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Blue paint from Victorian times was unstable, and could weather badly. I would suggest the same paint could have been used in both applications, but on a loco it would have a coat of varnish, whereas a wagon number plate wouldn’t get the same TLC, and more prone to fading.

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That throwaway remark about railmotors got me thinking that CA is set when a number of companies were trying them out. James........

 

Alan 

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2 hours ago, Northroader said:

Blue paint from Victorian times was unstable, and could weather badly .... and more prone to fading.

 

Oh, don't tell Nellie that!

 

949609484_IMG_6030-Copy(2).JPG.17791db518d13f905fc9f2731c612f5c.JPG

 

Did anyone tell the Caledonian that?

 

1 hour ago, Buhar said:

That throwaway remark about railmotors got me thinking that CA is set when a number of companies were trying them out. James........

 

Alan 

 

Well, there being no suburbs with competing electric trams to serve, the best candidate for revival by Motor Train or Railmotor is probably the Wolfringham branch.

 

Here, though, I'm loathe to displace the line's maid-of-all-work, the little Fox Walker, WNR No.2,and her planned trio of ancient 4-wheelers, so I've not yet gone further than admitting the possibility that a Dick Kerr petrol railmotor might have been trialed on the branch in 1905.  

 

Apropos the branch, thanks to Tom I have just seen the ex-CMR mineral loco for the Wolfringham branch made flesh.  The photographs of the prototype give but an inadequate sense of the bulk of the thing!  It has a very similar wheel diameter and wheel base to the little Fox Walker, but its dimensions dwarf my pretty little Bristolian in all directions!

 

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16 hours ago, robmcg said:

 

He left out the apostrophe in 'It's'.

 

 

Apostrophe catastrophe: the usual error* with this little piece of punctuation is to shove it in where it's not wanted. The best advice is: if in doubt, leave it out. Unfortunately, as in life in general, the most egregious mistakes are made by those who don't pause to doubt.

 

*According to the conventional rules. One has the choice of treating these as an inflexible code or, after the manner of Elizabeth Swann, as guidelines.

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5 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

The best advice is: if in doubt, leave it out.

 

In speech you have to guess the apostrophes by context anyway. Its not worth getting in a tizzy over! :jester:

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42 minutes ago, Hroth said:

 

In speech you have to guess the apostrophes by context anyway. Its not worth getting in a tizzy over! :jester:

 

Unlike say the greengrocer's plural...

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The detailing on that 00 Terrier is extraordinary. How does that get produced in volume James?

I am looking at the lining around the top of the cab sides, the copper and steel handrails, and the exquisitely shadowed B o x h i l l  on the tanksides ?  

Is any of it actually handpainted?

dh

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8 hours ago, wagonman said:

 

Unlike say the greengrocer's plural...

Only one???  :D

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RaR

 

I agree that the Terriers are quite astonishing, and looking in the other thread, the Hornby ones are extraordinarily good-looking too (micro- detail discussions left aside). 
 

Running qualities seem to be an issue with the Hornby ones, in that people report the pick-ups to be too fragile, but overall I find the giant leap from the c1970 generation of 00 r-t-r that I’m used to the c2020 generation a real eye-opener.

 

They must surely be assembled by a lot of nimble-fingered young Chinese women ...... such fine work always falls to young women.

 

K

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21 hours ago, Edwardian said:

 

A longer wait than anticipated, but the production livery sample, though rejected for a registration error in the boiler band lining, shows a distinct advance on the livery sample revealed last autumn, so I think these will be worth the wait when they do arrive. 

 

terrierupdate.png.a578c690bf568725946c26352e6f57a5.png.abbe567ee1413cb50e819c45f377a28b.png

Very nice indeed but those lamp irons ! They must be using the same formulation of silver paint that I used on my Airfix B25 Mitchell back in 1974...

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18 hours ago, Buhar said:

That throwaway remark about railmotors got me thinking that CA is set when a number of companies were trying them out. James........

 

Alan 

Indeed. In 1905, railmotors were still fashionable. By c.1910, they had been tried and set aside. The WNR could have bought used ones very cheaply. Whether they'd have shelled out for new railmotors is a moot point.

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As usual i'm three months behind everyone else:D  So belatedly here are a few 'Nellie' looking pics' i found in an excellent book called 'A Lancashire Triangle. Part 2' by Denis Sweeney. Funny how the names 'Emanuel Clegg' and 'George Peace' are both very Yorkshire sounding names for loco's that were always based and used in Lancashire pits. 

 

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2020-01-16_10_34_51.jpg

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3 minutes ago, Owd Bob said:

As usual i'm three months behind everyone else:D  So belatedly here are a few 'Nellie' looking pics' i found in an excellent book called 'A Lancashire Triangle. Part 2' by Denis Sweeney. Funny how the names 'Emanuel Clegg' and 'George Peace' are both very Yorkshire sounding names for loco's that were always based and used in Lancashire pits. 

 

2020-01-16 09.35.13.jpg

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2020-01-16_10_34_51.jpg

 

Those are some wonderful locos, Bob, thanks.

 

Presently, in between reading The Secret Commonwealth I'm also enjoying The Private Railways of County Durham, which has a great introductory chapter on locomotive builders in the 'Earlies', and then charts each system in turn, with plenty of interesting Victorian and Edwardian locomotives to admire.

 

As for the Nell Gwyn Nellie conversion, she has always struck me as a late Nineteenth Century locomotive. The cab style, the heft of the boiler, the bunker coal rails, all fit a little better for me at the end of the Century, and I posit an 1899 build date for her, putting her in the first generation of new-build locomotives catering for Light Railways under the 1896 Act.   

 

As such, she would have entered service with a set of 4-wheelers but, by 1905, or, more probably 1906-07, she might be paired with a driving trailer instead. 

 

I wonder where she lives?

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Anyone got any more info on 'James Lord' or 'George Peace'? They look like they might be a good match for a build on the old Terrier chassis.

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50 minutes ago, TurboSnail said:

Anyone got any more info on 'James Lord' or 'George Peace'? They look like they might be a good match for a build on the old Terrier chassis.

 

EDIT: George Peace was a Lowca Engineering (Fletcher Jennings?) 'D Class', 245 of 1906.

 

Indeed, it would be vastly useful if there were industrial locos that matched; 4' wheels at 6' centres are not common in mainline locos. 4' wheels are a tad too small for many mainline types while a tad too big for most industrials, but these larger beasts might prove the exception. 

 

Following Old Gringo's kind donation of his Nellie, I've just been sent this, another kind donation, this time from Ian .....

 

IMG_6116.JPG.03d81a0f85888a72a3fb87cb2d6c87b1.JPG

 

When I find a non-Phillips screwdriver big enough, I'll see what's under the bonnet. These older Continental chassis tend to cram the available  body space with vasty motors, so it might be that Owd Bob's post on large industrial side tanks is timely.

 

A good runner, I'm glad to report. 

 

IMG_6117.JPG.0ca6d6bec1d1b4e76d69ed7ef70cfae3.JPG

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Edited by Edwardian
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As for the apostrophe its its own fault.

Please add punctuation to your choice if you think it would mke it clearer.

Don

 

 

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45 minutes ago, TurboSnail said:

Anyone got any more info on 'James Lord' or 'George Peace'? They look like they might be a good match for a build on the old Terrier chassis.

Will go read my book and report back soon;)

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Not a lot in the book but hope it helps. 'George Peace' was built in 1906 by Lowca engineering of Whitehaven. an 0-6-0 side tank with inside cylinders and joys valve gear. 'James Lord' was built in 1903 again by lowca of Whithaven.  The earliest of three identical loco's was named  'T.B. Wood' and was also built by lowca in 1897. All three worked well into the early 1950's at the Gin Pit, Tyldesley Lancs' A pic of 'T.B. Wood' in the engine shed at Gin Pit after the roof had collapsed in 1956.

 

Edited by Owd Bob
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Thanks all - it might be a Fletcher Jennings thing, their Class J I have a catalogue image of, which also has 4ft wheels at 6ft centres.

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2 minutes ago, Owd Bob said:

Not a lot in the book but hope it helps. 'George Peace' was built in 1906 by Lowca engineering of Whitehaven. an 0-6-0 side tank with inside cylinders and joys valve gear. 'James Lord' was built in 1903 again by lowca of Whithaven.  The earliest of three identical loco's was named  'T.B. Wood' and was also built by lowca in 1897. All three worked well into the early 1950's at the Gin Pit, Tyldesley Lancs'

 

A similar summary Here, also noting the Naysmith Wilsons.

 

This, gives Tom what he needs, however: T B Wood given as an H Class, 233 of 1899, with 46" diameter wheels and a w/b of 11'6".  Reasonably close to the Terrier.

 

George Peace also featured in Industrial Locomotives & Railways of the NW, with a rear view Here 

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Loads of great info there Edwardian, thanks.  Here's a rear end pic of 'TB Wood' in the shed at Gin pit, somehow it would'nt let me post it above.:rolleyes:  It could help a lot in the rear cab and bunker detail construction if anyone's thinking of modelling it.

 

2020-01-16 12.58.27.jpg

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On 16/01/2020 at 13:14, Owd Bob said:

Loads of great info there Edwardian, thanks.  Here's a rear end pic of 'TB Wood' in the shed at Gin pit, somehow it would'nt let me post it above.:rolleyes:  It could help a lot in the rear cab and bunker detail construction if anyone's thinking of modelling it.

 

2020-01-16 12.58.27.jpg

 

That's a great picture, thanks, Bob.

 

As an aside, WNR No.10 is an ex-Brighton Terrier.  I had an old Dapol/Hornby one to convert, but, frankly, repainting a new Rails A1 would be a better bet.

 

That would leave me with a spare Dapol/Hornby Terrier chassis.  If Tom elects to develop these FJ/Lowca 0-6-0s for Hardy's Hobbies to market as body kits for the Terrier chassis (I guess this is where Tom is going with this), I'd be interested, particularly if the earlier version, T B Wood (1899), or James Lord (1903), were included.

 

On the other hand I could knock one up out of plasticard, but I daresay Hardy's will be selling them long before I would get round to that!

 

It looks to me like the cab rear is a later, home-made, addition.  It looks as if as-built these were half-cabs (single cabs, apparently, if you're of Midland persuasion), as seen in the picture of James Lord that you posted.  Plenty of variations for Hardy's, but the earlier engines with their original half-cabs would suit me best.  

 

801578223_LowcaEngineeringTBWood233of1899.jpg.6dd7990b1d844ac754d55b4177832884.jpg

682062920_LowcaEngineeringJamesLord1903.jpg.5943d856c785b0b0801d689e6882b92f.jpg

Edited by Edwardian
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Please, please, please tell me that you will build this one and name it "Lord James".

Lowca Engineering James Lord, 1903.jpg

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10 minutes ago, Regularity said:

Please, please, please tell me that you will build this one and name it "Lord James".

Lowca Engineering James Lord, 1903.jpg

 

I fear I'm being typecast ...

 

ripping_ogilvy.jpg.86233edd4e9d8192521c11bd56d48ce3.jpg

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You could add ‘Lord Jim’, by Joseph Conrad, to your reading list, if you are content with the contraction. It’s an interesting tale.

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