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Canterbury & Whitstable Railway, Tayleur 0-6-0

5&9Models

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It's been a very long time since my last post (which I think was a 4mm scale chair!) but I've nearly completed my latest build: Canterbury & Whitstable Railway, Taylor 0-6-0 goods loco, no.121,  c1847.

The bulk of it was constructed whilst convalescing with a broken left metatarsal. What a tragedy to be signed off work and have to sit there day after day with my foot up, drinking tea and model making, life can be so cruel!

A friend offered some Portescap motor/gearboxes in exchange for kits so one of these formed the basis for this engine. The gearbox had to be dismantled and reversed so the driving axle sat under the motor and the wheels were some old Romford ones from the scrap box.

One of the biggest challenges was the haycock firebox with it's brass beading around the corners. The box itself was build up from two strips of scribed 10thou brass bent into an 'n', cut and soldered together, then the brass corners cut from 5thou, bent and beaten into submission around the curves, a horrible job and much learned in the process but it doesn't look too bad. It hasn't put me off doing another one anyway.

The tender was rest was gradually scratch built using good old fashioned measure, bend and cut techniques, as was the rest of the loco, a refreshingly 3D print free zone! It still requires some water feed pipes under the footplate and there is an annoying little short every time it goes left which I must sort out. Of course some crew will be required before it moves 'off shed' but they can wait.

The photographs leave a bit to be desired, I find the low sun at this time of year a bit tricky, our house faces due south and not casting a shadow over the photo at midday requires some degree of contortion. Hopefully they will do for now, next up is an 1845 Bodmer Single but as usual it will take me ages!

Thanks for looking and please feel free to ask if you need to know more.

First assembly.jpg

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IMG_1762.jpg

IMG_1761.jpg

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11 minutes ago, A Murphy said:

That is superb! Is there a matching layout?

 

 

Thanks, I'm working on it but it's a long way off yet; Bricklayers Arms c1844-45. 

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Good luck with it - I was always fascinated by the idea of Bricklayers Arms - boat trains ran through it I believe.  I still am!

 

A

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That's gorgeous.

I actually had to check that it was 4mm rather than 7mm scale.

Very well done.

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Brilliant.

 

The C&W isn’t exactly a well-known Line; where did you find the info to build it? Does Bradley cover it as an ‘absorbed’ engine?

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15 hours ago, Nearholmer said:

Brilliant.

 

The C&W isn’t exactly a well-known Line; where did you find the info to build it? Does Bradley cover it as an ‘absorbed’ engine?

Thanks. The C&WR was more a branch of the SER. I found a simple line drawing in the Vulcan Foundry archive, then by coincidence an article on these engines appeared in the recent Invicta (Journal of the South Eastern & Chatham Society which prompted me to get on with it.

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Until rechecking, prompted by what you say, I had it in my head that the C&W has remained independent for longer than it did. Thanks.

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That is a lovely thing- I lived in Whitstable for a number of years and walked parts of the C&W route many times- it always struck me as being very modellable.

For anyone looking for a good history of the line, I'd recommend Brian Hart's book published by Wild Swan in the early 90's

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Brilliant work, and what an interesting loco. Perhaps the only model in existence? 

 

Nice turntables too, by the way!

 

I'm off to look for something heavy that I can drop on my metatarsals.

 

Edited by Mikkel
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Excellent modelling. The firebox has come out really well for such an awkward shape. 

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I have uploaded this to another thread, but since early locos and Bricklayers' Arms have been mentioned, it may be of interest. The photos were lent to me by a friend, who was related to the fireman on the engine, when it was borrowed from France to represent the Crampton type of engine during the Festival of Britain. It was shedded at Bricklayers' Arms. There are some snippets of video in the thread in which I established its story. I will try to track them down and put a link here.

2-2-2 tender loco.jpg

Valerie's fireman Eric.jpg

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Correction - for Crampton read Crewe - it was a Buddicom 2-2-2. One of the videos is in this thread. Another link seems to have disappeared. 

 

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There is a sketch in Bradley’s book, perhaps the same as you used. When the SER became independant of the Croydon and Brighton loco committee, they went through a phase of long boiler engines, and this one was part of the goods design in 1845, six from Nasymth, 95-100, and four from Tayleur, 119-122. The Canterbury and Whitstable had opened with stationary engine haulage for most of the length, which proved unsatisfactory, and the line was taken over by the SER and rebuilt for loco haulage throughout. 120 and 121 went to work the section. All the class had boiler rebuilds later on, 121 wasn’t scrapped til 1883, when it was working at .

9A1A04CF-E233-41A1-AE9D-BB5E6BA5AB85.jpeg.e440ec2dfac25f44100abec5074a302a.jpeg

 

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On 06/12/2019 at 17:11, Nearholmer said:

Brilliant.

 

The C&W isn’t exactly a well-known Line; where did you find the info to build it? Does Bradley cover it as an ‘absorbed’ engine?

Thanks. The C&WR was more a branch of the SER. I found a simple line drawing in the Vulcan Foundry archive, then by coincidence an article on these engines appeared in the recent Invicta (Journal of the South Eastern & Chatham Society which prompted me to get on with it.

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