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5D_Stoke

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Profile Information

  • Location
    Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire
  • Interests
    Railway companies: NSR, LMS (NS section)
    MR, LNWR constituents of the LMS
    BR (LMR)
    GWR
    Modelling scales: 4mm (EM and 00), 7mm finescale

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  1. Perfect, thank you, just the detail I wanted to see! Is the picture date-able fro the LBSC brakevans or any other information apart from the obvious dumb buffers making it pre-1913? Harecastle is north of Stoke on Trent on the NSR, the junction station known as Harecastle, where the lines to Crewe and Macclesfield diverge, is now called Kidsgrove. It's not clear exactly which of the Harecastle Colliery companies this wagon was operated by; a quite look-up in the last few hours suggests it could be same operator as "HARECASTLE", Harecastle Collieries Ltd, sketched and noted as red oxide livery
  2. That PO wagon is also of great interest! Does the print have a bit more to the left, please?
  3. The image from Chitubox is very useful. What is your layer height? following guidance on a much-circulated graph (though I've only tried limited validation of it myself) I print at 32.14 degrees for 0.030mm layer height and 40.25 degrees for 0.04mm layer height. If you use the slider on the right to browse through the sliced layers you will get a good idea of how much suction there might be from large areas having to print at once. at only 10 degrees inclination in one axis there is going to be quite a lot of the floor printing at once, so you might have suction issues at that point. I agr
  4. If you are printing on an angle then a hole in the floor of the wagon isn't going to make a lot of difference to the suction forces, you'll already have dealt with those through the angle you choose. In your slicer program browse through the layers and see whether there are any points at which there are large areas that need to pull off the plate, if so it may be worth angling a little more or less, or printing in a different orientation. I use a Photon S and have had trouble with suction and "elephants foot" when printing flat on the plate but since angling prints using the optimum angles for
  5. I've tried getting tiny grooves between them but it just doesn't look right in 4 or 7mm scale, they appear too coarse. After all there is no real groove between leaves, they are absolutely tight together, the impression is given because the edges are very slightly rounded. Many etched or cast kit manufacturers don't capture the leaf detail of springs very well either, So for carriage springs, while I draw each leaf in CAD so I know they look right, for 3D printing I don't put any detail on the surface of the leaf spring at all. Because of the shape and profile of the ends of the leaves the ey
  6. I thought that wagon looked familiar. Quite a few years ago I drew these sides to use with Mainly Trains etched brass ironwork and Peco wagon bodies (or my similar home made resin casting) to make Godden & Rudd wagons. The attached file was printed in colour as a 6x4in print, plank lines lightly scored, and then the body parts cut out and the Mainly Trains brass, largely pre-painted black, were carefully glued on top. Then the solebar, headstocks etc were painted to match and the black touched up, with a weathering wash that filled in the scored plank lines. It sounds laborious but a decen
  7. Very nice work, I particularly like the fidelity of that axlebox. And with such an obscure prototype you can be 99.99% certain it won't suddenly be produced ready-to-run!
  8. Very interesting, is there a need, and a procedure, for printing by UV cured resin, as this SOP only covers FDM printing? I'd like to help, but I moved over from FDM to prototyping on a UV cured resin Photon S last year. We also have surplus protective gloves to potentially give away to somewhere in the NHS or care sector but there doesn't seem to be a shortage of gloves, only masks and aprons. Many thanks for any leads Mark (5D_Stoke) Res-N-Tech Ltd
  9. Very nice work, just a couple of questions, did it print perfectly straight, as that's quite a long model for 4mm? And that loss of random panelling is very wierd, did you actually fix and slice the STL yourself to see if it would print on your printer and notice whether the panel lines had disappeared then? A bit worrying if the panel lines were there on your fixed STL and just didn't print for no obvious reason... Best wishes for the next one.
  10. Very nice work, just a couple of questions, did it print perfectly straight, as that's quite a long model for 4mm? And that loss of random panelling is very wierd, did you actually fix and slice the STL yourself to see if it would print on your printer and notice whether the panel lines had disappeared then? A bit worrying if the panel lines were there on your fixed STL and just didn't print for no obvious reason... Best wishes for the next one.
  11. No Shapeways doesn't require you to order a print before they will sell designs for you. Though it is useful to test designs esp if you want one yourself, or to run a test at home if you have your opwn printer. I-materialise does demand you order one yourself first, and also has strict rules preventing the use of sprues, so every part has to be printed as a separate model. So although they do a beautiful 'Gray Resin' material with which I have had superb results, the cost of complex multi-part (even just body + underframe) models becomes unaffordable.
  12. In Sketchup I would simply draw the rectangle of the panel, draw two diagonal guide lines from corner to corner so they cross in the middle to establish the centre of the panel, then decide how far I want the projection to stick out. Then from the centre of the cross formed by the two diagonal guide lines, draw a line perpendicular to the panel the required projection distance. Then draw four lines to link the end of that line to each of the corners. In Sketchup that will immediately create four new faces in the form you want. Then delete the unwanted flat panel and guide diagonals behind.
  13. That looks amazing, thank you for sharing the files! I'm wondering how it will print on a UV-resin printer...
  14. Typical 4 wheeled 4mm scale wagons will generally fit within the print area of an Anycubic Photon S with no problem, even when printed on an angle of about 30 degrees on supports. Small carriage bodies also print this way. 7mm scale wagons and carriages are a bit more of a problem. In theory a 7mm scale wagon body up to about a scale 16 feet long, ie a typical pregrouping size, should fit on the print bed but there are snags with printing large items flat on the bed if a floor is included. Any large flat design parallel to the bed will cause suction problems as the first of each layer
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