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Third bite: "The sidings"

Posted by Mikkel , in The Sidings 18 March 2014 · 2,348 views

GWR Gloucester Trackplan
Third bite: "The sidings" I’ve slowly started work on the next layout in the Farthing series. “The sidings” are inspired by an interesting arrangement at the back of Gloucester Old Yard, where a headshunt served a series of kickback sidings that gave access to a variety of facilities: One siding served a private “biscuit” depot, another served the local waterworks, and finally there was a backroad to the loco depot’s ash sidings and coaling stage.




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Above left is the overall layout at Gloucester (see this post for details). The headshunt is in red. On the right is the rudely simplified and manipulated trackplan that I have extracted from this to suit my available space and personal tastes.



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Trackplan
Here is the plan again, as it will appear on the layout. The scenic part of the layout will focus on the “neck” of the headshunt (what I think the GWR would have called a shunting spur), as well as the biscuit- and waterworks sidings - all turned through 180 degrees compared to Gloucester. Also featured on the layout is the lowermost siding of the main yard, where Loco Coal and ash wagons are stored, as per Gloucester. The "backroad" siding leading to the loco depot is mostly off-scene, but still plays an important part in operating the layout. The rest of the station is represented by a simple fiddle yard. The headshunt and sidings can accommodate a minimum of 3 “standard” four-wheel wagons and a tank loco. The very short shunting spur emulates that at Gloucester.



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Operation
The table above shows the main "moves" I can make on the layout. An interesting operational feature at Gloucester was the exchange of Loco Coal and ash wagons: These were stored in the main yard, and when needed they were picked up by the yard shunter, moved to the headshunt and turned over to the shed pilot, which then propelled them to the loco depot. The yard shunter also worked wagons into the “biscuit siding” and the waterworks. These features are carried over to my layout - although I'm taking some liberties: In reality the biscuit siding was partly operated by gravity shunting, but I’m not doing that! As for the waterworks, I don’t know exactly what the traffic was, but a bit of research and photos suggests coal in for the pumping engines, and waste ash out. As salt was sometimes used for water softening I also saw an opportunity to also run a salt wagon or two, until someone corrects me!


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Buildings
I want to use this layout as a way to improve my skills at constructing prototype buildings. So I've been looking around for various prototypes that were either standard GWR or that I found interesting. Some will be replicated directly, others will be adapted.

Biscuit shed. The actual shed at Gloucester wasn’t very inspiring, so I will base mine on a downsized version of the rather nice "beer shed" at Stratford on Avon. This is open at the front and thereby gives a view across the loading dock into the shed, as indicated above. It is closed at the back and thereby hides the small radius point and entry to the fiddle yard behind it.

Stable block. Can’t have a Farthing layout without horses! And I’ve always wanted a stable block. It will be fairly large with 8-9 stalls, reflecting that Farthing is a medium-sized mainline junction. Similar to the one at Witney.

Mess room. This was inspired by the lovely GWR building in Truro yard that CK has kindly shared some photos of here.

Water works. Not sure how I will do this yet, and I may chose only to have the works lightly indicated. In any case I'm thinking something low, like these at Low Bradfield - althought it would be nice if I could find a prototype in GWR territory.

Replaceable cameo. I’m pondering whether I can try out the idea of replaceable cameos in the waterworks siding, similar to the idea sketched out previously in this post.


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Above is an updated attempt at showing the overall scheme of things at Farthing so far. I don’t intend to actually join up the layouts in practice, but it’s nice to have a general storyline behind it all. Sadly I haven’t given much serious thought to this as I went along, which means it’s now a bit of a challenge to make it all fit into an overall plan that makes reasonable sense. Anyway, essentially we’re talking about a medium-sized junction station in a cutting, with some creative earthworks to accommodate the growing town around it. Shades of Newbury, a touch of Kings Meadow, and delusions of Gloucester!

That's about it for now. My original idea was to set the layout in the 1940s, but after mulling it over I’ve decided to stick with my normal Edwardian timeframe. That won’t stop me from doing the odd “out of period” running session though!
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Hi Mikkel

 

Your new plans look very interesting indeed and I like the idea you have of seeking out buildings with character, the ones you have chosen seem to have been selected with a lot of thought.

 

I am really looking forward to seeing these develop over time and then through to completion.

 

I'm also really pleased to see you are sticking with the Edwardian era, I'd have felt a bit lonely otherwise.

 

Best of luck with the project.

 

Jim

The waterworks at Low Bradfield are about 3 miles as the Corvine flies from where I am sat right now - I can see the fields at the top of High Bradfield out of the window - when it isnt dark of course :)

There is a rather characterful waterworks at Windsor, near Slough, in GWR territory.  Might be too tall for you but some nice features for modelling.

 

see http://www.yourlocal...tle-waterworks/

 

 

Mike

I think that will make an interesting addition. My knowledge of Gloucester dates from the 80s when a lot had been rationalised. Bits and pieces like this were quite common.

Don

Really looking forward to seeing this develop Mikkel! That beer shed at Stratford is a lovely looking building and with your skills I'm sure it will make a fabulous model.

Delighted that you're sticking with the Edwardian theme, I'm sure you would miss all that lovely polished brass if you dabbled in the 1940s!

Best wishes

Dave
aberdare, on 18 Mar 2014 - 20:11, said:

Hi Mikkel

 

Your new plans look very interesting indeed and I like the idea you have of seeking out buildings with character, the ones you have chosen seem to have been selected with a lot of thought.

 

I am really looking forward to seeing these develop over time and then through to completion.

 

I'm also really pleased to see you are sticking with the Edwardian era, I'd have felt a bit lonely otherwise.

 

Best of luck with the project.

 

Jim

 

Hi Jim, yes I am looking forward to the buildings, not least after being inspired by some of those you have done.  I especially like your wooden buildings, but I haven't yet found an excuse one on Farthing. Yet!

Mickey, on 18 Mar 2014 - 21:33, said:Mickey, on 18 Mar 2014 - 21:33, said:

The waterworks at Low Bradfield are about 3 miles as the Corvine flies from where I am sat right now - I can see the fields at the top of High Bradfield out of the window - when it isnt dark of course :)

 

Hi Mickey, that's a funny coincidence. I really like the pics I have seen of those waterworks, there's a nice rustic look to them. Although for Farthing it would have to be brick I suppose, to match the general feel (or maybe not, I don't really have a feel for how much English towns were all stone/all brick around 1900, or if materials were mixed).

There is a rather characterful waterworks at Windsor, near Slough, in GWR territory.  Might be too tall for you but some nice features for modelling.

 

see http://www.yourlocal...tle-waterworks/

 

 

Mike

 

Thanks Mike, that's a very characterful building! There's something Iain Rice about it somehow! I think it may be a bit too big for what I room for. The waterworks sidings at Gloucester were actually only that: sidings. The works themselves seem to have been elsewhere, so I also have the option of leaving the buildings out altogether. But it would be nice to have some structures of some sort.

I think that will make an interesting addition. My knowledge of Gloucester dates from the 80s when a lot had been rationalised. Bits and pieces like this were quite common.

Don

 

Hi Don, I'm glad you think so. I realize that some people will find a design like this a bit restraining and uninspiring. But for me it's about finding a balance between something that is interesting to build, doesn't take up too much space and has a bit of operational potential. We'll see how it goes.

 

According to Google Maps, most of the arrangement at Gloucester Old Yard that inspired the plan is still there:  https://www.google.c...=!3m1!1e3?hl=da

wenlock, on 19 Mar 2014 - 00:47, said:

Really looking forward to seeing this develop Mikkel! That beer shed at Stratford is a lovely looking building and with your skills I'm sure it will make a fabulous model.

Delighted that you're sticking with the Edwardian theme, I'm sure you would miss all that lovely polished brass if you dabbled in the 1940s!

Best wishes

Dave

 

Thanks Dave, I've had my eye on that beer shed for a long time. I just had to copy it! I'm also looking forward to the stables, several on here were  helpful with info when I first looked into the idea of building one a couple of years ago (thanks gents!).

 

I'm glad too that I've decided to stick with Edwardian days. I do like the idea of a 1947 layout, which would open a whole new world of stock, and there are several on here who have shown that you can model that period in an interesting way. But there's a charm to the pre-grouping world (real or imagined!) that I can't let go of.

This looks like (another) very nice project in the making Mikkel.

I like the composition and I like forward to seeing the build - the open biscuit building at the front is a nice touch.

Staying tuned :good:
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Job's Modelling
Mar 19 2014 08:23

Hi Mikkel,

 

I like the ideaand the concept. I als agree that is good to stay within the Edwardian periode.

I would like to do a suggestion. I tried to do the rule of thirds on your plan.

Is it possible to change the possition of the Mess and the Weighbridge. The Weighbridge could be set a little further to the left in front of the point to the Biscuit shed. The Weighbridge with a horse and cart will form a nice central scenic viewing point if there is no shunting.

The viewers focus will go to the loco and wagons when you are shunting around.

 

Regards,

Job

bcnPete, on 19 Mar 2014 - 08:15, said:

This looks like (another) very nice project in the making Mikkel.

I like the composition and I like forward to seeing the build - the open biscuit building at the front is a nice touch.

Staying tuned :good:

 

Hi Pete, I hope the biscuit shed will work out OK. I do like having structures at the front of layouts, which I feel gives the viewer an "inside the scene" perspective. But the biscuit shed is different from my past efforts becuase it will not be see-through, in order to hide the short points and fiddle yard entry. Maybe I can add a few see-through apertures though. 

Job's Modelling, on 19 Mar 2014 - 09:23, said:

Hi Mikkel,

 

I like the ideaand the concept. I als agree that is good to stay within the Edwardian periode.

I would like to do a suggestion. I tried to do the rule of thirds on your plan.

Is it possible to change the possition of the Mess and the Weighbridge. The Weighbridge could be set a little further to the left in front of the point to the Biscuit shed. The Weighbridge with a horse and cart will form a nice central scenic viewing point if there is no shunting.

The viewers focus will go to the loco and wagons when you are shunting around.

 

Regards,

Job

 

Many thanks for these insights, Job. You have a point, this layout does not follow the rule of thirds very well, does it! For balance, my hope was that the stable block on the right would help add a bit of weight to the r/h rear part of the layout, thereby balancing out the biscuit shed. The latter is a bit against the normal rules, but as mentioned in the reply to Pete above I'm hoping it will be visually interesting.

 

Anyway, I think you could be right about moving the weighbridge in, and maybe swopping it with the mess room. The reason I put the weighbridge there is that I wanted to have an entry to the yard at the r/h front of the layout. But maybe I can do both.

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Job's Modelling
Mar 19 2014 09:20

Many thanks for these insights, Job. You have a point, this layout does not follow the rule of thirds very well, does it! For balance, my hope was that the stable block on the right would help add a bit of weight to the r/h rear part of the layout, thereby balancing out the biscuit shed. The latter is a bit against the normal rules, but as mentioned in the reply to Pete above I'm hoping it will be visually interesting.

 

Anyway, I think you could be right about moving the weighbridge in, and maybe swopping it with the mess room. The reason I put the weighbridge there is that I wanted to have an entry to the yard at the r/h front of the layout. But maybe I can do both.

 

I like the idea of the open shed, If you devide your plan using the rule of thirds you can see where you can create a nice loading/unloading scene in the shed.

The only way to see if the balance is correct between the buildings is to try it out 3D.

You also could try to lay the track in a 5 degree angle to the front.

Good idea Job, I will make some mock-ups and try it out. I originally made a very nice verion of this plan with curved sidings and long points, and no track parallel to the baseboard edges. Then I measured my available space, and I just couldn't fit it anywhere, so I had to make it simpler and smaller.

....... Although for Farthing it would have to be brick I suppose, to match the general feel (or maybe not, I don't really have a feel for how much English towns were all stone/all brick around 1900, or if materials were mixed).

Because Britain has such varied geology, there are big differences in local styles around the country, depending on the local stone. 

 

As Farthing seems to be located in the Vale of Pewsey, then Devizes may be a good place to examine for local styles. Try the paper at http://www.trustford...onservation.pdf

for more information about the area. 

 

On a broader theme, you could also read the building stone atlas for Wiltshire, which you can download as a PDF from http://www.bgs.ac.uk...EH_atlases.html

 

This contains lots of illustrations of local buildings in each county covered.

 

Of course, a big change occurred when canals allowed movement of building materials around the country. The Kennet and Avon canal, opened in 1810, appears to pass through Farthing  The canal enabled the cheap transport of Bath stone and it became a popular material for rebuilding in Devizes during the first half of the19th century.

 

Mike

I think something like the Waterworks would lose a lot if made in brick.....I also think you would be "safe" having such a building made out of stone in GW land :)

 

Ill go aim the camera at Low Bradfield (and a more local one) and put the results on here for perusal

 

ps my oldest known "family link " is from Bradfield in 15summat or other ;)

MikeOxon, on 20 Mar 2014 - 01:30, said:

Because Britain has such varied geology, there are big differences in local styles around the country, depending on the local stone. 

 

As Farthing seems to be located in the Vale of Pewsey, then Devizes may be a good place to examine for local styles. Try the paper at http://www.trustford...onservation.pdf

for more information about the area. 

 

On a broader theme, you could also read the building stone atlas for Wiltshire, which you can download as a PDF from http://www.bgs.ac.uk...EH_atlases.html

 

This contains lots of illustrations of local buildings in each county covered.

 

Of course, a big change occurred when canals allowed movement of building materials around the country. The Kennet and Avon canal, opened in 1810, appears to pass through Farthing  The canal enabled the cheap transport of Bath stone and it became a popular material for rebuilding in Devizes during the first half of the19th century.

 

Mike

 

Mike, the breadth of your knowledge is amazing. Thanks very much for those two useful resources. Another evening where the family will have to wait :)

 

I was not aware that the Kenneth & Avon Canal passes through Farthing, but yes of course you are right it does! Cue another layout (later!).

I think something like the Waterworks would lose a lot if made in brick.....I also think you would be "safe" having such a building made out of stone in GW land :)

 

Ill go aim the camera at Low Bradfield (and a more local one) and put the results on here for perusal

 

ps my oldest known "family link " is from Bradfield in 15summat or other ;)

 

Hi Mickey, thanks a lot, if you get the chance that would be a huge help! No hurry though, this will all take some time. I'll see what I can squeeze into the available space, it may have to be half relief but it looks like an interesting challenge.

 

15summat is an awfully long time ago, it must feel special to be living in an area where your family goes back that far.


I was not aware that the Kenneth & Avon Canal passes through Farthing, but yes of course you are right it does! Cue another layout (later!).

Yet another bite of the elephant! 

 

I have ancestors who lived in Devizes, so know a little about the area. The flight of 16 locks on the canal at Caen Hill is a major local feature that was re-opened by the Queen in 1990, after extensive renovation. The locks were lit by gas from1829.

 

The name 'Farthing' is unusual for the area, which lay outside the 'Danelaw'.  Perhaps the name implies that it was some distance from the main assembly!

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PaternosterRow
Mar 21 2014 00:19
Glad you've decided to keep with the Edwardian theme with this addition to Farthing and I'm looking forward to seeing this develop. Good choice of buildings too. Hope one day you'll do a dock or canal cameo which will nicely bring road, rail and water transport together at Farthing. Really do admire those that go the extra mile with research - this shows in the work and level of detail.
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Buckjumper
Mar 21 2014 18:27

Ugh! Late to the party again - still not getting the update notices.

 

Oh boy, this is looking very interesting now. 

 

I know the location of Farthing has always been left deliberately vague, but (personal preference, probably) I'd always imagined it somewhere between PDN and Oxford (despite the 0-4-4T!), so it's interesting to see ideas coming together from both within and without the GW system, and I'm looking forward to see how you make it all gel.

 

Of course I'm delighted that you've decided to stick with the Edwardian period. The 40s is a very interesting time of great change, but the pre-Group period is a tenacious beastie and once it's got its hooks in you...

....

I know the location of Farthing has always been left deliberately vague,....

Actually, the location is quite well defined!  See the map in http://www.rmweb.co....at-an-elephant/

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Buckjumper
Mar 22 2014 01:35
That was five years ago Mike! Wasn't too far out though was I? :D

That was five years ago Mike! Wasn't too far out though was I? :D

well  .........  towns tend not to move about much over a 5-year period  :)  In the case of Farthing, though, I suspect it must have disappeared down a giant sinkhole during WW1 and the event was 'covered up', to prevent loss of morale

PaternosterRow, on 21 Mar 2014 - 01:19, said:PaternosterRow, on 21 Mar 2014 - 01:19, said:PaternosterRow, on 21 Mar 2014 - 01:19, said:

Glad you've decided to keep with the Edwardian theme with this addition to Farthing and I'm looking forward to seeing this develop. Good choice of buildings too. Hope one day you'll do a dock or canal cameo which will nicely bring road, rail and water transport together at Farthing. Really do admire those that go the extra mile with research - this shows in the work and level of detail.

 

Hi Mike, I think it would be a canal then, as per Mike's post above maybe? The big challenge somewhere down the line is how to do the mainline platforms in a small space! It's complicated by the fact that it's not a terminus. Still, maybe I can use some of these tricks. Anyway, got plenty of time to worry about that. Say ten years or so :D. And maybe by that time I'll be living in a mansion that allows all the little layouts to be built into one, and my lottery win (due any time now, I'm sure) will allow me to contract people like Iain Robinson and Alan Downes to build the bits in between, while Mr Buckjumper does my locos. Simple, really.

Buckjumper, on 21 Mar 2014 - 19:27, said:Buckjumper, on 21 Mar 2014 - 19:27, said:Buckjumper, on 21 Mar 2014 - 19:27, said:Buckjumper, on 21 Mar 2014 - 19:27, said:

Ugh! Late to the party again - still not getting the update notices.

 

Oh boy, this is looking very interesting now. 

 

I know the location of Farthing has always been left deliberately vague, but (personal preference, probably) I'd always imagined it somewhere between PDN and Oxford (despite the 0-4-4T!), so it's interesting to see ideas coming together from both within and without the GW system, and I'm looking forward to see how you make it all gel.

 

Of course I'm delighted that you've decided to stick with the Edwardian period. The 40s is a very interesting time of great change, but the pre-Group period is a tenacious beastie and once it's got its hooks in you...

 

Hi Adrian, yep the 0-4-4T was always a bit of an oddity at Farthing :-)  As an alternative to its actual location, I can easily see Farthing as Oxford or somewhere around there. The locos that plied those rails are among my favourite ones.

 

It's a dilemma sometimes to like the rural GWR but also have a fancy for built up railway environments. Reading Basicilica Fields only makes it worse, there's so much of what you're planning that makes me think: I want that too!

I wish there was an easier way of multi-quoting  in the blogs! Anyway:

 

Buckjumper, on 22 Mar 2014 - 02:35, said:Buckjumper, on 22 Mar 2014 - 02:35, said:Buckjumper, on 22 Mar 2014 - 02:35, said:Buckjumper, on 22 Mar 2014 - 02:35, said:Buckjumper, on 22 Mar 2014 - 02:35, said:Buckjumper, on 22 Mar 2014 - 02:35, said:

That was five years ago Mike! Wasn't too far out though was I? :D

 

MikeOxon, on 22 Mar 2014 - 17:36, said:MikeOxon, on 22 Mar 2014 - 17:36, said:MikeOxon, on 22 Mar 2014 - 17:36, said:MikeOxon, on 22 Mar 2014 - 17:36, said:MikeOxon, on 22 Mar 2014 - 17:36, said:MikeOxon, on 22 Mar 2014 - 17:36, said:

well  .........  towns tend not to move about much over a 5-year period  :)  In the case of Farthing, though, I suspect it must have disappeared down a giant sinkhole during WW1 and the event was 'covered up', to prevent loss of morale

 

QuoteQuoteQuoteQuoteQuote

The name 'Farthing' is unusual for the area, which lay outside the 'Danelaw'.  Perhaps the name implies that it was some distance from the main assembly!

 

You two can't have paid much attention in history class. As better educated people will know, the history of Farthing goes all the way back to Middle Earth. If you look closely at this map of Farthing (prepared by one J. Tolkien) you will notice familar names such as Newbury (at that time a mere village on the outskirts of Old Forest) and Overbourne (at that time the name of a marsh somewhat distant from its current location).

 

As for why we cannot find Farthing on the map today, I really don't know what you mean. I passed through it just the other day, on the way to visit my aunt in Avalon.

 

:D

 

(Hmm, I think I'm getting a bit too nerdy with this now. I had better go do the dishes from last night before my wife wakes up!)

Thank you for the clarification on 'Farthing' - all is clear now.  As you have pointed out, my knowledge of history is highly distorted  :)

 

I'm glad I seeded the idea of a canal, though.  I'm sure it would make a fascinating addition to the Farthing scene.

Welcome to Farthing!

Attached Image: farthing2.jpg

 

This blog chronicles the building of "The Farthing layouts", a series of small OO layouts that portray different sections of a GWR junction station in Edwardian days.

 

Intro and concept
How to eat an elephant
Design principles
State of play

 

Gallery (1900-1904)
Four o'clock blues, ca. 1902
What really happened in the Cuban...
The honourable slipper boy (Part 1)
The honourable slipper boy (Part 2)
The honourable slipper boy (Part 3)

 

Gallery (1904-08)
The trials of Mr Bull
A most implausible arrival
A parcel for Mr Ahern
Blue skies and horse traffic
The Remains of the Day
Motley crew

Edwardian daydreams

 

Gallery (1914)
All in a day's work, Part 1
All in a day's work, Part 2
All in a day's work, Part 3
All in a day's work, Part 4

 

Out of period
Undecided sky (1867)
The sleeping giant (1887)
Bunker first (1927)
Fitted fish and piles (1947)

 

Videos
Once Upon a Time in the West
Summer silliness
The unbearable lightness...
Across the years
The Sidelight Job
Painting coach panels

Traverser testing

 

Coaches
Low-tech pre-grouping stock

Short trains for short layouts
Short trains with a twist
Hand-me-down coaches
Low-tech coach restoration (1)
Low-tech coach restoration (2)
Low-tech coach restoration (3)
Low-tech coach restoration (4)
Low-tech coach restoration (5)

 

Wagons
Sprat & Winkle couplings
3 plank Open in GWR red
Outside Framed 8 Ton Van

In the red: GWR 1900s wagon liveries
In loving memory...
Scratchbuilt one-planker (1)
Scratchbuilt one-planker (2)
MSWJR 3-plank dropside
LSWR 10 ton sliding door van
SDJR Road Van
LSWR stone wagon
Fake news and wagon sheets

 

Locos
GWR 1854 Saddle Tank (1)
GWR 1854 Saddle Tank (2)
Shiny domes and safety valve covers

 

Track
C+L underlay and Carr's ballast
Experiments with C+L track
Comparing track
Messing about with track panels
Laying track on "The depot"

 

Vehicles
GWR horse-drawn trolley
GWR 5-ton horse-drawn vehicle
Parcels van and coal trolley

 

Goods
Fun with crates
Barrels, baskets, bales
Small crates and tea chests

 

Figures
Andrew Stadden 4mm figures
Backdated Monty's figures
Footplate crew
HO figures for an OO layout
Lesser known whitemetal figures

 

Building "The bay"
First bite: "The bay"
Simple structures for "The bay"
Platform trolleys and barrows
Signs, posters and adverts
Six lessons learnt

 

Building "The depot"
Second bite: "The depot"
Shunting Puzzle
Sketches of The depot
Soft body, hard shell
Kit-bashed roof structure
Dry Run
Dusting off the cobwebs
Playing with mirrors
Mezzanine floor
Progress on "The depot"
4mm slate roofing
The treachery of images

A roof for "The depot"

A tall bird from Paddington
Cranes for the depot
Shoulders of giants
Flight of the bumblebee

 

Building "The sidings"
Third bite: "The sidings"
Wagon propulsion
Progress on "The sidings"
Rising from slumber
The Biscuit Shed
A shed and a lock-up
Agricultural merchant's warehouse
Mr Gorbachev, tear down this wall

 

The FSWDC
Railway modelling and Art
Moving Pictures
Season's greetings

 

Layout ideas
A flexible layout
Kicking back in Gloucester

 

Miscellaneous
GWR stables - an overview
Journey to Didcot
Detail hunting at Didcot
Here's looking at you
The mists of time (and all that)
My friend the operating chair
Ready-to-plonk freight
GWR Modelling website

 

More
RMweb Workbench
Flickr photostream

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