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A Genuine first attempt! N 2ft by 2ft. Little Turnton


18B

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Hi,

 

Well after 20 years of various bodged starts, grand ideas, endless sketches and designs my wife finally got the ball rolling and got me to start our first model railway.

 

Initial plans (by me) were for something larger, but after showing my wife "Circle Street" and the equally as excellent "Littleton Curve" something similar was the order of the day.

 

Small, practrical, affordable and above all "accomplishable"!

 

I'd have liked to have gone a little larger than 2ft by 2ft, but that was the size of board we had to hand. Thus with an Xmas gift of a Jigsaw (thanks Mark) and previous Xmas gift of a Drill (thanks mum and Dad) the two were swung into action to produce a small baseboard. (pics to follow)

 

A mad dash to Total N Gauge (Arnold near Nottingham) saw us purchase most things that we thought we needed, but another trip is planned ASAP.

 

As can be imagined in 2ft square there isn't a lot of room for too much and the mantra is "less is more".

 

Just one 1st radius circle of track, two points to form a loop (for hidden stock) a small platfrom, and a small coal siding at the front.

 

Not the worlds most prototypical layout, but it's a first attempt and the aim is to finish it and see what sort of job we've made o fit before attempting something larger.

 

RE: Coal staithes, this question has been asked before, but has anyone got a prototypical picture of a small coal yard in the diesel era?

 

RE: Peco platform edging, anyone know if it's possible to warm and bend them to form the edge of a platform for Farish first radius curves (outside of the circle)?

 

Pics to follow,

 

Alex and Amy.

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Regarding the Peco platform edging, if you make saw cuts into the horizontal bits at regular intervals (say, every 1cm or so) you can then bend them easily (this is detailed in the instructions btw, but perhaps you bought them second-hand or something)

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Regarding the Peco platform edging, if you make saw cuts into the horizontal bits at regular intervals (say, every 1cm or so) you can then bend them easily (this is detailed in the instructions btw, but perhaps you bought them second-hand or something)

 

Yet to look inside the packet, we noticed the section at the back and wondered whether cutting it would help with the curvature.

 

"every 1cm or so", will give it a go.

 

Bought some slaters plasticard sheet, the sheet is big enough to do the whole platform surface in one go and when sat on the peco platform edging, it should (hopefully) look good.

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OK...read your post again and you clearly state Littleton Curve as inspiration.....

 

...enjoy the link anyway and I still would like to see some photos!

 

 

Thank you for the link,

 

Photo's on their way. :rolleyes:

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Hi,

 

Well after 20 years of various bodged starts, grand ideas, endless sketches and designs my wife finally got the ball rolling and got me to start our first model railway.

 

Initial plans (by me) were for something larger, but after showing my wife "Circle Street" and the equally as excellent "Littleton Curve" something similar was the order of the day.

 

 

You've made my day! I have inspired some one!!! Keep us up to speed.

 

Paul

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First Picture.

 

the jigsaw shows the size of the board (only 2ft by 2ft) along with a few pieces of track and a Peco Van. (The frame is placed on top of the board :unsure: and was pinned and glued down after the pic was took,

 

First problem, used the Peco smallest redius points and my Farish Class 20 seems to derail on it 70-80% of the time. Anyone any ideas why this might be?

 

The pencil marks show the rough idea, a loop at the back (to store an alternate rake of stock) and a small siding at the front for a few coal wagons, also plans for a short patform at the back.

post-6082-1262651120568_thumb.jpg

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The small station building, building by Scencraft and signs by Scalescenes.

 

post-6082-12627367007394_thumb.jpg

 

post-6082-12627299154352_thumb.jpg

 

post-6082-12627299248352_thumb.jpg

 

post-6082-12627299324629_thumb.jpg

 

Went to work and got posted these pics by my wife of the signs on the building! :D Very pleased

 

In case any one is wondering why "Little Turnton" Little for obvious reasons and Turnditch is where my wife teaches, - shortened to Turnton.

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Ooooh, hang on a mo, best read the instructions for the exact distance as I was going from memory there! I'd hate for you to knacker them.

 

The actual instructions state a very precise 12mm, so around that make "should be ok" for the platform edging to bend, hopefully. will post the pics when done.

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Well, this is turning out as a suprise,

 

Alex - Basebard built, Sides glued and pinned on.

Amy - Cork underlay glued down, Wiring layed out and cut, ALL soldering of the lights and power connections, :rolleyes: :D

 

The mod rock has been sourced along with paints for the base colour ready for scatter.

 

Lessons learnt so far:

 

1) 1st radius curves are just too tight! some of my stock wont couple - even wagons.

2) Don't do fiddly things until last. they'll end up broken or causing too much care to be taken to work around them. e.g. the station building, terrified of knocking Amy's "Way out" sign off the building!

3) Buy the right buildings for the requirement, not just what looks good and the shop happens to have in.

4) Stop procastinating and get cracked on!

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post-6082-12633050131025_thumb.jpg

 

Amy's wiring laid out,

 

any help with the folowing qeurie would be most useful and appreciated.

 

1) We're thinking, would it be wise to use a glue gun to hold the wires in place now that they've been soldered and tested? Or would dollops of PVA be better?

 

2) Which would people suggest doing first, pinning and glueing the track followed by ballasting THEN the Messy part of Scenery (mod rocking etc) or the other way, Scenery then ballast track etc?

 

The videos and books suggest the former?

 

3) Because we want a curved back scene and the MDF board we have is too thick to curve, would think artist mount board be a good idea? and would paiting it first be best? Don;t want it to crack up etc when curved inwards?

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1) I don't think it matters - though the glue from a gun tends to set faster, so you're not going to have to hold the wires in place for as long.

 

2) I'd do the scenery construction first - and put masking tape over the track to protect it. Then do the ballasting.

 

3) Don't know - never tried artist mount board, nor have I tried to do curved back scenes for a long time (and then I was only helping someone who knew what they were doing...)

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That looks like my wiring!

 

bychanac.jpg

 

I keep that in the garage and don't have any problems, but now you mention it I think a glue gun or PVA might be a better bet. PVA sounds best as that can always be peeled off if ever you need to replace any wiring. Put some decent sized blobs on to hold it in place and away you go.

 

I tend to ballast and then do the scenics but each to their own really. I'm not sure if there's a definitive reason for doing one before the other but would be interested to see what people say on that.

 

Can't help with the curved backscene query... but again will be interested in the replies...

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Can't help with the curved backscene query... but again will be interested in the replies...

 

Well, sourced the right sort of card, gave it a base coat of white and left it to dry. noticed this morning it curled up, but thankfully in the right way! so we'll see hopefully it will work.

 

looed at the soldering again last night and it doesn;t like we've done too a good a job of it, text books describe it as should look bright and shiney, ours is dull and crumbly looking, books suggest not enough flux? and/or high enough temperature. It all works at the mo, but worry the joins might fail in the future?

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post-6082-12636832076465_thumb.jpg

 

Hi

 

PROGRESS! here is a pic of the track, layed & pinned in place.

 

The brass tube is for the wire in tube point operation, never done such a thing before, but hopefully it will work ok.

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Hi,

 

My home made wire in tube point operation, the wire is picture framing wire and the tube, 1mm brass tube from B&Q. the angles were sawn down from larger angles from B&Q.

 

They work, just hope they stay working.

 

post-6082-12638084705447_thumb.jpg

 

Lessons learnt on points

 

1) Not until after laying the control to two did I realise that there were little holes in the point switch bar that would allow the wire to pop into! I'd been making a loop and popping it onto the pip! Dam!!!

 

2) Use a switch for the end where you operate it, either that or a thicker wire (and wider tube)

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Hi,

 

been painting the rails today, what a pain of a job, but worth it.

 

Looking for some constructive critism really, this is our first attempt and we're steadily getting there.

 

Alex and Amy.

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I tend to ballast and then do the scenics but each to their own really. I'm not sure if there's a definitive reason for doing one before the other but would be interested to see what people say on that.

 

The thinking behind doing the scenics first is that in real life the scenery was there first!! Ballast is almost the last thing to go down, along with the track. However, I've never heard of anyone doing all the scenery first and laying the track last!! That would be taking things a bit too far!!

 

18B writes: Looking for some constructive criticism really, this is our first attempt and we're steadily getting there.

You certainly are! I think this looks a great little project, and as you say, it's acheivable, which is the main thing! So many projects fall by the wayside because the ammount of work involved to finish them has been underestimated! Keep up the good work!

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Evening

 

post-6082-12639964131421_thumb.jpg

 

Here is a pic of Amy's handy work, the curved platform were a real pain, the slits made the plastic curve well but the pins were needed to keep it place whilst the glue behind set to hopefully hold them in place.

 

The lovely paint work was a mixture of acrylics and water colours, first a mortar colour was applied and wiped off, then individual stones were picked out in various shades.

 

Comments and helpful criticism most appreciated

 

Alex and Amy.

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