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Al.

The Bridge at Remagen - N Gauge Rhine Crossing in 1944.

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A variant of the Panther called Bergepanther. An armoured engineers vehicle used for recovery and repair of battle damaged or broken down tanks. Sometimes built from knocked out vehicles reworked at base factories although some were new build.

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18 minutes ago, sir douglas said:

what are the walls for on the engine decks of those 3 panthers?

All the Panthers on that train are fitted with infrared night fighting equipment. As part of the way they operated, they had Panzer Grenadier tank riders on the rear engine deck. The plates were part of the screen for them.  

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I was really looking forward to seeing this at Trainwest today and have to say i wasn't disappointed. The attention to detail in the landscape over such a large model is amazing. Likewise the railway stock and the military equipment all looked superb and the operation seemed excellent with a very regular flow of different and interesting trains. Brilliant work and thank you for showing it.

 

Mike

 

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A short collection of my videos of Remagen from this weekends TrainWest show.

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On 13/04/2019 at 22:25, Al. said:

All the Panthers on that train are fitted with infrared night fighting equipment. As part of the way they operated, they had Panzer Grenadier tank riders on the rear engine deck. The plates were part of the screen for them.  

Oops.

 

Every day a school day. Cheers Al

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One of the curious thing that happens when running Remagen during a weekend is the Red Cross Train keeps shrinking in length from 8 coaches down it 3. This is mainly down to the coaches regally uncoupling from each other due to inconstant coupling heights. 
In an effort to fix this I've experimented with modified the couplings on the rake to magnetic couplings.

So far it seems work well, with the added bonus of a nice close coupling between coaches. We'll see how it runs at the next show.

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One of the curious thing that happens when running Remagen during a weekend is the Red Cross Train keeps shrinking in length from 8 coaches down it 3. This is mainly down to the coaches regally uncoupling from each other due to inconstant coupling heights. 
In an effort to fix this I've experimented with modified the couplings on the rake to magnetic couplings.

So far it seems work well, with the added bonus of a nice close coupling between coaches. We'll see how it runs at the next show.

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41 minutes ago, Al. said:

One of the curious thing that happens when running Remagen during a weekend is the Red Cross Train keeps shrinking in length from 8 coaches down it 3. This is mainly down to the coaches regally uncoupling from each other due to inconstant coupling heights. 
In an effort to fix this I've experimented with modified the couplings on the rake to magnetic couplings.

So far it seems work well, with the added bonus of a nice close coupling between coaches. We'll see how it runs at the next show.

 

 

A brilliant idea - real left field thinking. 

 

Al, you need to patent this idea before PECO get wind of it!

Edited by TEAMYAKIMA
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Remagen has made it into the pages of the June edition of British Railway Modelling.

There's some excellent photos taken by Andy York and nice write-up too.

 

I'm feeling really pleased this morning...:dirol_mini:

 

Bridge_jpg_94d8e3f21773e5574c959b3828667382.jpg.d1a51ee77bbf80759c9ebeaa6cd31c36.jpg

 

 

183606.jpg

 

Edited by Al.
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Looking through an old computer file today and came across some old photos of Remagen. This is how it looked 4 years ago.

 

 

Remagen101_zpsdkgj5hle.jpg

Remagen102_zpsmitdyp1k.jpg

Remagen104_zps9jn0md9m.jpg

Remagen106_zpsc53y22h5.jpg

Remagen107_zpssqofni6f.jpg

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6th June 2019 marks the 75th anniversary of D-Day, the largest combined naval, air and land operation in the history of warfare.

 

We remember all those who fell on that day.

61936005_1052447881623894_6233093325797195776_n.jpg

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Finally picked up a couple or two of BRM. :D

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Congratulations, Al!

 

It was your posts I saw many years ago now over at MRF that encouraged me to particpate in online forums.  I think the bridge was sat solo on a buffet or sideboard at that time?  Great to see the culmination of all that work is now in print for posterity.

 

Cheers

 

Scott

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Who's bright idea was it to make a vineyard by the church?
Two hours of planting poles for the vines. A third of the yard done. 
Wires and vines still to do.

 

 

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53 minutes ago, Al. said:

Who's bright idea was it to make a vineyard by the church?
Two hours of planting poles for the vines. A third of the yard done. 
Wires and vines still to do.

 

 

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Look on the bright side, a real vineyard would take a lot long and need a lot more work over the years! 

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On 09/06/2019 at 19:27, Al. said:

Who's bright idea was it to make a vineyard by the church?
Two hours of planting poles for the vines. A third of the yard done. 
Wires and vines still to do.

 

 

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They might have been hard work, but the result is brilliant.

I live near the  Rhine just north of where you are modelling and you've captured the feeling of the vines in the area perfectly. 

All the best

Dave

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17 hours ago, DavidMcKenzie said:

They might have been hard work, but the result is brilliant.

I live near the  Rhine just north of where you are modelling and you've captured the feeling of the vines in the area perfectly. 

All the best

Dave

 

Dave, 

 

A bit of research I've missed - Can you recall if they produce red or white wine in the area?

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I believe Germany did not produce much red compared with white before the 1990's, and even now it is only about 30% of what they produce.

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2 hours ago, Al. said:

 

Dave, 

 

A bit of research I've missed - Can you recall if they produce red or white wine in the area?

All the vines I have seen in the area whilst walking etc. are white grapes. I'm not actually a local, just been living here a while.

 

I've also asked my father inlaw (who is a local) and he confirmed that he is also not aware of any red wine production in the local area and that would also have been the case in the 40s. From that I'd conclude that if not all, then at least the vast majority will be white. I'm always hesitant to say it's impossible or has never been done, but the climate and soil here just doesn't lend itself to red grapes, where as it seems perfectly suited to white grapes.

 

All the best

Dave.  

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47 minutes ago, DavidMcKenzie said:

All the vines I have seen in the area whilst walking etc. are white grapes. I'm not actually a local, just been living here a while.

 

I've also asked my father inlaw (who is a local) and he confirmed that he is also not aware of any red wine production in the local area and that would also have been the case in the 40s. From that I'd conclude that if not all, then at least the vast majority will be white. I'm always hesitant to say it's impossible or has never been done, but the climate and soil here just doesn't lend itself to red grapes, where as it seems perfectly suited to white grapes.

 

All the best

Dave.  

 Thanks. 

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Its not the colour of the grapes that determines the colour of wine but the method of fermentation.

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1 hour ago, PhilJ W said:

Its not the colour of the grapes that determines the colour of wine but the method of fermentation.

I am no expert, but I believe you are right and the colour comes from having the skin on or not during the fermentation process, but I might be wrong there.

From what I've seen on walking trips through vineyards around here it is white wine made from white (or greenish/yellow...?) grapes. I don't confess to be an expert, purely my observations from walking tours when out and about in the valley of the Rhine between Bonn and Koblenz.

 

All the best

Dave

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I'm no expert on wines either - Apart from the drinking bit - But here's the first attempt. 

 

 

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On 09/06/2019 at 19:22, Chris116 said:

Look on the bright side, a real vineyard would take a lot long and need a lot more work over the years! 

 

I can vouch for that!

 

Al, I think you might be better leaving off the trellis wires - only 1.8mm or 2mm in reality which is seriously small at 1:160.

 

Not sure of German trellis methods at that time, but one would expect three or four vines between each post.

Edited by Joseph_Pestell
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