Jump to content
 

A Pannier of mixed parentage - GWR 1854 PT (2)


Mikkel

3,614 views

My 1854 class open cab Pannier Tank in ca. 1919 condition is now done. To recap, it’s a heavily modified Hornby 2721 body on a Bachmann 8750 chassis, using modified Finecast parts, Finney/Brassmasters fittings and various scratchbuilt items.  Here is a summary of the last part of the build (see this post for earlier steps).

 

 

002.jpg.591d769dbc574a812496050f5a6d0d76.jpg


The bunker uses modified Finecast sides. Plated coal rails from wire and styrene. DIY fire iron hooks, and lamp irons from a Brassmasters etch.

 

 

003.jpg.e8f988cfe617d241d25a71d749aec578.jpg

 
Cab windows were given a profile using circles of styrene cut on my Silhouette. 

 

 

 005.jpg.5d45533cf8149341442d43cc0d54f469.jpg

 

The cab roof on the Hornby 2721 body was retained but sanded down, including the strips along the sides which make the roof look thick and the cab too high. New slimmer raintrips were added, following the pattern seen on the prototype.


 

006.jpg.08c268409057352bfe99e9817b4a7287.jpg

 

The cab was pragmatically detailed with various bits from the spares box and springs nests from Brassmasters as used in the Finney 1854PT kit.

 

 

007.jpg.2401d6523842113b20c0a0e248810544.jpg

 
Splasher bands cut from styrene were added to the front splashers, which are the only ones retained from the original Hornby 2721 body. 

 

 

008.jpg.46c8ef3cdcdbd6820cabcc177a6ba527.jpg

 
Steam injector from Alan Gibson, IIRC. Center and rear splashers are from an old Finecast kit.

 

 

009.jpg.1ee5830cad1c5109abdd9d395a92934a.jpg 

The chimney from Brassmasters was then fitted, as used in the ex-Finney 1854 PT kit. Safety valve cover and bunker only loose fitted at this point, hence the lean.

 

 

010.jpg.3431863ff8270ed364bbdb9b91bf648c.jpg

 
The dome lubricator is also from Brassmasters.

 

 

011.jpg.a4490fa0785559f5a643a3e282d070a2.jpg

 
Alan Gibson buffers, with white styrene for the square bit on top. Sand boxes are off a Mainline Dean Goods, I think.

 

 

012.jpg.74a51eef2c750409069e122177916d74.jpg

 
The lamp irons are from this neat little Finney/Brassmasters etch.

 

 

013.jpg.39a13a670367b13aa756b23ab4258134.jpg

 
This shot illustrates the ungodly mix of RTR components, whitemetal parts, finescale fittings, and scratchbuilt bits and pieces.

 

 

014.jpg.6f5da250591e365e51fabde05d47039a.jpg

 
All grey primer from a rattle can. 

 

 

015.jpg.6e68ca5accc97e245e926fc153844063.jpg

 
Then various filling and sanding, followed by Archer’s rivets which I find bond better when fitted on primer. Micro-Sol was later used to “melt” away the decal paper.

 

 

016.jpg.7a4336b62c0d5415426884573916e93a.jpg

 
Next a base coat of matt black, to add depth to the top coats.

 

 

019.jpg.bb1fcf176f3f8ce72b44ce2b803723c0.jpg

 
Top coat and two coats of varnish. Cab windows glazed with 4.4 mm circles of 0.25 mm clear styrene. Flat base safety valve bonnet is from the old Mainly Trains range, happily still available from 51L. 

 

 

020.jpg.4032cd994ba8deb41c3af349ac3868eb.jpg

 
Medium handrail knobs and wire from Eileen’s Emporium, which sadly had to close shop recently. We owe suppliers like them a lot.

 

 

021.jpg.b613398adcf5390613d500140ddd07b9.jpg


Coaling with diluted PVA and a drop of detergent. The rush is sensational!

 

 

022.jpg.77eef74eb9ac884224288d62b1406a2e.jpg

 
Kernow MRC do a nice etch of fire irons. They are the long variety, so I shortened them and stuck the shafts behind the business end.

 

 

023.jpg.5eb3cf4b0943b5ca756ded5dc683c5a6.jpg

 
Photos tend to show fire irons fitted with the rings around the left hand hook, presumably for easy reach by the fireman. Couldn’t find a decent bucket in my spares box, does anyone know a source for buckets that are actually hollow? 

 

 

024.jpg.2ae7a2f213928b365fe26220890a1572.jpg

 

Loco lamps are from Modelu. These are actually tail lamps, but they’re what I had for now. This is the 1918-36 headlamp code for a class K ordinary goods. Must include some lenses with the next order.

 

 

025.jpg.749ae2d653615019203ba9acf3342f72.jpg

 
The number plates were purpose-made from Narrow Planet/Light Railway Stores. They are very good.

 

 

026.jpg.e04fcd2c44a8e5200e7721e2cbb4121e.jpg

 
Footplate crew also from Modelu. Both were too tall to go in the cab, so the driver’s legs were shortened while the fireman has a new set of legs off an Andrew Stadden figure. You can’t see their legs behind the cab sides anyway.

 

 

027.jpg.c266ebff1c8064737158c33379ab69fe.jpg

 
That’s about it. Screw couplings are on order from Wizard Models.

 

 

029.jpg.9e99327b4d0742757be8d0740a097312.jpg

 

I like my locos clean, but I suppose I ought to give this one a light weathering?

 

 

028.jpg.4b72230965cb9c835731f89bbd83885b.jpg


No. 1899 is part of a scheme to expand my Edwardian timeframe to allow occasional 1919 workings on my Farthing layouts. Allows me to build more goods stock from other companies, since it’s post-pooling.

 

 

030.jpg.58235a626b0f4a288a7e08a7eca055d7.jpg

 

The main work done. No doubt someone will release a brand new RTR version shortly (@RapidoCorbs& Co. maybe?). But I enjoyed the process.

 

 

000.jpg.1b2df1b78fd493fcf9ecf9c2dd557742.jpg


And so at last I have an open cab pannier, 42 years after the Hornby 1980 catalogue triggered the itch with their 2721 class. 

 

Speaking of years, there's a new one looming. So I've dug out this old photo. Happy New Year!
 

Img_2480.jpg.90cb0d562af0bcd5b0b82c933d472134.jpg

 

 

Edited by Mikkel

  • Like 22
  • Informative/Useful 1
  • Craftsmanship/clever 38
  • Round of applause 11

57 Comments


Recommended Comments



  • RMweb Premium

Quote"Medium handrail knobs and wire from Eileen’s Emporium, which sadly had to close shop recently"

 

You can get handrail knobs (4 different types) and wire from Alan Gibson.

  • Thanks 1
  • Informative/Useful 2
Link to comment

Really inspiring modelling as always, I do like the way you are using all manner of sources for parts, a man after my own heart, as I've been amassing details to upgrade my own Hornby 2721 tanks. Many have come from 247 Developments in Wales, they also carry different types of handrail knobs.

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Premium

All those fiddly details add up to a very good looking model. You have got an excellent paint finish, far more solid than a lot of rtr so I'd just let it develop a bit of natural grime rather than weathering it. 

 

I'll miss Eileens too, my last order from them arrived a few weeks ago. 

 

Perhaps we should go and upset the exotic wishlist enthusiasts by asking for a well moulded pack of empty buckets ? 

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold

Just amazing as always Mikkel.  Your eye for detail I think is stunning.

  • Agree 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Premium

Quote "No. 1899 is part of a scheme to expand my Edwardian timeframe to allow occasional 1919 workings on my Farthing layouts. "

IIRC wasn't the "Great Western" insignia used from 1922-34.

Many GWR tank engines didn't get any company markings at all. I'm doing a Milestones dual pack of 850 & 633 tanks, neither of which need insignia for my use.

  • Like 1
  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Premium

It's amazing that the venerable Triang Hornby R059 (I've got one) can be made to look like a proper pannier!

Very nicely done.

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold

I'm almost lost for words, so will employ just one .  .  .  .

 

                 .  .  .  . magnifique

 

 

  • Agree 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold

Wow, what an amazing tranformation...........fantastic model.

Mike

  • Agree 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment

Very very very nice indeed.  1899 is listed in Russel as built in 1895, Lot 98.  J.W.P. Rowledge's GWR Locomotive Allocations 1922-67 is a little more specific dating her as built in August '95 - so she's most likely a Leo, or possibly a Virgo.  Rowledge lists her as allocated to Bristol in 1922 with final shed Taunton, so Farthing in 1919 seems entirely reasonable.  She never made it into BR ownership being withdrawn in January 1945.

 

Regarding the 'Great Western' insignia, I see on the Brassmaster's site that Lee Marsh's 7mm model of 1854 Class number 1888 (built Jan 1891, Lot 83, Aberdare shed in 1922) is not only sporting a 'Great Western' insignia but a garter crest along with a polished Dome and copper capped chimney.  And very smart she looks too.  Similarly, and back in the 304.8mm/ft scale, 850 Class 2012 is shown with 'Great Western and garter crest when posing with her shiny new pannier tanks in August 1910.  Can't tell whether the dome is au naturale.

 

I also mourn the loss of Eileen's Emporium having spent a few bob (but obviously not enough) with them over the years.... I can only recommend we all do what we can to support the suppliers such as Brassmasters, Alan Gibson Workshop and Wizard Models (to name but three) who stock and sell the numerous bits and bobs that make our hobby what it is.

 

And a Happy New Year to all.

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to comment

It is as good as I thought it would be. Stunning work as always. I know the R-T-R people do a great job these days but the character you have achieved has brought the loco to life. Happy New Year.

Douglas. 

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold
14 hours ago, melmerby said:

Quote"Medium handrail knobs and wire from Eileen’s Emporium, which sadly had to close shop recently"

 

You can get handrail knobs (4 different types) and wire from Alan Gibson.

 

Thanks, Wizard Models also have a good selection of 4mm  handrail knobs - including the ex-Comet range plus what I assume is Alan Gibson? (labelled as manufactured by Comet but ref numbers are AG):

 

https://www.wizardmodels.ltd/?s=handrail+knobs&post_type=product&title=1&excerpt=1&content=1&categories=1&attributes=1&tags=0&sku=1&orderby=date-DESC&ixwps=1

 

 

13 hours ago, MrWolf said:

Really inspiring modelling as always, I do like the way you are using all manner of sources for parts, a man after my own heart, as I've been amassing details to upgrade my own Hornby 2721 tanks. Many have come from 247 Developments in Wales, they also carry different types of handrail knobs.

 

Thanks Rob, RTR mods are so satisfying. I remember that you mentioned upgrading a 2721 tank but didn't realize that you had more than one of them in the pipeline. Turns out Hornby did society a favour when they released the 2721, there have been numerous conversions of that loco over the years, keeping us all off the streets!

 

 

13 hours ago, Dave John said:

All those fiddly details add up to a very good looking model. You have got an excellent paint finish, far more solid than a lot of rtr so I'd just let it develop a bit of natural grime rather than weathering it. 

 

I'll miss Eileens too, my last order from them arrived a few weeks ago. 

 

Perhaps we should go and upset the exotic wishlist enthusiasts by asking for a well moulded pack of empty buckets ? 

 

Thanks Dave. It's interesting to note how my camera has picked up the shade of green a bit differently from photo to photo. In some cases the olive tinge is more pronounced than in reality. I have a new camera and it seems to be sensitive to which of my two workbench lamps dominate at a given time. But I wonder if it also has to do with the nature/translucency of the paint layers.

 

An exotic wishlist, I like that!

 

Edited by Mikkel
  • Like 3
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold

Just fab, Mikkel! I really enjoyed this post - huge amount of excellent work!

 

Happy New Year to you,

 

Nick. 

Edited by Brinkly
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold
13 hours ago, ChrisN said:

Just amazing as always Mikkel.  Your eye for detail I think is stunning.

 

Many thanks Chris. As usual it took longer than I thought it would. There seems to be three phases of projects like this:  (i) The creative phase, which involves the initial excitement of cutting things up and putting the main components together to create something new;  (ii) The mundane work phase, i.e. the middle stage which involves bringing it all together by sanding, filing, filling, fixing errors , adding uninteresting bits, waiting for orders of stuff you ran out of, etc; and (iii) the final detailing stage which is addressed with renewed vigour because you're so close now but which can drag on for ages because there are so many details, and where did I see that photo, and who was it that posted about this, and what book might have this info, etc. Isn't it wonderful! 😆

 

 

12 hours ago, melmerby said:

Quote "No. 1899 is part of a scheme to expand my Edwardian timeframe to allow occasional 1919 workings on my Farthing layouts. "

IIRC wasn't the "Great Western" insignia used from 1922-34.

Many GWR tank engines didn't get any company markings at all. I'm doing a Milestones dual pack of 850 & 633 tanks, neither of which need insignia for my use.

 

11 hours ago, Miss Prism said:

I can't recall seeing a Pannier without insignia. (Albeit grimed over in many instances.)

 

 

The "Great Western" insignia can be seen even on the early pannier tanks (in some cases with lining and garter ) in pre-WW1 days, and as Miss P says I have never seen a pannier without insignia. It's a pity really, as I like the simple workmanlike livery of the saddle tanks - which rarely had the insignia. 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold
12 hours ago, melmerby said:

It's amazing that the venerable Triang Hornby R059 (I've got one) can be made to look like a proper pannier!

Very nicely done.

 

Thanks. It's a nice little runner too. I have always liked the Bachmann 57xx/8750 chassis. There are different variants and one or two I've had do the "waddle" thing, but overall I like them. I suppose an updated version is due soon, though.

 

 

12 hours ago, longchap said:

I'm almost lost for words, so will employ just one .  .  .  .

 

                 .  .  .  . magnifique

 

 

Merci bien! Very kind of you. I did wonder whether to do a kit instead, but I'm not good at chassis building and I like the idea of using the old 2721 body anyway.

 

 

6 hours ago, ikks said:

Wow, what an amazing tranformation...........fantastic model.

Mike

 

Many thanks Mike. I've been pondering how much the extra detailing actually does for the transformation, when considering the time spent. There are similar conversions out there which look very good but with less effort involved.

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold
6 hours ago, Iain.d said:

Thats seriously good!

 

Kind regards,

 

Iain

 

Thank you Iain. It's good to see quite a number of RTR modifications/rebuilds going on here on RMweb at the moment, perhaps it is not a dying part of the hobby after all.

 

 

3 hours ago, Collett said:

Very very very nice indeed.  1899 is listed in Russel as built in 1895, Lot 98.  J.W.P. Rowledge's GWR Locomotive Allocations 1922-67 is a little more specific dating her as built in August '95 - so she's most likely a Leo, or possibly a Virgo.  Rowledge lists her as allocated to Bristol in 1922 with final shed Taunton, so Farthing in 1919 seems entirely reasonable.  She never made it into BR ownership being withdrawn in January 1945.

 

Regarding the 'Great Western' insignia, I see on the Brassmaster's site that Lee Marsh's 7mm model of 1854 Class number 1888 (built Jan 1891, Lot 83, Aberdare shed in 1922) is not only sporting a 'Great Western' insignia but a garter crest along with a polished Dome and copper capped chimney.  And very smart she looks too.  Similarly, and back in the 304.8mm/ft scale, 850 Class 2012 is shown with 'Great Western and garter crest when posing with her shiny new pannier tanks in August 1910.  Can't tell whether the dome is au naturale.

 

I also mourn the loss of Eileen's Emporium having spent a few bob (but obviously not enough) with them over the years.... I can only recommend we all do what we can to support the suppliers such as Brassmasters, Alan Gibson Workshop and Wizard Models (to name but three) who stock and sell the numerous bits and bobs that make our hobby what it is.

 

And a Happy New Year to all.

 

 

Thank you! Especially for corraborating the allocation to Farthing in 1919 😀 Yes, No. 1899 was the second to last member of its class, built August 1895 as you say, and fitted with B4 boiler and panniers Nov. 1911. 

 

Lee Marsh's model of the 1854 PT Finney kit is superb. There's another photo of it here: 

http://www.gwr.org.uk/gallee1.html

 

I did consider going for that earlier period with my loco  - there is not much difference in the condition - but decided to go with ca. 1919 for now as it fits my plans.

 

Somewhere I compiled a list of all the photos I have seen of early pannier tanks with the full garter and lining livery. Will see if I can find it.

 

 

3 hours ago, Neal Ball said:

Excellent work @Mikkel

 

Many thanks Neal. I know that you have been championing a new RTR 57xx/8750 RTR loco to current standards. If/when it appears, it will be interesting to see what options such as chassis might offer for conversions. And whether a RTR manufacturer can see the potential to kill two birds with one stone by also releasing an 1854/2721 open cab version.

 

 

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
Link to comment

That's a good one Mikkel - it may be a Pannier of mixed parentage but it looks thoroughly Swindon now -  a proper model of a loco I particuIarly like.  I guess my preference is for 1919 and the decade or so after with it's (mostly) painted brassware rather than the polished finesse of the Edwardian so I definitely approve of the painting scheme.  How do you manage the coaching stock livery for a 1919 scene? Lake, WW1 all over brown or rather tired fully lined Edwardian panelled?

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold
2 hours ago, gwr517 said:

It is as good as I thought it would be. Stunning work as always. I know the R-T-R people do a great job these days but the character you have achieved has brought the loco to life. Happy New Year.

Douglas. 

 

Thanks very much Douglas. The impetus to get it finished came from seeing your own excellent conversion.

 

I agree that something happens to the character of a loco when we start working on it. I sometimes wonder if it's not just the detailing, but also the imperfections in our work that helps add character.

 

 

2 hours ago, Bluemonkey presents.... said:

Fab just FAB!  Happy New Years modelling.

 

Thanks Matt! I'm looking forward to seeing what you come up with in the new year. Whatever it is, it will be interesting!

 

 

1 hour ago, Brinkly said:

Just fab, Mikkel! I really enjoyed this post - huge amount of excellent work!

 

Happy New Year to you,

 

Nick. 

 

Many thanks Nick. It's good to get it done. The next project is to continue with the station building at Newbury. Got some cutting of brick sheets to do. January 1st should be good for that. It used to be hangovers and sleeping late, these days it's waking up early and getting the Silhouette out. Oh well!  😄

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold
5 minutes ago, kitpw said:

That's a good one Mikkel - it may be a Pannier of mixed parentage but it looks thoroughly Swindon now -  a proper model of a loco I particuIarly like.  I guess my preference is for 1919 and the decade or so after with it's (mostly) painted brassware rather than the polished finesse of the Edwardian so I definitely approve of the painting scheme.  How do you manage the coaching stock livery for a 1919 scene? Lake, WW1 all over brown or rather tired fully lined Edwardian panelled?

 

 

Thanks Kit. It doesn't match your standards in any way but I'm happy with it. As for painted brassware, well I couldn't resist keeping the saftey valve cover unpainted. I believe it did happen on occasion. 

 

The plan is to retain my main emphasis and work effort on the Edwardian years, but to also have running sessions in the immediate post-WW1 period (we might even see the Peaky Blinders appear, even if Farthing is a bit far South!).

 

For the passenger rolling stock, I was thinking mainly of lake (including opportunsitically drawing on the Dapol Corridor Toplight stock). Maybe also some 1908-12 brown. I know very little of WW1 all over brown, but it's an interesting idea. Must look into that.

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment

It was the Hornby 2721 that set in train my movement into earlier time periods.  We all know that "the devil is in the detail" but you have tackled your demons very well and set an example to us all.  Sadly, my own models always seem to come to a halt after the basic outlines are completed and I always 'intend' to add details 'later'.  I admire your determination to see the job through 👏

Mike

Edited by MikeOxon
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Premium

A superb model.

 

The use of a black undercoat is interesting. You say "top coat and two coats of varnish" - just a single coat of green? What paint and how applied?

 

Likewise, what varnish have you used?

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
  • RMweb Premium
17 hours ago, Miss Prism said:

I can't recall seeing a Pannier without insignia. (Albeit grimed over in many instances.)

 

One or two possibilities

1490 (4-4-0PT) it has obvious lining but if there is insignia it must be dirtier than the rest of it, in the photos I have seen.

2120 ("the coach") after being shorn of its coach body and when first re-fitted with proper panniers it doesn't look like it has insignia but it could be grimed over.

(With the hybrid saddletank pannier it definitely had no insignia, when first running after removal of the dummy coach body.)

The crane tanks. They had names where the insignia should go.

 

Most panniers were just too dirty to determine whether they had or did not have insignia.

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...