if the day has been hot, the sea breeze kicks in and I just need to wedge the door open and it flows freely from the new lounge on the west side. Summer will be the worst season up there - in winter, because the stairwell is so open, it acts like a chimney and the heat from downstairs carries up.  Just as well, as I can see quite a few hundred droppers need to be soldered by mid year!!

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Well, another week off work this week has given Stockrington a mid-week boost. Not great for the bank balance, but luckily tommorrow is my last day of enforced annual leave - I am back to work on Monday.  Just as well, as I think Mrs.Jukebox would have killed me if I'd been home another week (I was last at work on 18th December - not sure I've ever spent this many uninterrupted days with her almost 24/7!). It was getting a little touch-and-go as the accured annual leave had run out last week, and next week would have been notice+redundancy if there hadn't been something for me to book time to.  So I can put away the baked beans and instant noodles, and shop for some fresh meat on Saturday!!!

 

So, this time off allowed me two three hour stints on the benchwork yesterday and today, plus a tidy up and vacuum (including getting the last storage box into the roof, closing up the manhole, and demobbing the ladder!).

 

post-8688-0-19618500-1360236446_thumb.jpg

This is the South end of the room, 90% complete.   I also took the time to do a stocktake on the remaining timber - as you can see, not much long stuff left.   

 

post-8688-0-95154200-1360236408_thumb.jpg

With a clean up of the room, I was also able to park all the boxes and supplies back under the bench - for the first time, I have a feel for how much space the layout will take up.  It's been a strange 48 hours - looking at the benchwork, checking access and reach lines, pondering the "what if" of if I'd gone for two-aisles-and-three-pennisulas rather than just a central well...   no regrets, just thoughts.

 

post-8688-0-60600300-1360236481_thumb.jpg

The "Door Gap".  Speed 3, perhaps?

 

I still have to beef up the bracing on the two open ends - which is one reason why I made the L-girders here 100mm short from the door.

 

I'm actually contemplating attaching the layout to the walls (something I had not planned to do).  My concern is that as the layout is a "C" shape, and the lift section closes the "C" into an "O", if there is any movement in the jaws of the "C", I will get alignment issues.  Now I intend to build the hinged flap like a battleship, and will include alignment fixtures, but the engineer in me is telling me that by anchoring to the walls, I will be restricting  movement and that has to be a Good Thing.

 

The rooms curtains are apparently six weeks away (!).  I can't actually tracklay the storage yard as the guys installing the curtains need access, but I can get the ramps in and out in, and solder droppers on the ~40m of flex that goes in there. Maybe cut out and set up the turnout fans on boards off layout, too...  there's always going to be something to do!

Edited by jukebox
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Nice to see the progress being made. Honestly 2 isles and 3 peninsulas in that size room would probably end up really cramped or look horibble in terms of minimum radius. I think this current set up with the track plans you have had should look really good.

 

Owen

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Just what the "Freemantle" doctor ordered, well for you anyway.  I am watching the progress from the other side of this hot country and your progress looks good.  

 

please send some rain.

MArk in Bendigo

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just what the "Freemantle" doctor ordered, well for you anyway.  I am watching the progress from the other side of this hot country and your progress looks good.  

 

please send some rain.

MArk in Bendigo

 

Hi Mark - yes, a bit hot here this week again, but a more sensible 26C today.  Good to have you on board.

 

 

Nice to see the progress being made. Honestly 2 isles and 3 peninsulas in that size room would probably end up really cramped or look horibble in terms of minimum radius. I think this current set up with the track plans you have had should look really good.

 

Owen

 

Hi Owen; yes, I think you are right.  I would have needed to disguise some tight-ish curves, and second guessed myself after that,,,

 

I also like the idea of some "depth" to the scenery... it should add a lot to the potential photography scope when I get to that point in time.

 

 

Scott

 

It's good to see such a fine craftsman has been at work

 

I had to look around my thread and see who you were talking about, Billyb!  I promise you there's not a lot of "craftsmanship" in that woodwork - it's more workman-like, I think!  A few rough edges and mis-driven screws, and some ropey less-than-square joins... but as I brace it all up, it has become quite solid - I can stand on it no problem, which is a good barometer. 

 

***

 

So, spent a little more time at it this weekend.  No pictures as 1/. I didn't clean up, and 2/. it's just an extra leg and a dozen or so bracing members - no eye candy as such.

 

The bracing under where the MPD will go is now improved and more or less complete. 

 

I also have started to build the swing up section.  I spent a lot of time this week and last, thinking about how to tackle this area.  It needs to be at least 300mm wide, and carries six tracks across a 900mm doorway.

 

I worked out that the structure needed to be a channel, at least 150mm deep.  This was governed by the 70mm structure gauge and the 55mm difference in elevation of the tracks crossing the gap, plus the need to fix the hinges to the top surface of the channel,  so that it would swing up and clear of the rails.  This also then added at least 150mm to the width to be crossed (otherwise the swing up section then fouls the doorway by 150mm - so the hinges need to be as far back from the doorway as the depth of the channel).

 

I took two very substantial 30mm thick boards (actually brand new gable barge boards, removed by our builder at my direction, as they were not matching the existing ones downstairs ~ he put them straight in the skip as rubbish (!) - the next day, they were in my shed - almost a year later,  they are going to be put good use!). These have been cut into 1200mm long wedges, that taper from 180mm to 80mm.  I've decided that the best way to build the "bridge" is to then screw in four 400mm long, 35mm thick "slats" along the bottom between the boards, and then lay a plywood deck over these slats.  My logic is that this minics the construction of the trackbed on the rest of the layout, and should allow me to match the levels relatively easily. 

 

The mount for the hinges will be some 90mm wide hardwood (jarrah), 460mm across, screwed into the top of the sides (as the sides are 180mm high, there is ample clearance for trains to run.

 

I still need to then build a mount for the hinges that attaches rigidly to the L-girders.  That will likely also be out of hardwood, screwed and glued.  But to get to that point, I need to drop in some of the first cross braces on the L-girders, to determine the final track height at the crossing.  So that means a trip to the timber supplier - maybe next weekend.

 

So in theory, I will have a swinging section that is securely attached to the benchwork, that drops onto a lip on the far side of the door. I'm going to grab some alignment dowels and will fit them to that opening end (which in turn may mean I also use a strip of hardwood on the open end of the swinging section, for durability).

 

The jury is out on the need for a barrel bolt to retain and align the "tub"..,  we shall see how it all comes together. 

 

***

 

Some interesting talk over at conspiracy central Kirkby Luneside this week about locos that do not match the prototype you have chosen to model.  I used to be a shocker for this, and plead guilty as charged to not having a lot of discipline until about a year ago.  Once I drew my line in the sand and decided on the backstory of Stockrington, it really helped me focus what I should be spending my hard earned cash on.  Now I haven't quite nailed down "when" I am modelling, so that still gives me the freedom to pre-order a P2 and yet grab some Newtwon-Chambers car carriers...  but it does mean I am gradually coming around to the notion that the seven (!) panniers and two Duchesses I own are not really going to fit into my plans for a NE themed layout.  It's a problem most of us have at some point, I think: "I like the look of that... $$$... ker-ching!"   I almost bought a City of Truro early last year... but held firm in my resolve.  The problem is, I still like the look of pannier tanks, and think an unstreamlined Princess Coronation in LMS black is just magical. 

 

At the end of the day, the need to fit decoders to many of these locos will be enough of a barrier that it will push me to give away/sell what does not work.  Of course the LT Panner and the Duchesses have already been chipped...

 

I wonder if there's a branch of GWR-anonymous that meets in Perth?

 

Cheers

 

Scott

 

(and a Typo's Anonymous, too, whilst we are at it!)

Edited by jukebox
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Scott 

 

Sounds like good progress on the backboards & structure that's keeping it all togeather, you say it will take your weight, thats a good thing because I have been climbing all over mine laying track, not ideal but it was the easiest way to tackle some of the track.

 

Will return soon to look at updates & hopefully some more photos  :declare:

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Well in a rather neatly timed exercise, after a transit of just five days, look what arrived on my door today:

 

post-8688-0-23107100-1361270238.jpg

Buffers et al yet to be fitted.

 

Rails of Sheffield sent out an email last week about "discontinued stock", and when I visited the website, lo, there in the mix was a Heljan Falcon with silver crests - just what I've been chasing for the last six months! It was the only one, too, as it went "out of stock" once I paid for mine (the blue emblemed one was still there a few days ago... but I needed the silver bird). At a fraction under a hundred quid, it was not a bargain, but they way I look at it, there are people paying that for second hand samples on eBay, so it was a fair price.

 

Rather a contrast to that brace of panniers (pictured here a year or so ago... they are packed in store right now)

 

post-8688-0-00725300-1361270267_thumb.jpg

Curiously, no two alike...

 

Which is bad enough, but my taste for big, blue engines a few years ago (more like a decade ago, truth be told!) also led me down this road:

 

post-8688-0-98603900-1361270283_thumb.jpg

Can Pac and friends, on my Northmoor Works photo diorama...

 

Canadian Pacific is such a smooth runner - and the boxpok drivers remind of C38's from New South Wales. Maybe she needs to become part of Stockrington's strategic reserve!

 

Falcon was an important purchase - it will go with the lighted pullmans to make a Master Cutler / Tees Tyne Pullman set.

 

A great start to the week.

 

Cheers

 

Scott

 

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Hello Scott,

I just saw your Stockrington layout topic in the forum and I am very impressed about what you are designing and building - great work!

I am writing here because it seems that you have a good experience with SCARM - the free railway layout editor that is developed by me. If you have any ideas, suggestions or critics about the program, let me know here or by PM and I will consider all of them in order to make it better.

 

Thank you! :)

Milen Peev
a.k.a. Mixy

Author of SCARM

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Hey Mixy,

 

I have a couple, although they are a slightly more difficult concept to edit. The ability to make custom radius/frog angle turnouts (including crossovers with distances able to be set across tracks) through a plugin and the ability to have parallel track splines (kind of like in trainz)

I love using scarm for brainstorming looks and ideas and this would help alot. (sorry to highjack Mixy's question jukebox)

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Rather a contrast to that brace of panniers (pictured here a year or so ago... they are packed in store right now)

 

attachicon.gifPanniers A.jpg

Curiously, no two alike...

 

Of course there is a precedent for GW panniers at Perth Scott...

 

In 1955, following the failure and withdrawal of the remaining HR 0-4-4T loco, 2 16xx panniers (1646 & 1649) were most bizarrely drafted in to work the short Dornoch branch line from Helmsdale in the far noth of Scotland. I believe that they were nominally looked after by Perth (63A) shed (for any heavier repairs) and they certainly were returned to Perth for storage pending scrapping after the branch closed. Some evidence here http://www.helmsdale.org/station.html

 

Perhaps your quartet can come out of storage in confidence afterall? :mosking:

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Hello Scott,

 

I just saw your Stockrington layout topic in the forum and I am very impressed about what you are designing and building - great work!

I am writing here because it seems that you have a good experience with SCARM - the free railway layout editor that is developed by me. If you have any ideas, suggestions or critics about the program, let me know here or by PM and I will consider all of them in order to make it better.

 

Thank you! :)

 

Milen Peev

a.k.a. Mixy

 

Author of SCARM

 

Hi Mixy;

 

I'm glad you came along - I was going to send you a PM over at MRF (we've spoken over there just recently) to come and take a look here, as I wanted you to see that your hard work has started to generate some fruit!   I've been using SCARM for quite some time now, and have been very pleased with how I've been able to use it to plan Stockrington.  I am fortunate enough to work in an office with a full size plotter, so was able to print out 900mm wide plots of my layout to use as templates.  All I can say is thanks very much for making the program available, and that if anyone visiting this thread is looking for a simple track planing and visualisation tool, then to give SCARM a try.

 

 

 

Of course there is a precedent for GW panniers at Perth Scott...

 

In 1955, following the failure and withdrawal of the remaining HR 0-4-4T loco, 2 16xx panniers (1646 & 1649) were most bizarrely drafted in to work the short Dornoch branch line from Helmsdale in the far noth of Scotland. I believe that they were nominally looked after by Perth (63A) shed (for any heavier repairs) and they certainly were returned to Perth for storage pending scrapping after the branch closed. Some evidence here http://www.helmsdale.org/station.html

 

Perhaps your quartet can come out of storage in confidence afterall? :mosking:

 

LOL!  Yes, indeed - at one point, I had designs on a brace of ex-London Transport panniers operating my dock branch... a mini Neasden depot in a corner of the layout somewhere... this was back when the presence of a flyover and quad/sep tracks was suggesting a London-esque / Eastwood Town style of urbanisation.  And if I really wanted to apply Rule #1, I could still go down that route...  but I have a pressing need to house a half a dozen D/E's somewhere other than Northmoor MPD, so that will take priority.

 

****

 

In the thinking stakes, I've been taking Erkut's advice and considering how to integrate the backscene early in the build, as it will need to go in early, and the supports should be considered while I am building the benches.  Remembering the diagram from Post#18, the West Wall will be the backdrop to Northmoor MPD (in red here):

 

post-8688-0-12856000-1361367599_thumb.jpg

 

I dont need anything too detailed, and the tracks closest to the wall rise approx 60mm in 3m, so I am planning to have a retaining wall 100mm high that is flat across the top, so the retained height will diminish to around 40mm. This will be 10-20mm off the backscene which will be a monochrome representation of down-at-the-heel terrance houses similar to these. If you click on that link, you can see how the more distant houses become almost like a wash - faded and with less detail. That is the effect I want to aim for - not anything that draws your eye to it, but rather a suggestion of dirty, run down, working class dwellings that back onto or face a major railway MPD.  And a brick/stone wall at the top, just a little too high for young boys to peer over and look across to the shed... or is it?

 

There are some excellent resources on Flickr - Newcastle Library has a photostream going back over a hundred years, where if you narrow the search to buildings, there are still around 2000 images to inspire.

 

I was originally going to stitch a long photo together from a selection these images, but now feel I want something more abstract, and theatrical, less detailed...

 

I'm estimating the backscene will be around 300mm high - plus another 100mm to embed it onto the layout, and around 3m long for the portion in question.  I had spotted some thin steel/tin sheet with a baked white enamel finish at the local salvage store - nice and rigid - but that's long gone.  I need to look around and see what else I might use.

 

It's all a bit chicken-and-egg right now - I need to know what I am trying ot secure, and then plan a way of securing it, before I fit the main bracing, as I also need to fit some form of seating to the bracing to hold the backscene in place at the bottom...

 

But what it does show (again) is that nothing happens in isolation - all these parts can come into play very early in the layout build to make life easier later.

 

Cheers

 

Scott

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Hi Scott,

 

Yes, I remember our talk in MRF, but just didn’t guess that jukebox there is you here :blush:

I intend to post an article about your layout, created with SCARM in my blog with link to this topic (if you don’t mind), so other users and modellers to see your work and progress with the real layout building ;)

 

@rcmacchipilot: you can do this even now, by editing of library files, but I can explain this in more details in PM or in SCARM topic here (http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/22613-scarm-modelling-software/), just to keep Scott’s layout topic clear :)

 

Mixy

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  • jukebox changed the title to Stockrington - The hiatus is over.

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